PDA

View Full Version : This is why I like the Hare Krishna movement



indianx
09 August 2007, 02:46 PM
Before I go on, I will say that I disagree with some of the elements within the ISKCON organization, but here is one reason why I still like them:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=InafM_gC3pY

They are probably the only Hindu organization in the world (perhaps one of the few) with members willing to dedicate their lives to the Dharma to that extent. Now, I know that many of our members disagree with some of ISKCON's theological beliefs (even I do), but you have to admire their efforts to introduce the dharma to countries that have never even had the opportunity to hear about our religion.

Jigar
09 August 2007, 04:14 PM
Namaste indianx,
those to me are the classical Hare's K's.
A more modern form of appraisal can be seen here: ATMA
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m1Xlnudc5GM&eurl=http%3A%2F%2Fforums%2Eratedesi%2Ecom%2Fshowthread%2Ephp%3Ft%3D234610 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m1Xlnudc5GM&eurl=http%3A%2F%2Fforums%2Eratedesi%2Ecom%2Fshowthread%2Ephp%3Ft%3D234610)

my own twist:


maste nam,
jigar

Baobobtree
10 August 2007, 08:51 AM
They are probably the only Hindu organization in the world (perhaps one of the few) with members willing to dedicate their lives to the Dharma to that extent. Now, I know that many of our members disagree with some of ISKCON's theological beliefs (even I do), but you have to admire their efforts to introduce the dharma to countries that have never even had the opportunity to hear about our religion. I agree to an extent, but I'd wonder if they let their converts continue to practice elements their traditional religion ( whether it be Islam, Christianity or Afro-Paganism). One of the things I hate about mass religious conversion missions is that they actually destroy cultures, by diminishing a religions followers greatly, and there by destroying a big chunk of a culture.

indianx
10 August 2007, 02:16 PM
I agree to an extent, but I'd wonder if they let their converts continue to practice elements their traditional religion ( whether it be Islam, Christianity or Afro-Paganism). One of the things I hate about mass religious conversion missions is that they actually destroy cultures, by diminishing a religions followers greatly, and there by destroying a big chunk of a culture.That's true. I don't know how the Hare Krishna movement handles these things. I've heard ISKCON referred to as "Christianized Hinduism" and I think, to an extent, that's a credible claim in that they limit themselves to Krishna and tend to be pretty dogmatic.

I would like to know what you, and others, think about the issue of proselytization from the Hindu context. I asked Satay about this recently, because I'm actually unsure about how we should approach this as Hindus.

One of my concerns is that the depth and diversity of Hindu thought that makes the religion so interesting might get lost if we engage in the practice. But, still, how should we then go about introducing the dharma in places such as Africa? I definitely do not think that Hinduism should be restricted to India, Nepal, or the places where Indians migrate to en masse, though.

Ganeshprasad
10 August 2007, 04:48 PM
Pranam all


That's true. I don't know how the Hare Krishna movement handles these things. I've heard ISKCON referred to as "Christianized Hinduism" and I think, to an extent, that's a credible claim in that they limit themselves to Krishna and tend to be pretty dogmatic.

I would like to know what you, and others, think about the issue of proselytization from the Hindu context. I asked Satay about this recently, because I'm actually unsure about how we should approach this as Hindus.

One of my concerns is that the depth and diversity of Hindu thought that makes the religion so interesting might get lost if we engage in the practice. But, still, how should we then go about introducing the dharma in places such as Africa? I definitely do not think that Hinduism should be restricted to India, Nepal, or the places where Indians migrate to en masse, though.

I have been attending Iskcon temple since 1976 and I still do largely for the deity darshan and Kirtan, I just love that but thatís about as far as is my interest with them.

There is extreme danger in spreading a cultish mentality, as per my understanding dharma is for an individual to cultivate, spreading dharma to gain popularity or large congregation has never been in Hindu tradition.

Walking the path of dharma is like walking on a double edge sword. To gain large followers leads to watering down the standards. Truthfulness purity sacrifice becomes a casualty in the advancement of ones institute and dharma get forgotten.

donít get me wrong bhakti is for everyone, any one who so ever desires it, and that is the main point the desire must be there or else in due course of time the fad disappear and the Maya takes hold and many so called devotees bring disrepute to dharma.

The true essence of worship is pure devotion and true love and this love of the Lord must find its very concrete expression in the conduct of the devotee in the day to day life. It would not remain a mere mental concept.

Let see what Krishna says about preaching

idam te natapaskaya
nabhaktaya kadacana
na casusrusave vacyam
na ca mam yo 'bhyasuyati

This (knowledge) should never be spoken by you to one who is devoid of austerity, who is without devotion, who does not desire to listen, or who speaks ill of Me. (18.67)

And here is what Chetanya Mahaprabhu said

na dhanam na janam na sundarim kavitam va jagadisa kamaye mama janmani jamanisvare bhavatad bhaktir ahaituki tvayi

"Lord of the universe, I do not desire wealth, followers, a beautiful wife or fruitive activities described in flowery language. All I want, life after life, is unmotivated devotional service unto You."

What is so sad is Iskcon refuses to be identify as Hindus. Yet it largely depends on generous donation of Hindus. Many young Indians in the west, are drawn to this movement largely because, one they need an identity to hold on to, two it is presented in a way that is more palatable and easy to understand as against seemingly rigid rules and many gods and goddesses.

Young Hindu guys are targeted and drawn to this movement for ease of understanding presented in black and white, at an expense of vast Vedic tradition, and freedom of thought that is the hall mark of our dharma. Culture or tradition becomes a victim in many cases.

If there was one word that really gets to me above everything else is the use of this word ĎDEMIGODí to describe Devas, it presupposes inferiority although they are all worthy of our worship.

Jai Shree Krishna