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yajvan
19 November 2007, 08:17 PM
Hari Om
~~~~~

Namaste,

I thought I would offer some of the wisdom found in the Vijnana Bhairava. It is very practical and its orientation is 'a wack in the side of the head'. What do I mean by this. The sutras or vallis considered karikas (verses) are all about the sadhu realizing Self, Brahma Sakshtkara ( Self Realization) getting to Bhairava¹.

This is the beauty of these agamas ( that which is handed down) of Saivism. As I see it Saivism suggests, sure philosophy is a boon to discuss, yet lets make hay while the sun shines - this lifetime, lets be introduced to Siva, to Bharirava to our SELVES.

So , Perhaps I thought to offer some of the karika's that are there… they are most succinct, insightful, and without fluff. They are the 'wack' I know I can use, and thought to share some I find useful and to me profound.

So , lets start at the beginning? Nope. Lets start with karika 100, as for me, it sets the stage on why this Knowledge is so attractive to the sadaka [one practicing spiritual disciplines], sisya [student] or mumuksu [the seeker with the burning desire for liberation].

Here is this karika from the Vijnana Bhairava that gives some insights and dharana ( a practice, contemplation, meditation). It says
cid-dharna sarva dehesu vishesi nasti kutracit|
Atashca tanmayam sarvam bhavayan bhavajij-janah||
The One, which is characterized as Consciousness is residing in all the bodies; there is no differentiation in anything. Therefore ( or Hence ) if a person realizes that everything is full of that (very Consciousness) he conquers the world of becoming.

So what's this all about?
In all bodies [sarva deshesu] from the smallest , most feeble insect to the body of Brahma, Consciousness is the same, without differentiation. There is no difference [visheso nasti kutracit] in caitanya , in consciousness.

The dharana or meditation is, if the native or sadhaka ( one that practices sadhana) fixes his/her awareness on this, that caitanya [consciousness] that is the same, homogeneous, in each and every object (a smooth continuum) he/she conquers the duality of individual level [I]to the Supreme level [Aham].

That is, the duplicity of Life of the objective world is then seen in turiyatit chetana (sustained turya) i.e. higher levels of Consciousness devoid of the duality. Swami Lakshamjoo prefers to Call this state God Consciousness.

If one has time during the day to try this, its' a slight wack to the side of the head. There are some more interesting 'wacks' perhaps you may find of interest, and I will share in some new postings.

ॐनमःिशवाय



1. This HDF post may be of use: http://www.hindudharmaforums.com/showpost.php?p=17892&postcount=52

pranams,

yajvan
20 November 2007, 12:24 PM
Hari Om
~~~~~




Here is this most karika from the Vijnana Bhairava that gives some insights and dharana ( a practice, contemplation, meditation). It says
cid-dharna sarva dehesu vishesi nasti kutracit|
Atashca tanmayam sarvam bhavayan bhavajij-janah||
The One, which is characterized as Consciousness is residing in all the bodies; there is no differentiation in anything. Therefore ( or Hence ) if a person realizes that everything is full of that (very Consciousness) he conquers the world of becoming.

So what's this all about?
In all bodies [sarva deshesu] from the smallest , most feeble insect to the body of Brahma, Consciousness is the same, without differentiation. There is no difference [visheso nasti kutracit] in caitanya , in consciousness.

The dharana or meditation is, if the native or sadhaka ( one that practices sadhana) fixes his/her awareness on this, that caitanya [consciousness] that is the same, homogeneous, in each and every object (a smooth continuum) he/she conquers the duality of individual level [I]to the Supreme level [Aham].



Namaste

When one looks at this information/approach above it may be new to ones thinking. How to in-vision this consciousness [ sva-caitanya] everywhere?

Where does one start? the concept seems a bit foreign to you The place to start is with akasha - pure space. Perhaps you cannot 'see' consciousness/awareness.. Yet you can see/sense Space. Theses 3 posts will assist you with this akasha if you wish to pursue this notion.
The interconnectedness of everything: http://www.hindudharmaforums.com/showthread.php?t=713 (http://www.hindudharmaforums.com/showthread.php?t=713)
Interconnectedness akasha dristi part 1 http://www.hindudharmaforums.com/showthread.php?t=725 (http://www.hindudharmaforums.com/showthread.php?t=725)
Interconnectedness akasha dristi part 2 http://www.hindudharmaforums.com/showthread.php?t=892 (http://www.hindudharmaforums.com/showthread.php?t=892)

The other word I used in the first post is dharana. Now this word has a few uses. If we were discussing Patanjali and his Yoga Sutras dharana would have a specific use.

In the Vijnana Bhairava the word is not found. Yet people who teach this way use the word to describe the various methods called upadesa or nistaranga upadesha, undistracted instructions. Yet this upadesha is known as spiritual instruction, it also is known as Upaya , or skillful means, technique or way, means of approach.

In Kasmir Shaivism there are 3 upayas for taking individual consciousness to that of Fullness of Being, To Brahman, to God Consciousness. They are the following:

Sambhavopaya [Sambhava - upaya] - this is considered the highest means
Saktopaya - this is considered the middle means
Anavopaya - this is considered entry levelWhy even bother mentioning this? The techniques in Vijnana Bhaitava run the gamut of these 3 approaches. For one on the path some approaches are more suitable for them then the others. Also note this same three Upayas are the foundation for the Siva Sutras e.g. the 3 sections ( or nihsyandas ~ chapters ), The First Awakening or Sambhavopaya, The Second Awakening is Saktopaya, and the Third Awakening is Anavopaya. This is the brilliance of the masters that teach this and it comes from His Grace.


1. Using Dharana in Patanjali's Yoga Sutras
Dharana is used in the practice of samyama. Regarding samyama - it is a technique or condition one can practice that is made of the following components, that is, when all three of these components are present ( some say exercised) then one is practicing samyama - at the end of this we will discuss samyama on or for what? So, the three components are dharana, dhyana, and samadhi.

Dharana is fixity of the mind , dhyana or meditation, and samadhi as concentrated mind. Lets click down one more level:
Dharana is this fixity or attention , consciousness of a single object, idea, etc. and the other senses are withdrawn i.e. do not apprehend the object/idea at hand. some say one-pointed.
Dhyana is that continuous flow of the same knowledge/idea in Dharana - some call this meditation. Continuous flow of the one-pointedness found in Dharana.
Samadhi is when the object of meditation (dhyana) only shines forth in the mind, as if devoid of the thought and is considered concentrated mind ( not concentration or the act of, but again, resolved to simple one pointedness). When these three are in sync, and pointed to the same object of reference, then one is practicing samyama.

ॐनमःिशवाय

pranams

yajvan
21 November 2007, 04:52 PM
Hari Om
~~~~~
Namaste,

I thought to start the posts of the karikas found in the Vijnana Bhairava¹ Tantra. As I have mentioned this is also written as Vijnanabhaurva or Vigan Bhairav. No matter , the wisdom remains the same. One hundred and twelve karika's ( verses) of practical spiritual practices.

The dharana or the Upaya's begin with sutra 24, so I will number them in that manner. I will take the knowledge from the book, and also other writings from Swami Laksmanjoo, JaiDeva Singh ( one of his disciples), and other books that are relevant to offer a view for your kind consideration. I will also add the karikas of others of the same sutras to compare and contrast interpretations when warranted.

I am not the final authority on this matter, as I am a sadhu on the path, and these postings allow me to exercise my understanding accordingly.
My teacher has always said, teaching is learning twice. I hope to share what I may know in a fruitful manner... if one sees any blemishes in the knowledge, please point them out for clarification.


Sri Devi asks Shiva [Bhairava],
O God Of gods ( some like to write Lord of Lords as the text reads deva-deva), whose emblem is the trident (trisulanka)... How can that fullness (bharutakara) which is free fom any sense of direction, space and time (vyapadesa vivarjita) Bhairava be realized... How can para devi (Para-devi katham bhavet) be realized?

... Sri Bhairava uvaca (answers),

karika 24
The exhaling breath (prana) should ascend and the inhaling breath should decend, both forming visarga [consisting of 2 points]. Their state of fullness (is Found) by fixing then the two paces of their origin.

What is their two places of origin? The heart area. When one says the heart they do not mean the physical heart. It is the space in the chest area. Its called the space between the arm pits as its called, to give one a location. Another definition is 12 fingered spaces between the eyebrows to the heart area. So , the center of the breast area.
This visarga विसर्ग is sending forth , letting go , liberation , emission , discharge, hurling , throwing , shooting , casting. With the outward breath there is 'sa' and inword breath there is 'ha'. Many know this as hamsa mantra ( or swan) and this becomes so'ham over time , when repeated.

Now one is taking the breath from the hearth area. It is said the sadhu is reciting prana then. 'sa' + 'ha' and done in the heart area. This is apana + prana ( inward and outward) breath with mantra to facilitate.

So one just takes their time, inward and outward, and where these two locations meet, the heart area, that is where one puts their attention.
Like that , one becomes filled with Bhairava , so says this karika - Bhauravasya sthutih syat

I ask, who does not breathe? We all then have the opportunity...

1. Vijnana Bhairava - The Practice of Centering Awareness - this is the notes and teachings of Svami Laksmanjoo given to his sisya Prabha Devi in 1991; Then turned into publication in 2002 [ISBN 81-86569-35-9]; I am a better person for finding this book.


ॐनमःिशवाय

prana-ams

yajvan
22 November 2007, 06:08 PM
Hari Om
~~~~~~



In Kasmir Shaivism there are 3 upāyas for taking individual consciousness to that of Fullness of Being, To Brahman, to God Consciousness. They are the following:

Sambhavopaya [Sambhava - upāya] - this is considered the highest means
Saktopaya - this is considered the middle means
Anavopaya - this is considered entry levelWhy even bother mentioning this? The techniques in Vijnana Bhaitava run the gamut of these 3 approaches. This is the brilliance of the masters that teach this and it comes from His Grace.


Namaste,

Lets take a look at these upāyas mentioned above in a bit more depth.

In Kaśmir Śaivism [ some call Trika¹ Śaivism ] some say there are 3 upayas , others say there are 4 in Kasmir Saivism. I show the 4 below - you will see 1 and 1a. The two can be combined into 1 and then you can compare.

Who says there are 3? Svāmī Lakṣman-jū with his works from Ksemaraja, the sisya of Abhinavagupta. Who says there are 4? Radha Krisgen Kaw founder of Sharda Peetha Research centre Srinagar Kashmir. Are the definitions at odds with one another…absolutely not.

1. sāmbhavopāya (sāmbhava upāya)
This upāya The rise of Śiva consciousness by mere hints from the guru. It is via iccha śākti that the sādhu advances; the grace/will of the master. The sadhu gains entry into sāmaveśa ( posessed of the Divine), absorption of the individual consciousness in the Divine, without adapting any process. No dhyāna, mantra or any other aid is needed.
1a. sāmbhavopāya is also known as anupāya or 'without means or no upāya' - the way is without a way, as one person has said it. It does not really involve any process. Due to śaktipata or descent of grace in a very intense degree, everything needed for the realization, beginning from the liquidation of individual impurity down to the recognition of the state of Parameśvara may be achieved by the sādhu immediately and without going through any sādhana or discipline.

2. śākopāya (shakti-upāya )
the means of approach to the Divine through śakti, the ever-recurring contemplation of the pure thought of oneself being essentially Śiva or the Supreme ahaṁ.

3. āṇavopāya
āṇu अणु = fine , minute , atomic is known as 'atom' - which is another name for the individual jiva. This upāya is the means whereby the āṇu or the individual jiva uses his own kāraṇa-s or instruments i.e. senses, prana and manas for self-realization. It includes disciplines concerning the regulation of prana, japa, concentration, meditation, etc.

FYI
Techiques are contemplations/meditations that cannot be spoken of or recited. Whats that? An example of this would be amatra or the unstuck sound at the end of the bija-aksara Om. After Om there is silence, the fouth part of A-U-M____ this silence at the end. The sadhu is using this 4th part, that which cannot be sounded or spoken of as a vehicle.

Are there more then these? Yes. We can review them at a later point if there is interest.

words and references

1. Trika is a triad, a group of three divisions of Kashmir Shaivism, Agama, Spanda and Pratyabhijna shastras or agamas.
2. sāmaveśa - Being possessed by the Divine, absorption of the individual consciousness in the Divine.
3. Conversation from http://www.hindudharmaforums.com/showpost.php?p=25724&postcount=17 (http://www.hindudharmaforums.com/showpost.php?p=25724&postcount=17)

ॐनमःिशवाय

pranams,

Znanna
22 November 2007, 06:41 PM
karika 24
The exhaling breath (prana) should ascend and the inhaling breath should decend, both forming visarga [consisting of 2 points]. Their state of fullness (is Found) by fixing then the two paces of their origin.


There is a way of inhaling through one nostril whilst exhaling through the other at the same time, which I use to balance myself in meditation ... when breath is everything and there is no inside or out, just the flow of the breath ... and then not even the flow, just the balance. OM.


Thank you for posting this (and the subsequent passage, which reminds that the "heart" is not Heart.



Namaste,
ZN

yajvan
22 November 2007, 08:30 PM
Hari Om
~~~~~
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There is a way of inhaling through one nostril whilst exhaling through the other at the same time, which I use to balance myself in meditation ... when breath is everything and there is no inside or out, just the flow of the breath ... and then not even the flow, just the balance. OM.


Thank you for posting this (and the subsequent passage, which reminds that the "heart" is not Heart.

Namaste,
ZN

Namaste and hello ZN,
Good to hear you are practicing pranayam and you are experiencing results. It is the most simplest yet effective dharana I can think of. Many think , 'oh its too simple...', so the effects are less. This I believe is not seeing the gold one can harvest.

The balance, the centering or madhya¹, is the gold. Experiencing sama, neither the in or out breath, but in the rest of the middle, and this happens all but itself over time. Little effort , in fact no effort yields the best results.




1. मध्य or madhya = middlemost , intermediate , central, standing between two , impartial , neutral. What is one between? the in and out breath that is calm. Over time it blossoms to turiya.


pranams,

yajvan
26 November 2007, 12:55 PM
Hari Om
~~~~~~

And, of course, at the saMdhyA of pUraka and recaka there is always kumbhaka


notes on nothing :
shUnya (or shunya) is "empty, void, hollow, barren, desolate, deserted, destitute, distracted, vacant, absent, missing, free, with no certain object or aim, possessing nothing, wholly destitute, wholly alone or solitary, having no friends or companions, wanting, lacking, non-existent, vain, idle, unreal, nonsensical, ineffectual, insensible, bare, naked, guileless, innocent, or indifferent".
shUnya is "a void or vacuum", "vacuity, nonentity, or absolute non-existence", "nought, zero, a cipher, or space", "svarga or brahma", and shUnyA is "a barren woman".
shUnyatA is "emptiness, loneliness, desolateness, absence of mind, absence or want, distraction, vacancy, nothingness, non-existence, non-reality, or mAyA".

Namaste,
Sarabhanga offered the information above. This is from a Siva Sutras posting¹. Sarabhanga points out kumbaka and also shunya .
This approach is called out in the Vijnanabhaurava Tantra - karika (verse) 27. From our 3rd posting in this folder we started with karika 24; we will fill-in karika 25, and 26 in a new post. Since sarabhanga offered the core idea of karika 27, lets assume it is an auspicious sign to discuss this now.

Part of a triad of breathing i.e. pūraka (to take the breath inside), kumbhaka (to retain it), and recaka (to discharge it) - this is a pranayam technique [prāṇāyām प्राणायाम].

This kumbhaka - is that of a pot that holds or 'potting up' . In this method what it holds is the full breath as we breathe in -hold- then release or pūraka -> kumbhaka -> recaka. But it also holds nothing, emptiness, or shUnya from sarabhanga's post above.

So the whole process is pūraka -> kumbhaka -> recaka-> kumbhaka.
This pranayam pūraka (to take the breath inside), kumbhaka (to retain it), and recaka (to discharge it) and once discharged kumbhaka or shUnya of emptiness, vacancy of breath is done. So sometimes the pot [a.k.a your lungs] is full and sometimes the pot is empty.

The karika reads like this:
Kumbhita recita vapi purita va yada bhavet |
Tadante santranamasau saya shanta prakashate ||


Svāmī Lakṣman-jū suggest the following:
When [the energy of breath or prana] is retained or kumbhita, either outside or inside [ that is the recaka or discharging of air, or pūraka , the intake of air] at the end [of this practice] the peaceful state is revealed by means of Shakti.

So the question is how long does one hold the breath on the inward stroke pūraka + kumbhaka and outward stoke recaka + kumbhaka? The answer is what is comfortable…Swami Laksmanjoo says ' as long as one can do so easily'.


What then is brought to the aspirant?...shAnta or peace. He also says shAntanAma means SadAshiva. The state of SadAshiva is sAnta, absolutely peaceful and calm.


1. Siva Sutra post: http://www.hindudharmaforums.com/showpost.php?p=18361&postcount=50 (http://www.hindudharmaforums.com/showpost.php?p=18361&postcount=50)

ॐनमःिशवाय

pranams

yajvan
01 December 2007, 03:20 PM
Hari Om
~~~~~



Lets take a look at these upayas mentioned above in a bit more depth.

Techiques are contemplations/meditations that cannot be spoken of or recited. Whats that? An example of this would be amatra or the unstuck sound at the end of the bija-aksara Om. After Om there is silence, the fouth part of A-U-M____ this silence at the end. The sadhu is using this 4th part, that which cannot be sounded or spoken of as a vehicle.

Are there more then these? Yes. We can review them at a later point...


Namaste,
I thought to discuss the 39th karika. Bhairava speaks to Parviti and says,

O Bhairavi, by uttering the pranava and by meditating on the void at the end of the protracted sound, one attains the state of the Void by means of the Supreme Energy of the Void.

This is of interest as we all are aware of pranava¹, we all think of Om. In Kasmir Saivism OM is dear and recognized, yet they also see 3 types of pranava.
There's vaidika वैदिक pranava - Om or the Vedic pranava
śiva pranava - hum ( as in the mantra śivo-hum )
māyā pranava - hrīm ( pronounced hreem)

Now what Svāmī Lakṣman-jū says about this sutra is pick one to recite. He says to recite the mantra (mentally) in a prolonged way, plutānte, as it appears in the sutra itself; from the root plu प्लु to be lengthened or prolated.

He says the dharana² is in the merging of the sound at the end into silence. The meditation is on the silence at the end, the amatra, that is where one puts there awareness for the sutra to bear fruit.


More on this...
We know lots about pranava om or AUM , the benefits, etc.
A is Vaisvanara and owns waking state, is the first condition; As Om pervades the totality of the universe, so does Vaisvanara. Even in the Bhagavad-Gita , Krsna says ‘ Aksharanam Akarosmi’ or of the letters, the ‘A’ I am.
U is Taijasa, and the middle of AUM, and His sphere is dream.
M is Prajana, and His sphere is deep sleep where all the senses are collected and merged.

The last letter is _____ no letter! It’s turya तुर्य , the 4th. All bliss, non dual, pure consciousness, w/o parts or meter and is amatra³, without measure, unbounded.

For one knowing each one of these chatu-pada, the benefits (boons) are delightful:

For A (of AUM) brings fulfillment of desires, and becomes the first.
With U (of AUM) one becomes great in knowledge.
With M (of AUM) one is able to measure all and to comprehend all within himself.
With amatra one merges his self in the SELF and there is no more to do.


1. praNu (pra-nu) - 'to sound loudly' or 'to praise greatly'. It appears in the Rigveda, and in the Brahmanas and Upanishads praNu especially refers to the syllable oM. And throughout the Vedas, the term praNava (or praNavaka) implies the ekAkshara praNava, or Om.

2. In the Vijnana Bhairava the word dharana is not found. Yet people who teach this way use the word to describe the various methods called upadesa or nistaranga upadesha, undistracted instructions. Yet this upadesha is known as spiritual instruction, it also is known as Upaya , or skillful means, technique or way, means of approach.

This Jnanam Bandhah is the subject of HDF post and provides a reasonable commentary on this matter: Jnanam Bandhah and Mark Twain post (http://www.hindudharmaforums.com/showthread.php?t=2201&highlight=jnanam)

3. More on amatra see HDF post Amatra post (http://www.hindudharmaforums.com/showthread.php?t=2337)

ॐनमःिशवाय

pranams

yajvan
19 December 2007, 11:36 PM
Hari Om
~~~~~

Namaste,

I thought to post another dharana¹ I found interesting.


How often, or should I say, do you find yourself at times getting mad (krodha - anger, wrath) or with an excessive desire (kAma) or maybe confusion (moha - bewilderment , perplexity , distraction)?


In the Vijῆāna Bhairava Tantra there is a sloka that offers a way to take full advantage of this (these) conditions for the benefit of ones spiritual advancement. It is found with karika (verse) 101; Bhairava says,


kāma-krodha-lobha-moha-mada mātsarya-gocare|
buddhiṃ nistimitāṃ krtvā tat-tattvam-avaśișyate||

and Svāmī Lakṣman-jū's translation is thus:
If one makes ones's mind stable in the various states of desire, anger, greed, delusion intoxication or envy, then the Reality alone will remain which is underlying them.

Why is this interesting? The instruction is to focus one's awareness via the intellect evenly on the emotion or tendencies that are rising. But here is the technique.

One maintains evenness or nistimitam, motionless, without agitation at the point where the excitement ( of those emotions) rises or begins, just as its getting started. One detaches from the upward rise of anger and maintains that motionless state there.
He says ' when you put your unagitated consciousness on the point of these states, the supreme Lord is revealed to you'.

Yet they key is, one does this as the emotion is rising, you catch it before it blossoms.
This is not 'anger management', it is another gap where one has the opportunity to be in-between. Perhaps the physical part of the rise of anger happens, yet the selective control of putting your awareness at the start, provides the opportunity to experience the gap. If its done after the emotion has risen, one has lost the opportunity for that particular session and there is no need to purse the techniques further.

But you may say, how do I know when I am going to feel mad, anxious, desire-ful, etc etc.

The question is how can you anticipate when you get angry, or deluded, or in high anxiety? Many of us know when this happens. Some people get anxious in traffic, others may feel this way in an elevator. Some perhaps get angry with the dog is barking, others with a person they may not like. One may get mad waiting in line, another by missing their plane. All these conditions we know of and we can predict our behavior in these situations. So we know with some ( not 100%) certainty that a menu of things are going to be served up to us; now you can look forward to them to try this method.

Now, how wise is Barirava to know of life in modern society and offer ways to take maximimun use of these conditions.

This sloka also adds new value to Krsna's instruction of 'the same in pleasure and pain'. It allows me to see that sloka in two different lights. One before moksha to pracitce the above teachnique, and while in moksha, when perfect balance is achieved.

ॐनमःिशवाय

pranams

1. dharana - please view this post for more info: http://www.hindudharmaforums.com/showpost.php?p=18299&postcount=2 (http://www.hindudharmaforums.com/showpost.php?p=18299&postcount=2)

yajvan
03 January 2008, 06:11 PM
Hari Om
~~~~~~
Namaste

Many here on HDF like music. There is a dharana¹ offered in the Vijῆāna Bhairava tantra for this. Here is sutra or kārikā 73 and 41 that relates to music.

73rd kārikā

gītādi-viṣayāsvādasama-asukhyaikatatmanaḥ |
yoginas tanmayatvena manorūdhes-tad-ātmatā ||

Svāmī Lakṣman-jū's translation:
When the mind of a yogi is one with the unparalleled joy of music and other (aesthetic delights), then he is identified with it due to the expansion of his mind which has merged with it.

He suggests that the yogi whose mind is focused on the joy of the music while experiencing the melodious tunes, becomes united with that unparallelled bliss or asama saukhya = unequaled + health , happiness , felicity.


The mind is absorbed in the one collective sound, not the different notes. This is key , to experience it in whole. The notion is to collectively put ones awareness of the beauty of the sound. I have had some nice experiences with with this approach.

Another is the 41st kārikā
tantryādu-vādya-ṡabeṣu dīrgheṣu krama-samsthiteḥ |
Abanya-cetaḥ pratyante prara-vyima0vapur-bhavet ||

Svāmī Lakṣman-jū's translation:
If one listens with undivided attention to the sounds of all string instruments and
others which are played successively and are prolonged,
then one becomes absorbed in the supreme ether of consciousness (cidākaṡa)

A stringed instrument is tantrī. One thinks of a sitar, some a violin, or guitar or perhaps all in concert together. You can find separate sounds, yet there too is a collective sound that proceeds from the instrument at the depth of one's hearing.
So we are listening, aware of the collective sound produced; that should that is successive. When the awareness has captured this sound, then the listener becomes one with the supreme ether of consciousness (cidākaṡa).

There is no straining to do this, as Svāmī Lakṣman-jū says ' This can be heard by anyone'.


ॐनमःिशवाय

pranams

1. dharana - please view this post for more info: http://www.hindudharmaforums.com/sho...99&postcount=2 (http://www.hindudharmaforums.com/showpost.php?p=18299&postcount=2)

yajvan
14 January 2008, 11:11 PM
Hari Om
~~~~~



In Kasmir Shaivism there are 3 upayas for taking individual consciousness to that of Fullness of Being, To Brahman, to God Consciousness. They are the following:

Sambhavopaya [Sambhava - upaya] - this is considered the highest means
Saktopaya - this is considered the middle means
Anavopaya - this is considered entry level


namaste,

I thought to share this on śāmbhavopāya, known as the supreme means; for the sadhu that has that continunity of thoughtlessness and by the gace of ones master, that person enters the transcendental state. That person is defined thus:

A lightening bug shines only for himself; jewels shine not only for themselves but for a few others also. The stars shine for even more, the moon, even more also. Yet the sun shines for the whole universe. In this same way he who is established in the śāmbhavopāya state shines like the mid-day sun for the whole universe.

ॐनमःिशवाय


pranams

yajvan
06 February 2008, 02:00 PM
Hari Om
~~~~~

Namaste

Bhairava says in karika (kArikA कारिका ) 138 of the Vijnana Bhairava the following:

mānasaṃ cetanā śaktir ātmā ceti catustayam |
yadā priye pariksīnaṃ tadā tad bhairavaṃ vapuḥ ||

( O Dear One, Parvati) when the mind (mānasaṃ), the individual consciousness (cetanā) the vital energy (śaktir) and the limited self (ātmā) these 4 (catustayam ) have disappeared ( or when you leave these aside) then the nature of Bhairava appears.

So , if we look at this it is very profound. It suggests that these 4 things need to be dropped or dissolved if you will. For me it means they need to be transcended, gone beyond. But the implications are thus, if you pursue the removal of these 4 items WITH these 4 items, you continue to engage them again and again, tightening their knot on the asperant (sadhu).

What is one to do then? Technique... a technique to be able to engage in a upaya (upAya) that allows it to be cast aside once the goal is attained. The wise say it is like using a thorn in one hand to remove the thorn embedded in the other. Like that, the upayas can be considered as such.

I mention this as karika 138 is the last sloka Bharirava mentions to Sri Devi (Parvati) after offering the 112 upayas reviewed in this great work.


ॐ नमः िशवाय

pranams

yajvan
20 March 2008, 01:15 PM
Hari Om
~~~~~

Namaste,

I thought to add this karika ( kArikA कारिका) that I Have been delighted with over the past few days.

kArikA 130
bhayā sarvaṃ ravayati sarvago-vyāpak’khile |
iti bhairava śabdasya santatoccāraṇācchivaḥ ||

Swami Laksmanjoo's translation says,
Bhairava is the one who with fear (bhayā) makes everythng resound (ravayati), and who pervades the entrire universe. He who utters this word Bhairava unceasingly becomes śiva.

Now this fear bhI is "to fear" or "to be afraid or anxious" - Kasmir Shaivism's orientation is Bhairava liberates beings from the fear. Fear of what? samsara.
And he illumines everything with His bhA - bhA means "to shine" or "to be bright or luminous", "to shine forth or appear", "to be splendid or beautiful or eminent", "to show, exhibit, or manifest", or "to be or exist" - per sarabhanga.
rava (from ru) is "a roar, yell, cry, howl, song, hum, clamour, or outcry", "thunder" or "talk" or "any noise or sound (e.g. the ringing of a bell, etc.)" - per sarabhanga
Yet 'va' by itself is auspiciousness, strong , powerful, it is also the ocean , water.Swamiji says , when you become Bhairava what is there to fear?

We see some of Bhairava's characteristics: He is all pervading (vyāpakatva), He liberates us from fear (bhayā) of samsara or birth-after-birth and illumines everything with his light bhā. His inherent nature is aham, I Consciousness that is the core of us.¹

ॐनमःिशवाय

pranams

1. From the Tantraloka 1.96 - Bhairva syllables are defined. At the end of this explaination of Bhairava, the author Jayaratha quotes kArikA 130, the one from above, as an authority on this knowledge. The Vijnana Bhairava is one of the basic agamas for Kasmir Saivism and is considered the essence of the Rudrayamala Tantra. The great Abhinavagupta calls Vijnana Bhairava the Sivavijnanopanisad.
2. . Vijnana Bhairava - The Practice of Centering Awareness - this is the notes and teachings of Svami Laksmanjoo given to his sisya Prabha Devi in 1991; Then turned into publication in 2002 [ISBN 81-86569-35-9]; I am a better person for finding this book.

devotee
21 March 2008, 12:17 AM
Thanks a lot for this thread, yajvanji !

Regards

yajvan
28 March 2008, 08:07 PM
Hari Om
~~~~~~

I Have been reading and re-reading this kArikA:


38th kArikA from Vijnana Bhairava
anāhate pātra-karṇe bhagna- śabde sarvid-drute |
śabda-brahmaṇi niṣṇātaḥ paraṃ brahmādhigacchati ||


It says (per Svami Laksmanjoo) He attains the supreme Brahman who is deeply merged in the brahman that is sound (śabda-brahmaṇi) which is vibrating within; whithout striking (anāhate) and is perceived by the ear; this sound is un-interrupted like that of a waterfall.


This Ahata or अनाहत - which is unbeaten ( hence unstruck), unwounded , intact; also considered new and unbleached (as cloth).
It is a sound (śabda) that continues in ones mind, and is seemly heard, or perceived by the ear, yet is internal to the sadhu.

This realtes nicley to the Mandukya Upanishad, the last sloka where it calls out the that which has no parts , the 4th, turiya. It is the 4th part of Omkara. A U M __. This is called amAtrA¹ or without measure, like being unstruck anāhate, from kArikA 38 above.


In these instances we are pointing to the SELF, the 4th, to sounds that are unstuck, and to the silence that becomes experinced via these approaches.


And what of this Silence? Silence is an expression of akasha (ākāśa , my favorite). Akāśa an expression of Kham bija vibration (from ख kha) and that , the expression of Brahman, of Om; And what of that? the unstruck sound of AUM, called amAtrA², the 4th, turiya - being more available to the sadhu.


In both cases, a vehicle to the 4th, to Brahman... a beautiful( to me) confluence of ideas that support each other.


So , I was wondering , has anyone had the opportunity to hear this sound?

ॐनमःिशवाय

pranams


1. mAtrA or मात्रा is a measure (of any kind) , quantity , size , duration , number , degree ; a unit of time, etc
1a. ALso मात्र mAtra - the full or simple measure of anything , the whole or totality
Then a-mAtrA or is then without measure , boundless.
2. Also reviewed with this HDF post: http://www.hindudharmaforums.com/showpost.php?p=18487&postcount=8

Arjuna
23 April 2008, 04:00 PM
Anahata-nada in Kaula texts has a technical meaning which is referred to in commentary to the 3rd Ahnika of Tantraloka (if i remember it properly). That is the sound of visarga in samghatta.

yajvan
25 April 2008, 11:29 PM
Hari Om
~~~~~

Anahata-nada in Kaula texts has a technical meaning which is referred to in commentary to the 3rd Ahnika of Tantraloka (if i remember it properly). That is the sound of visarga in samghatta.

Namaste Arjuna.
Can you perhaps offer the sloka?

pranams

yajvan
08 July 2008, 07:23 PM
Hari Om
~~~~~




Bhairava says in karika (kArikA कारिका ) 138 of the Vijnana Bhairava the following:

mānasaṃ cetanā śaktir ātmā ceti catustayam |
yadā priye pariksīnaṃ tadā tad bhairavaṃ vapuḥ ||

( O Dear One, Parvati) when the mind (mānasaṃ), the individual consciousness (cetanā) the vital energy (śaktir) and the limited self (ātmā) these 4 (catustayam ) have disappeared ( or when you leave these aside) then the nature of Bhairava appears.

If we look at this it is very profound...What is one to do then? Use a technique... a technique to be able to engage in a upaya (upAya) that allows it to be cast aside once the goal is attained. The wise say it is like using a thorn in one hand to remove the thorn embedded in the other. Like that, the upayas can be considered as such.

Namaste

Kaśmir śaivism is very much interested in madhya¹ - the middle, the central condition of Consciousness. This is considered the home of turiya. It is the general wisdom that the Ultimate (anuttara) pervades everything, there is no place, time, space, that it is not. So it is omnipresent. Yet just as this anuttara is everywhere, our awareness gets pulled everywhere to various objects.


Most if not all of the Vijñāna Bhairava is interested in bring the native ( the experient) to this level of awareness - to allow one's fractured awareness to rest in this madhya . As one reads and re-reads, it becomes clear that many of the kārikā-s are offered with this in mind. That is, to direct one's awareness to the middle state, madhya, the in-between. It is here that one can experience turiya. Not as an object to be inspected, but as the core of one's Being.

How could one inspect this anyway for IT is the inspector, IT is the Consciousness used for inspection. So what does one experience? In a word nirvikalpa¹. If our lives are filled with diversity, this is the condition of no diversity, a condition of Unity that allows the diversity to play out.

We have used this following analogy before i.e. this nirvikalpa, turiya is like the movie screen , pure white, no boundaries, that allows the 'show' (life) to play out on it. In this case this nirvikalpa is infinite in size, without boundaries, with no constraints what so ever, the nature of Bhairava.

This is the subject at hand - of Śrī Devī's conversation with Bhairava within the 112 kārikā-s offered in the Vijñāna Bhairava. To discuss an inform in very terse format how one may be able to experience the middle, madhya.


pranams


words

madhya मध्य - middle most middlemost , intermediate , standing between two , impartial , neutral
nirvikalpa निर्विकल्प - free from change or differences; admitting no doubt , not wavering

yajvan
21 July 2008, 02:29 PM
Hari Om
~~~~~

Namaste,
I thought I might add one additional piece of information on the Vijñāna Bhairava kārikā-s.

According to Svāmi Laksmanjoo, a complete Śaivāgama (Śiva + āgama) consists of the following pāda or parts (pāda is a foot, and also a quarter , a fourth part):

ritual or kriyā
way of living life or charyā
knowledge, wisdom, philosophy or vidyā
and that of of spirtual pratice sādhana or yoga

The Vijñāna Bhairava is only focused on spiritual practice - sādhana¹ or yoga. Through the kārikā-s offered , the intent is quite straight forward. The kārikā-s are offered as bhāvanā¹, infusion of the Divine into the sādhaka¹.

This is why many rejoice in reading the kārikā-s. To advance ones understanding and practice to the center or madhya, which encourages pratiprasava¹.

The 20th kārikā suggests the following: śaivīmukham ihocyate. That is śaivī+mukham and ihocyate is ucyate¹ or uc + yate.
Śaivī is śakti or Śrī Devī + mukham¹ is mukha - mouth, opening or aperature. And ucyate is moving, connected or joined.

So this is saying, Śakti is the entrance, the suitable way to join with Śiva. Or another way of viewing it is Śrī Devī (śakti) is the delightful (uc) entrance (mukha) to Śiva.
At that moment the bhāvanā of the sādhaka becomes one with Śiva or as it says in the śloka, tadāsau Śivarūpī syāt.

pranams

words used

ucyate = yat यत् to seek to join one's self with going , moving, connected with + uc उच् to be suitable , suit , fit ; to take pleasure in , delight in , be fond of.
mukha मुख- opening aperture , entrance into or egress out of ; the mouth , face.
bhāvanā भावना- reflection , contemplation ; finding by combination or composition ; saturating any powder with fluid , steeping , infusion
sādhaka साधक- effective , efficient , productive of, accomplishing , fulfilling , completing , perfecting , finishing i.e.
the person practicing sādhana leading straight to a goal , guiding well , establishing Reality; worship, adoration
pratiprasava प्रतिप्रसव- return to the original state

Srikantha
01 August 2008, 06:01 AM
For me personally Vigyana Bhairava was very difficult to grasp, it was only with the aid of the Malinivijayaottara that I began to understand some elements of its teachings. Somadeva's partial translation of the Malinivijayottara is a must in its study.

For those interested:

Somadeva Vasudeva. 2004. The Yoga of the Malinivijayottaratantra.institut Francais de Pondicherry [Collection Indologie -97]. Pondicherry.

yajvan
01 August 2008, 06:01 PM
Hari Oṁ
~~~~~



For me personally Vigyana Bhairava was very difficult to grasp, it was only with the aid of the Malinivijayaottara that I began to understand some elements of its teachings. Somadeva's partial translation of the Malinivijayottara is a must in its study.

For those interested:

Somadeva Vasudeva. 2004. The Yoga of the Malinivijayottaratantra.institut Francais de Pondicherry [Collection Indologie -97]. Pondicherry.

Namaste Srikantha
I will take a look ... I have been looking for a author on Malinivijayottara and will pursue your recommendation.

Just a note - for me Vijāna Bhairava has been quite comfortble to read and practice. Perhaps svāmī Lakmanjoo's offer may be of help?


pranams

Srikantha
01 August 2008, 09:13 PM
Jaya Ho Yajvan!

There are two Malinivijaottaras out there, the Hindi [Paramhansa Mishra] is published by Sampurnanda University and the English is as mentioned before. The Sanskrit variety is easily accessible online [muktabodha database].

Maybe we should discuss this more candidly after you partake of the teachings of Maliniviyaottara. I have not yet studied Lakshmana Joo's works, I will do so as soon as I finish my study of Svacchanda Tantra.

I think my biggest difficutly comes from the lack of familiarity with Hindi and Sanskrit. I've taught myself basic Hindi but I think that is not enough to read a work like Vigyana Bhairava. Often, the English equivalents are either too fanciful and therefore out of context or do not seem to be a good rendition of Sanskrit [based on the little I know]

For instance I would see shasana as lesson but is sometimes translated as introduction. Some of the Hindi translations are quite good, that is, if they arent censored. I hope to make the effort soon and start engaging also in the study of Sanskrit Grammar but that would be a different topic.

Getting back to the point, I would also express another view as to why I find Vigyana Bhairava somewhat difficult. I cannot let go of the philosophy of speech, as it is quite important to this school. Para, Pashyanti, Madhyama and Vaikhari. As you read a word, you utter it in your mind [Vaikhari equivalent of a word being spoken out or being heard] then as you proceed to "garland" those words you start formulating the most primitive framework of the idea. But then, what is that idea in its totality within the Para context?

I would assume that to understand Vigyana Bhairava (in the Para context) is to understand some of the more difficult topics we encounter in life [I assume Vigyana Bhairava is a valid scripture, it is my opinion that is a paragon of Shruti (no pun intended :D)]. I think the Para becomes evident once elements of the Vigyana Bhairava are recognized outside of of the text, in its topical environment. Some realizations are made clear after the study of Malinivijaottara was my implication here.

I hope the above ramblings are of some use.

yajvan
02 August 2008, 12:28 PM
Hari Om
~~~~~



I would assume that to understand Vigyana Bhairava (in the Para context) is to understand some of the more difficult topics we encounter in life . I think the Para becomes evident once elements of the Vigyana Bhairava are recognized outside of of the text, in its topical environment. Some realizations are made clear after the study of Malinivijaottara was my implication here.

I hope the above ramblings are of some use.

Namaste Srikantha
thank you for your post. IMHO the part of understanding Vijñāna Bhairava is yes, by reading, but more importantly by practice. This I find (the most) rewarding.

Regarding reading... I am a novice at best with sanskrit. I am teaching myself as I go. My 'practice' comes with my posts, study, etc. taking apart words, knowing thier roots; again even calling myself a noivce is 5 steps above my abilities, yet I continue to move forward.

Hense good translations are my best friends. I end up buying several books on the same subject matter to view the translations, approach and insights from the authors to augment my study.

I find it least enjoyable to read the [I]academic renditions of some of the great works. The most enjoyable come from the muni's with direct experience of the Supreme. This is clearly called out in the Upanishads - learning and listening from the Brahmavit is much more preferred (Kathopanishad I.8)

pranams

Srikantha
04 August 2008, 06:22 AM
Jaya Ho Yajvan,

I dont think there is anything substantial worth adding in replying to this post of yours, as there are generally very little differences in our views.

I am unsure about your notion of reading, a variety of different translations of the same work. I mean in theory that may make sense, but it can often lead to the converse effect; where the individual is even more confused than he ought to be.

There are many ways I can discuss this, but most of them take a fairly personal route and I am sure that would be an unnecessary addition to this dialogue [very difficult to argue against; since one's personal experiences is just that, their own.]

I am glad that you appreciated Swami Lakshmana's work, it has inspired me to put some of his works on my "to read list". I guess I am a little dismayed by translations looking at how a simple phrase such as:

athayoganushAsanaM [Patanjali Yoga Sutra 1.1]

has been translated, giving so much variety from one text to another. Thus my hessitation for emulating that route.

yajvan
04 August 2008, 01:23 PM
Hari Oṁ
~~~~~~



.

I am unsure about your notion of reading, a variety of different translations of the same work. I mean in theory that may make sense, but it can often lead to the converse effect; where the individual is even more confused than he ought to be.


Namaste Srikantha,

I see your point on confusion that may enter the picture. Yet for me and my experience the new perspectives are very valuable.
I think of the Bhavagad gita and on how many views I have read. It suggests the clarity of the author, their honed intellect and their tradition. It also suggests in some cases just a different POV. In other words I like the notion of holding opposite views in my mind to apprecaite the differences; yet like all of us we can then choose from the knowledge that resinates as most insightful, yet it does not negate the other POV's.

If one compares Abhinavagupta's work Gītārtha-Saṁgraha to say Jñānadeva's (some call Jñāneśvarī) view in his Bhāvārtha Dipikā they are different in approach. Yet compared to Śrīla Prabhupāda, the views (and word definitions) differ substantially.

One translation I use regularly is Mahṛṣi Mahesh Yogi's book, yet he chose to keep the translation to the first 6 kanda-s. Mahṛṣi views Arjuna as confounded in the beginning dialog with Kṛṣṇa. Yet as the conversation continues Arjuna's clarity improves, based upon the profound questions he asks Kṛṣṇa. Other authors e.g. S.Radakrishan sees Arjuna's confusion as systemic. Like that these differences gives one a different perspective. Yet I see your point - if one is struggling with the concept of "why is this conversation taking place on a battlefield and , hey is it really a battle field ? and, wait a minute I am not certain of how this discussion fits inside of this great work , the Mahabharata" ' - yes I see a whole bucket of confusion ready to boil over.

I think the difference for me is one of reading a book and one of studying it. My orientation has been that of study. When I do run into confusion, I put the book down and try to figure the issue out. If it does not come I leave it alone for a while. Over time the issue or confusion resolves itself by popping up in a different work or reading.

An example that occured this week. There was a Upaniṣad passage that was quoted by several authors ( months ago) yet they never gave the exact name of the Upaniṣad or its śloka location. I took to find it, but was not successful. This week the śloka appeared in my studies. It came at the right time and within the right conditions. This was after a very long time of waiting and be attentive to this inquiry. Would I have preferred the answer came months ago ? Sure. Yet I find this happening quite regularly in my studies.

Thank you again for your post and look forward to more of your writings.

pranams

yajvan
10 August 2008, 10:19 PM
Hari Oṁ
~~~~~

Namaste ,


I thought I would share this one śloka with you. As I see it , it refers to keeping one's mental health.

In the Vijñāna Bhairava, kārikā 125, offers a view on how one can keep a balanced mind in this world. It says,
samaḥ śatrau mitre ca samo mānāvamānayoḥ |
brahmanaḥ pari-purṇbatvād iti jñātvā sukhī bhavet ||
That is,
have the same (samaḥ) feelings towards foes or friends ( śatrau and mitre) in honor and dis-honor (mānāvamānayoḥ).
(Why so?) because you are always full (brahmanaḥ pari-purṇbatvād) you are this fullness (pūrṅa) of brahman.
Thus (iti) if you understand this (jñātvā) you then will gain entry to that blissful/happy/prosperous (sukhī) state of being (bhavet).
Now what sate of being is being referenced? That of Bhairava.

It says recognize you are this fullness, of what then does it matter whether you are with friend or foe, or in honor or dis-honor?
This fullness (bhuma) is not dependent upon these conditions.

Kṛṣṇa tells us similar wisdom in Chapter 5 verse 20 of the Bhāgavad gītā; Yet the focus of Chapter 2 discusses the person of balanced intellect and this samness in pleasure or pain.

So for one following Hari or Hara , this wisdom is applicable and most practical. Both Hari and Hara are rooted in हृ hṛ - to take away, carry off. And what are thay taking away? One's sorrows and igorance.
hari oṁ हरिॐ hara oṁ हरॐ

pranams

yajvan
03 September 2008, 02:06 PM
Hari Oṁ
~~~~~


Namaste,

I have been studying the Vijñāna Bhairava kārikā-s for some time. Yet I always wondered, why did Bhairava (Śiva) choose 112 kārikā-s ( or sūtra-s) to offer his clear (śuddha) approach of the upāya-s¹ ?
What one needs to be aware of is that no number is given without meaning. Why did Śiva not offer 100 kārikā-s, or 108, or for that matter 115? What is the significance of 112?

From A Jyotish view

I can appreciate the sum of 1+1+2 = 4. Four is the first house of mokśa from a Jyotish point of view. And if we take a trika (3) view of this, the trine (or 120º) to the 4th house is the 8th, another mokśa house, and the next trine is the 12th house, another mokśa house; albeit it is 3 (trine) X 4 (house) = 12 , and the 12th is mokśa house. So from a Jyotish orientation I was comfortable.


Yet the 112 still did not make sense to me; So began my search to find the answer. This came by Abhinavagupta in his work Parā-trīśikā Vivaraṇa, explaining the 9th śloka.

He does not address Vijñāna Bhairava kārikā-s directly yet provides the meaningful gloss to explain the significance of 112. The 112 is the full breath of ones being; our existence on this good earth and in the universe. It is considered a span of 112 marma¹. Now this word marma is used as a joint, and in the context of the sloka of Parā-trīśikā Vivaraṇa, it is considered a finger, or a dimension.

So this 112 marma is 112 fingers. This 112 is explained as 80 + 15 + 11 + 6 =112, yet you will see in a moment how this is slightly adjusted. Without taking apart each number, let me just supply an overview of what the 112 finger dimensions encapsulate; that of our various śarīra¹ (bodies) stretching-up to the dimension of 112 fingers:

spanda śarīra this is the subtlest , the spanda or that vibration or throb found in the unmanifest. Pure sattā ( Pure Being). When anuttara is oriented to external expansion, this throb, spanda is its nature.
sākta śarīra - is energy (śākti) body
sūkṣma (also called puryaṣtaka) śarīra - this is the subtle body; I am not in favor of using this world subtle as it is 'squishy' by definition; let me explain the best I can. This , as I see it, is pur+yaṣṭa+ka - with whom (ka) + the body ( pur) + that is entrusted (yaṣta ); it is this intelligence that carries the jiva from one birth to another. To go deeper ( and I will avoid that) Abhinavagupta suggests this puryaṣtaka śarīra is made up of the tanmatra-s i.e. sound, form, smell, etc.
para śarīra - causal body
sthūla śarīra - we know this as the 'gross' body - our physical frame , a heap (of mass).

This 112 starts from the toe to the top of the head which we know as the body sthūla śarīra then adds in the additional fingers stopping at each station i.e. sūkṣma śarīra + para śarīra + sākta śarīra and finally arriving at spanda śarīra , giving 112 stations.

It is increasingly interesting to me that the sequence of 112 offered in this approach i.e. sthūla śarīra + sūkṣma śarīra + para śarīra + sākta śarīra and finally arriving at spanda śarīra is the following:

sthūla śarīra = 84 fingers
sūkṣma śarīra the 84 motioned + 12 more for 96
para śarīra - the 96 mentioned + 12 more = 108
sākta śarīra the 108 mentioned + 2 more = 110
spanda śarīra the 110 mentioned + 2 more = 112 , the final destination of paramātman.

Abhinavagupta addresses these 5, as the 5 folds of the body from the external, to the internal, to the Supreme, anuttara.

Hence Bhairiava's approach in the Vijñāna Bhairava kārikā-s is to offer the path one can take to the final destination of the Supreme, anuttara. Vijñāna Bhairava kārikā-s allows one to start wherever he/she is on the path, and progress to the 112th marma.

ॐमहेश्वरायनमः
oṁ maheśvarāya namaḥ

pranams
words and references

śuddha शुद्ध - clean, clear , pure, pure spirit, free from error , faultless , blameless , right , correct , accurate
upāya-s उपायthat by which one reaches one's aim , a means or expedient
dhāraṇā धारणा- undistracted instruction; collection or concentration of the mind (joined with the retention of breath); the act of holding , bearing , wearing , supporting , maintaining ;firmness , steadfastness , righteousness
marman मर्मन्- a vital spot; the joint of a limb , any joint or articulation ; mortal spot , vulnerable point , any open or exposed or weak or sensitive part of the body.
śarīra शरीर - body, or frame; support; also " that which is easily destroyed or dissolved " which is another name for our physcal body. ( the garment a woman wears to cover her śarīra is considered a śari ).
sthūla स्थूल - large , thick , stout , massive , bulky ; the gross body
The approach of the Vijñāna Bhairava kārikā-s - Śaivī mukhaṃ Ihocyate - Śhakti ( Śrī Devī) is the entrance door (mukhaṃ or mouth, opening ) to Śiva. This is said in Vijñāna Bhairava , the 20th and 21st kārikā, Śiva is known through Śakti
Additional views of the 5 śarīra at this HDF post: http://www.hindudharmaforums.com/showpost.php?p=24347&postcount=9 (http://www.hindudharmaforums.com/showpost.php?p=24347&postcount=9)
hari oṁ हरिॐ

yajvan
22 October 2008, 11:20 AM
hariḥ oṁ
~~~~~~



The 20th kārikā suggests the following: śaivīmukham ihocyate. That is śaivī+mukham and ihocyate is ucyate¹ or uc + yate.
Śaivī is śakti or Śrī Devī + mukham¹ is mukha - mouth, opening or aperature. And ucyate is moving, connected or joined.

So this is saying, Śakti is the entrance, the suitable way to join with Śiva. Or another way of viewing it is Śrī Devī (śakti) is the delightful (uc) entrance (mukha) to Śiva. At that moment the bhāvanā of the sādhaka becomes one with Śiva or as it says in the śloka, tadāsau Śivarūpī syāt.


Namaste

The above kārikā is very insightful. The 20th śloka is complimented by the 21st. Bhairava again reiterates Śiva is known by Śakti. It seems simple enough but when one ponders it, it still may be elusive. It is my opinion Bhairava is saying the following.
Śiva is perfect consciousness, pure consciousness, perfect being (sattā). To know Me (Śiva suggests) to know this perfection, it must be accomplished through bhairavī.

Hence what is bhairavī? We know bhairavī is śakti, Śiva's energy. But still when it comes to our use, what is it? It is Awareness. Awareness is the active (śakti) part of Śiva as Pure Consciousness. It is awareness that can be directed, utilized. But how?

That is the notion of dhāraṇa-s that have been discussed thought this post. I have called them dhāraṇa-s , but Bhairava calls them nistaraṅga upadeśa¹ or undistracted instructions. It is applying this awareness , this active consciousness (śakti) as a technique, a upāya. This active awareness is then applied and aimed at goal - to experience Śiva perfect consciousness, pure consciousness, pure awareness.
Hence this is the notion of the Vijñāna Bhairava kārikā-s, to offer 112 different ways to apply śakti, via a dhāraṇa ( method or meditation) that results in experiencing one's own SELF, sattā, Being, Bhuma (fullness), the state of Bhairava.
That is why Śiva says in śloka 20 and 21, perhaps in code, that Śiva is known by Śakti i.e. śaivīmukham ihocyate.

pranams

words used
ucyate = yat यत् to seek to join one's self with going , moving, connected with + uc उच् to be suitable, suit, fit; to take pleasure in, delight in, be fond of.
mukha मुख- opening aperture , entrance into or egress out of ; the mouth , face.
bhāvanā भावना- reflection, contemplation; finding by combination or composition; saturating any powder with fluid , steeping , infusion
sādhaka साधक- effective , efficient , productive of, accomplishing , fulfilling , completing , perfecting , finishing i.e.
the person practicing sādhana leading straight to a goal , guiding well , establishing Reality; worship, adoration
nistaraṅga upadeśa - called out in the 139th kārikā of the Vijñāna Bhairava
upāya उपाय - a strategy, way, means, approach, method; that by which one meets their aim.

sunyatisunya
15 November 2008, 06:00 PM
Hello everyone,
I've been enjoying your discussion here on the
Vijnanabhairavatantra

I have a small but significant question
which someone might be able
to answer.

The text mentions in several places
that if one is to dive deeply into at least one of the
methods, -
he will become a "perfect gnostic person"
and achieve spiritual bliss and Union with the Divine.

~ My problem is of the starting point ~

Should I pick one technique and focus
only on that, forgetting all others until
definitive "results" are experienced?

Or should I pick a handful and practice
them at different times in the day
in order to raise the intensity of it
and draw closer to the Self
through constant effort?

Since finding the text, I have been very devoted
to understanding it, and the techniques given,
and have already played around with many.

So, is it better to pick one technique
and focus on it alone -
or is it better to practice a handful
at different times?

Much thanks to anyone reading
or responding.
Namaste.

yajvan
15 November 2008, 07:00 PM
hariḥ oṁ
~~~~~~




The text mentions in several places
that if one is to dive deeply into at least one of the
methods, -
he will become a "perfect gnostic person"
and achieve spiritual bliss and Union with the Divine.

~ My problem is of the starting point ~

Should I pick one technique and focus
only on that, forgetting all others until
definitive "results" are experienced?




Namaste sunyatisunya

Before answering I'd like to ask a few questions if I may... this will help I think with the starting point.

Today do you practice a technique ? Do you meditate ? Do you do japa or ajapā. What are your experiences? Do you have a teacher or instructor?

I ask this to see how your practice is going. Are you transcending? Have you experienced this? I mention this because it is not only choosing which kārikā to begin with i.e. which upāya¹ or dhāraṇā¹ to consider, but also the things that accompany one's practice e.g. when to practice and where.

Pending your experience there are 3 entry points:


śāmbhavopāya
śāktopāya
āṇavopāya

Previous posts¹ within this subject of Vijñāna Bhairava outline these three approaches.

Hence knowing a little more will help. But that said, If you are new to this approach and wish to start, I would recommend the 24th kārikā. It is one of my favorites. It's simple, effective and it is the first one that Śrī Bhairava mentions to Śrī Devī.
This would be considered an āṇavopāya approach. It is so simple , that it is elegant. I think this 24th kārikā is reviewed in the prior posts. I will look and check. If not called out I will post it.

pranams

words & references


upāya-s उपाय that by which one reaches one's aim , a means or expedient



dhāraṇā धारणा - undistracted instruction; collection or concentration of the mind (joined with the retention of breath); the act of holding , bearing , wearing , supporting , maintaining ;firmness , steadfastness , righteousness

The following words below can be reviewed at these HDF posts:
1. http://www.hindudharmaforums.com/showpost.php?p=18339&postcount=4
2. http://www.hindudharmaforums.com/showpost.php?p=18299&postcount=2

śāmbhavopāya
śāktopāya
āṇavopāya

sunyatisunya
15 November 2008, 09:58 PM
hariḥ oṁ
~~~~~~
Namaste sunyatisunya

Before answering I'd like to ask a few questions if I may... this will help I think with the starting point.

Today do you practice a technique ? Do you meditate ? Do you do japa or ajapā. What are your experiences? Do you have a teacher or instructor?

I ask this to see how your practice is going. Are you transcending? Have you experienced this?

Thank you for responding.

I have been practicing various techniques throughout the past few months. Recently my overall understanding has crystallized to some extent and I have experienced some few "results" which have assured me that the time is ripe to dive into the practice wholeheartedly.

The nature of the experiential "results" is the cessation of thought-constructs ("vikalpas") and the isolation of consciousness from its involvement-identification-attachment with mind, body, ego, etc. This happened through various techniques - the 2nd dharana, the 64th dharana, and various others etc.

I'm not sure what ajapa means (I am from a non-religious, Western background with no understanding of Sanskrit other than what I have picked up from books) but for japa - recitation, right? - I have playfully experimented with the recitation of a-u-m, Bhairava, etc., as recommended in various dharanas.

I have no teacher.

The question, "Are you transcending?" is somewhat vague to me. I could interpret it in numerous ways which might not be in accordance with the actual sense in which you meant it. I have had moments where pure consciousness transcended the mind, at which time I "knew" intuitively (not through any thought process related to gathered language) that "I" (as consciousness) am separate from the mind, which in turn implied separate and distinct from the ego, limited self, whatever you wish to call it.


I mention this because it is not only choosing which kārikā to begin with i.e. which upāya or dhāraṇā to consider, but also the things that accompany one's practice e.g. when to practice and where.

Pending your experience there are 3 entry points:

śāmbhavopāya
śāktopāya
āṇavopāyaPrevious posts within this subject of Vijāna Bhairava outline these three approaches.

Hence knowing a little more will help. But that said, If you are new to this approach and wish to start, I would recommend the 24th kārikā. It is one of my favorites. It's simple, effective and it is the first one that Śrī Bhairava mentions to Śrī Devī.
This would be considered an āṇavopāya approach. It is so simple , that it is elegant. I think this 24th kārikā is reviewed in the prior posts. I will look and check. If not called out I will post it.

pranams



Yes, the 24th dharana immediately attracted me.

I hope I provided enough information regarding my practice for you to assess. I have a tendency to write too much, so maybe that's also the case.

yajvan
15 November 2008, 11:36 PM
hariḥ oṁ
~~~~~~

Namaste sunyatisunya

you mention


I'm not sure what ajapa means (I am from a non-religious, Western background with no understanding of Sanskrit other than what I have picked up from books) but for japa - recitation, right? - I have playfully experimented with the recitation of a-u-m, Bhairava, etc., as recommended in various dharanas.


Ajapa is mental practice, done consciously in the mind/awareness and not out loud.

you say

I have had moments where pure consciousness
very good - this is a indication of transcending.

you also mention

This happened through various techniques - the 2nd dharana, the 64th dharana, and various others etc
I will assume the 2nd kārikā ( verse or sūtra) means the 25th kārikā.
If so, fine. If you are having success with it that too is good.

Here is my recommendations for your consideration...
1. Choosing a proper time for practice. please consider this post.
http://www.hindudharmaforums.com/showthread.php?t=622

Choosing the time of the day supports and helps with the technique. Two favorable times
Morning is Brahma Muhurta Sandhya
Sunset called Mahesha Sandhya
The post recommended in point 1 will review these times and their meaning/benefits.2. Choosing the amount of time

In the beginning chose the amount of time that you can be consistent with, day-in-day-out. Perhaps 10 min to 15 min. per sitting? You will need to decide - but avoid 5 min one day, 15 min the next, 3 min the 5th day... this is not the approach.
If you plan on dabbling in this (as a sport, or amusement) , then I would avoid any serious time commitment. Yet if you now feel it is your time to begin sādhana, then consistency with time and place will be some fundamental keys for progress.3. Well begun is half done - my teacher has said this many times. That is, choose one technique and stick with it for some time. What is some time? Months and when you see results.

Now with breathing (prana) techniques, these are the 24th 25th, 26th and 27th kārikā-s as a family. IMHO we stay with 24th and I think you said the 26th you are doing today? Stay with these one or two until they bear fruit for you. If you started with the 26th and are steady in that, stay with it for some time. That is, you see progress. Progress is measured inside and outside of the practice. More on this later.
I recommend not jumping all over the place with the kārikā-s; Svāmi Śivānanda and well as my teacher has said we only dig one well at a time. That is, we stay with the practice till we get water (results). Śrī Bhairava mentions in the 140th kārikā ' If one is established in only of them (dhāraṇā-s) , one becomes Bhairava Himself.'4. We take it easy

That is, very simple. That is it, the recommendation of simplicity. Expect nothing. Just be innocent about the practice. Why so? Innocent Consciousness is closer to pure consciousness. Avoid ' I hope, I wish, I can't wait to see' approaches to the techniques. Just be innocent and stay with the practice. Such a simple instruction that many miss. Again this is innocence when you sit down to practice - not when you are dynamic in the activity of work, school or play.you mention

I have no teacher. It would be good to find one. Having some one with personal interest in your progress. This is a blessing.

We can answer some of your questions here on HDF, but a teacher, instructor, or guru is the blessing.



Let's stop there. Please ask questions as you see fit about the information offered above.


pranams

sunyatisunya
16 November 2008, 12:30 AM
2. Choosing the amount of time
In the beginning chose the amount of time that you can be consistent with, day-in-day-out. Perhaps 10 min to 15 min. per sitting? You will need to decide - but avoid 5 min one day, 15 min the next, 3 min the 5th day... this is not the approach.
If you plan on dabbling in this (as a sport, or amusement) , then I would avoid any serious time commitment. Yet if you now feel it is your time to begin sādhana, then consistency with time and place will be some fundamental keys for progress.

I have been, in a very general sense, practicing watchfulness as much as possible throughout all my days. It is my feeling that one cannot devote 15 minutes to seated meditation and then spend the other 23hrs and 45mins in a state of careless unconsciousness. Also, I quite literally have the entire day, every day, to practice any given meditation. Being so devoted to the "Goal", fifteen minutes seems child's play and by no means enough time. I regularly spend hours at a time sitting in contemplation after reading various translations and commentaries on the Vijnanabhairava. My practice of the "dark night" dharana (64th, verse 87 as per Jaideva Singh's translation) a few weeks ago was about an hour. I'm considering stretching that to two hours and making it a nightly thing as I feel very drawn to it.

Please allow me some time to respond to the rest of your post and to also read the other thread for which you provided a link.

sunyatisunya
17 April 2009, 12:39 AM
Hi guys,

Sorry I haven't posted in a while.

I haven't re-read any of my old posts but I'm going to share what's been going on since we're all interested in this stuff.

I purchased Swami Lakshmanjoo's Vijnana Bhairava - The Manual for Self-Realization which is a seven disc audio set and complete manuscript of the talks. It's easily the best practical exposition of the text for actual practitioners. I highly recommend it to all those here who have the $125 (plus shipping) to pay for it.

My one complaint is that John Hughes, who I had spoken to via email about the discs/book in order to make sure it wasn't a rip-off, has since not replied to any of my other emails. I had sent a few after purchasing to share how excited and pleased I was with the purchase and never received a reply. I consider this bad business and rude, although I understand that he has better things to do than chat with me online. Has anyone else spoken to anyone at the Universal Shaiva Fellowship?

Anyway - I stopped practicing that darkness technique. In Lakshmanjoo's exposition he mentions constant, pouring rain as an integral component of this technique, which is something that isn't given much emphasis in other translations. Also, I was starting to feel like I was living in a womb with heavy sheets over my windows blocking out all the light.

At the moment I have a full grasp over the Three Means - anavopaya, saktopaya, sambhavopaya - something which I have become aware of as being INTEGRAL to Kashmir Shaivism and the Vijnana Bhairava text. So I've played around with techniques from all three means. I'm going to relate a few experiences which come to mind:

1) a few miles from home, in the woods. Sitting cross-legged, although not in any particular external asana - just the cross-legged position I have been sitting in naturally since a child. Back leaning against a large tree. This was a few months ago so it was fairly cold - wore many layers. Where I was sitting was on a little hill overlooking a large field/swamp with trees at the other end. I got comfortable and locked my gaze on one of the distant trees. I did not blink or swerve my eyes. Totally fixed on that point, unmoving. This is Bhairavi Mudra - eyes fixed outwardly with the attention and intensity of awareness situated internally in subjective consciousness. After a few minutes a stiffening feeling came over the body and face, sort of like a rigormortis type of thing to a lesser extent. As I continued staring, mind stopped inasmuch as no thought or feeling occured. It is hard to explain but my consciousness was like a space or voidness. There was the image of the external world still present to the eyes but I did not feel a part of it, as if isolated from it and situated in a sort of emptiness. I think that if I held this dharana in this way successfully for more time significant "things" would happen. It seemed as if I was on the threshold, at the door waiting to go in, so to speak. As I left the area I was floating, in a way. My movement was entirely fluid, no stress on the body, just gliding. My mind was so quiet that I felt newly born and fresh. There was a buzz, like a bliss, throughout my whole body and mind. This was a technique in the Vijnana Bhairava.

2) Numerous short experiences of crossing, with awareness, from wakefulness to the dreaming state and close to the deep sleep state. Each time I got to the end of the dreaming state and was about to enter the deep sleep state I felt a strong pull, very much like water being drained down a hole. The sensation of this pull startled me and I would move back into the dreaming state, only with more lively awareness. I am not sure whether that pull would be the entry into Turya - sometimes it seemed as if the pull was that of unawareness - during the dreaming state my awareness would slowly start dimming and the pull seemed like a final warning - "This is it, total unawareness now..." and so I pulled back. Resulting from these sessions was the same feeling of an electric bliss permeating the body and mind. A very peaceful and amused state. Amused, as in, if someone came to me with a "problem" I would laugh at the absurdity of the idea that we experience "problems" in life. These experiences came from using the hamsah mantra - the first dharana.

3) more experiences with staring techniques. One from the other day comes to mind - was sitting with my dog outside on the lawn at sunset, the moment was perfect. Cool air on our skin, the last warmth of the evening sun, birds chirping, etc. I felt "this, right now, is Paradise". Then my mind became very still and deeply contemplative, I fixed my gaze and went inwards. At this point the moment I was experiencing went from ordinary and lovely to sacred and lovely. At first I was just experiencing the grass, the sunset, the birds, the air, and my companionship with the dog, but after fixing my gaze for several minutes a change occured in my consciousness as mind stilled. It was as if the moment was captured in a sort of jewel-like perfection, that I was aware of yet separate from. I felt entirely one with nature, as if I was the birds in the trees and the trees themselves, and the setting sun was more of this. It was beautiful. For hours after I could not be brought down - amused at everything, once again, and situated in deep peace when not involved in other things.

I am right on the threshold of really devoting myself to these practices to really go deep. I understand how my unconscious tendencies are directing my life, and that meditation is removing these impressions.

Anyone any thoughts on all this? Similar experiences?

sunyatisunya
17 April 2009, 02:45 AM
Hari Om


1. Vijnana Bhairava - The Practice of Centering Awareness - this is the notes and teachings of Svami Laksmanjoo given to his sisya Prabha Devi in 1991; Then turned into publication in 2002 [ISBN 81-86569-35-9]; I am a better person for finding this book.



yajvan, do you have the following: http://www.universalshaivafellowship.org/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=USFB&Product_Code=SS104&Category_Code=SS ?

In the introduction, John Hughes mentions that the book you mentioned is an incomplete and rushed (and stolen, I think - it seems someone got a hold of a manuscript Mr. Hughes was working on and published it early). Anyway, after reading through both books I've found it to be fairly true. The author of the book you mentioned cuts out a lot of the discussion between Lakshmanjoo and his disciples who asked fairly important questions regarding the practices or the translation of words. There's also bits of incorrect information littered throughout the book. If you have $125 I strongly suggest you get the seven disc audio set and manuscript. I have it if you have any questions about it.

yajvan
17 April 2009, 05:13 PM
hariḥ oṁ
~~~~~~

Namaste sunyatisunya


. If you have $125 I strongly suggest you get the seven disc audio set and manuscript. I have it if you have any questions about it.

I am saving $$ to purchase the 7 disc CD.

praṇām

sunyatisunya
17 April 2009, 05:24 PM
hariḥ oṁ
~~~~~~

Namaste sunyatisunya



I am saving $$ to purchase the 7 disc CD.

praṇām

I had to save for a while as well. Definitely one of my most rewarding purchases, considering the subject matter.

yajvan
03 September 2009, 04:20 PM
hariḥ oṁ
~~~~~~

Namast



Part of a triad of breathing i.e. pūraka (to take the breath inside), kumbhaka (to retain it), and recaka (to discharge it) - this is a pranayam technique [prāṇāyām प्राणायाम].

This kumbhaka - is that of a pot that holds or 'potting up' . In this method what it holds is the full breath as we breathe in -hold- then release or pūraka -> kumbhaka -> recaka. But it also holds nothing, emptiness, or shUnya from sarabhanga's post above.

So the whole process is pūraka -> kumbhaka -> recaka-> kumbhaka.
This pranayam pūraka (to take the breath inside), kumbhaka (to retain it), and recaka (to discharge it) and once discharged kumbhaka or shUnya of emptiness, vacancy of breath is done. So sometimes the pot [a.k.a your lungs] is full and sometimes the pot is empty.

The karika reads like this:
Kumbhita recita vapi purita va yada bhavet |
Tadante santranamasau saya shanta prakashate ||

Svāmī Lakṣman-jū's suggest the following:
When [the energy of breath or prana] is retained or kumbhita, either outside or inside [ that is the recaka or discharging of air, or pūraka , the intake of air] at the end [of this practice] the peaceful state is revealed by means of Shakti.

So the question is how long does one hold the breath on the inward stroke pūraka + kumbhaka and outward stoke recaka + kumbhaka? The answer is what is comfortableSwami Laksmanjoo says ' as long as one can do so easily'.

What then is brought to the aspirant?...shAnta or peace. He also says shAntanAma means SadAshiva. The state of SadAshiva is sAnta, absolutely peaceful and calm.
ॐनमःिशवाय

A visitor (to Mahaṛṣi 's āśram) asked how to realise oneself in accordance with Śrī Rāmana Mahaṛṣi's instructions...The difficulty was in controlling the mind.

Mahaṛṣi : It is to be done by controlling the breath. If you practise it by yourself without other help, then the mind is controlled. Otherwise the mind comes under control spontaneously in the presence of a superior power. Such is the greatness of association with the wise (satsanga).

from Talks with Śrī Rāmana Mahaṛṣi - These Talks covered a period of four years, 1935-1939.

yajvan
27 October 2009, 09:11 PM
hariḥ oṁ
~~~~~~

Namasté

It is said in the 130th kārikā of the Vijñāna Bhairava 'he who utters this word 'bhairava' unceasingly becomes śiva'.

This word as the collection of syllables (akṣara -syllable) must be of great import and value to understand, so let's take a look.

bhairava - lets disassemble - bha + i+ ra +va
bha भ is the aspirated form of ba ; with long a bhā means light or a beam of light , lustre , splendor.

i इ - is an interjection of anger that many associate with bhairava , yet it is also defined as and interjection of compassion. We must keep this in mind. See this HDF post for a more deeper discussion of this compassion: http://www.hindudharmaforums.com/showpost.php?p=17892&postcount=52 (http://www.hindudharmaforums.com/showpost.php?p=17892&postcount=52)

This 'i' is quite versatile and has many definitions, yet let me offer a few that will apply here- to spread out, to flow, to undertake anything, etc.
ra र is fire or heat; ra as a noun is brightness, splendor ; this ra as a bīja (seed) sound, bīja akṣara, is associated with the moon. The ra is found inside of other mantra-s themselves. It's heat, brightness and splendor associates itself with agni, the one that carries offerings/sounds to the devatā. This ra is also rooted( √ ) in rā which means acquiring , possessing.

va व is auspiciousness ( we find this in śiva); this va means strong, powerful - we know bhairava is known for this. In his name another way to view it is bhayā + rava + yati as it is called out in the 130 kārikā of the Vijñāna Bhairava¹ - bhayā ravayati. We can look at it this way: bhayā + rava +yati

bhayā = is rooted ( √) in bhī - fear , alarm dread apprehension
rava - to roar or howl. The strength 'va' comes in the energy of roaring. This rava also has a lighter side, as it also means singing or song. Yet we can see how 'va' and energy plays a role in both views of this word rava.
Note too that this 'va' is interchanged with the consonant 'ba'. So we can make the firm connection back to ba and the alignment again to light, luster and splendor.

Yet let's go one step deeper - this 'va' is a noun of varuṇa. And what does this word varuṇa mean? In its masculine gender it means 'all enveloping sky' - infinite. Another name ( hence a noun) of varuṇa is āditya.
Āditya means belonging to or coming from aditi. So if we know the definition of aditi we know āditya and another quality of varuṇa and hence the connection back to 'rava' in bhairava's name ( simple eh?).

This aditi is a most wonderful name made of a+diti. It means 'a' not + 'diti' splitting, dividing. So a+diti is one that is not split, not divided, hence wholeness, fullness, with no splits or divisions hence is pūrṇa - fullness; Some like to say (that would be me ) bhūman or abundance , plenty. Others would say samasta which is 'inherent in or pervading the whole of anything' - hence no division, or fraction.

yati यति is a giver; yati is 'a striver ', an ascetic , devotee , one who has restrained one's passions; a noun of śiva

Hence when assembled (piṇḍaya¹) this word bhairava carries piṇḍa¹, expressed at each level. Here is my humble POV on this word ; bhairava is He that :
bha - is light and splendor ( pure consciousness) + i which is full of compassion + ra and purifies via the heat (tapas) and splendor (ra) of agni + that brings auspiciousness va, and the expanse of the infinite (va varuṇa) i.e. fullness of Being, Divine Awareness of one's Infinite nature.

In my opinion it is only ignorance that shutters with fear (bhayā) at the sound of His name - for those with a pure heart, there is no fear; only auspiciousness (va) that is sung (rava) by the Great One, showering (i) those (yati) that are open to this fullness (aditi). Each of these qualities (IMHO) are stimulated, influenced by the sound of bhairava.

And what occurs? bhairavaṃ vapur-āpnuyāt (bhairavaṃ = bhairava + vapur= beautiful form, + āp = obtains + nu = surely + yā = attains or yāt = in as much ) - One surely attains bhairava's beautiful form i.e. one attains Divine Consciousness.

praṇām

words

piṇḍaya - rolled together; united, rolled into one.
piṇḍa - this is a single tone , of one phoneme or ~ 1 akṣara in length. Piṇḍa is also defined as 'power, force' , as well as 'tone, sound'. It is also defined as 'sum, total amount'. That is, a single sound, that carries within it the 'force' of 'the sum total amount'.

vinod
25 February 2010, 02:35 PM
hi


this is vinod good work boss .kindly post all 112 sutras or slokas of vijnana bairava tantra in english or sanskrit if possible. great work keep going my wishes are with you .i once again request you to send the slokas. thanks and bye
vinod

N.R.Ranganathan
31 May 2015, 12:12 AM
Respected sirs:

I would like the learned members to clarify my doubt. While meditating on SOHAM, it is said in one upanishad that inhale with SO and exhale with HUM. In some other upanishads it is said that inhale with HUM and exhale with SO. Which is correct or both are right . If so, what is the reason for it. Upanishads might be having some reason to say differently at differently places. Thanks and regards,
N.R.Ranganathan.