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yajvan
24 November 2007, 06:40 PM
Hari Om
~~~~~

Namaste,

Nijashuddhi is ones impurity. Why is it that we as human beings are considered Divine, yet we [ i ] see so many blemishes in our selves and the radiance of the Divine must be mined, like gold or diamonds?

Why is it that this SELF simply does not shine forth? This question is posed in the 9th karika of the Spandakarika¹.

This is considered an important agama. If you study the Siva Sutras, then this book is a complementary adjunct to that knowledge. The 3 Awakenings of the Siva Sutras are posted on HDF for your consideration: http://www.hindudharmaforums.com/showthread.php?t=2078 (http://www.hindudharmaforums.com/showthread.php?t=2078)

Nijashuddhi - ones own impurity is how the 9th karika starts off. This asuddhi is impurity , yet what is meant is mala. Mala मल is considered dirt , filth , dust , yet we are directed to consider mala as a limiting condition. Just as one has dirt and dust on the windshield of a car, it can be wiped off. The muni says there are 3 kinds of significant malas.

Anava mala
Mayiya mala
Karma malaI thought to comment on the first one (other malas if there is interest).
This anava mala is intriguing to me. This limitation pertains to aNu अणु or fine , minute , atomic. It points to the individual jiva.

Think of it. The Infinite now thinks it is contained in a body with length, width, height and is constrained to a boundary. The boundless constrained to a boundary!

This limitation sets the stage for the other two mala. Think of yourself. You get to go where you wish, make selections about your life, go here and there on vacations. Then all of a sudden you are confined to a room (~ like a jail) that is just 3 meters by 3 meters and 4 meters in height. What would be your experience? That of limitation, of the 'blemish' of constraint. What would you want to do?

Get out is the order of the day , yes? Perhaps our desires then is the Supreme's way of knocking at the door to say it is time to get out. Time to return to the Infinite Nature of the SELF that is home, that is, My Natural State.

It has been said, all desires in the final analysis is the desire for the Infinite; to experience something more then the most, that will satisfy the mind. That is why no-one desire tends to crunch ones thirst for any period of time… the wise say finite things do not contain happiness². So we continue to look for that experience that is full in itself and will make one stop looking.

It starts with the constraint of the infinite, the anava mala. Once we know this then, it allows us to move forward. It allows us to say, these desires are really natural and some [ sadhus, mumuksha, yogis and yoginis] have directed them to the pursuit of samvit [Supreme Consciousness].

We have begun to break the code! A crack in the mala मल, and the light, prakash [ pra = 'forth' + kAsh 'to shine ] starts streaming though.



1. This Spandakarika has multiple commentaries, Yet I am reading the one by Ksemaraja. The author ( composer) is Vasugupta-ji . Some may take issue and say Kallata was the author of the Spandakarika… I will leave that to the experts other then myself.

2. Nalpe sukham asti - 'finite things do not contain happiness' - rishi Sanatkumara, Chandogya Upanishad [ I think!]


ॐनमःिशवाय

pranams

yajvan
09 December 2007, 02:47 PM
Hari Om
~~~~~



Nijashuddhi - ones own impurity is how the 9th karika starts off. This asuddhi is impurity , yet what is meant is mala. Mala मल is considered dirt , filth , dust , yet we are directed to consider mala as a limiting condition. Just as one has dirt and dust on the windshield of a car, it can be wiped off.

Namaste,

the last verse or karika 9 dealt with the impurities we as humans encounter. Now we go to karika 10 and a question is asked...

What happens when the limited, empirical individual is dissolved? (That is ignorance is dissolved)What is left in the person is the Supreme. If this Supreme is infinte perfect silence, the perfect Absolute, what happens to the person? Does s/he become like the wave-less ocean? Where before the native is the wave ( activity within the relative field of life) now he/she is at the Universal status, is s/he now devoid of activity?

This is a most excellent and profound question. We know the Absolute to be perfect, transcendent, some say perfect Silence, perfect Being. If this is the status of the individual does s/he then too become just stillness, complete, but with no action?

The 10th karika informs us of the following:

Tadāsyākrtrimo dharmo jnatvakartrtvalaksanah|
yatas tadepsitam sarvam jānati ca karoti ca ||

Then will flash forth his innate nature characterized by cognition and activity, by which he ( the native) then knows and does all that is desired ( by the native).

This insight is far reaching and answers some questions many have of the status and actions of the sadhu. It says then at the time of entrance into that Supreme state, all the native desired to know or do at the time of the entering the Supreme is now afforded to him/her.

I find this a very unique state of affairs... what does the native desire most at that time? Swami Laksmanjoo reviews some of these conditions as how kundalini manifests or reveals itself fully in the native.


If there is interest we can review...

ॐनमःिशवाय

pranams

yajvan
19 January 2008, 04:33 PM
Hari Om
~~~~~

Namaste,

In another post we were discussing the knots one finds along the path to moksha http://www.hindudharmaforums.com/showpost.php?p=19936&postcount=28 (http://www.hindudharmaforums.com/showpost.php?p=19936&postcount=28)

I wrote, the knot in the heart, this hṛdayagranthi, is broken by the perception of the Supreme, tasmin dṛṣhṭe parātpare.

Rajalakshmi offered the definition of the 3 knots
The three knots are the knot of ignorance, knot of passion and knot of karma.

These knots are considered granthi (ग्रन्थि) - a knot , tie , knot of a cord , knot tied in the end of a garment for keeping money; it is also the joint of a reed or cane; joint of the body.

I also wrote, these gaps can also be considered the consciousness-counterpart of saṁdhyā (junction , juncture) we talk about between day and night ( twilight) and night and day (dawn).These junction points, the gaps, granthi are seen in the AM, mid-day, PM and even one at mid-night.
They can be considered gaps, like a joint, the conjoining point or junction. Like that, the gap between one state of consciounsess and other as in wake-dream-sleep states, one may find turiya there.


So the above sets the audit trail to offer karika 17 from the Spandakarikas¹, as I thought it was most germane to the conversation:

Tasyopalabhiḥ satataṃ tripadāvyabhicāriṇī |
nityaṃ syāt suprabuddhasya tadādyante parasya tu ||

The fully enlightened has always and incessantly the undeviating knowledge of the SELF in all 3 states;
The other one has it only at the begining and ending of each state.

That is, the fully-awakened has the upalabdhi or obtainment , acquisition , gain with the SELF at all times, during wake-dream and sleep, without fail.

Yet 'the other one' has it that the beginning and ending of each state.
Who is this 'other one'? The sadhu who is not fully realized Being, the SELF. He/she finds it at the saṁdhyā, the gaps, at the granthi of the 3 states of consciousness wake-dream-sleep.

So glimpses of this turya can be had, at these junctions, yet one needs to know first, that this is there. To the one in avidya, these junctions pass by with out notice.

I liken these gaps to one waking down a dark hall way with doors on each side. As one looks to a door the light seaps out from around the door, at the junctions of the door frame and the hall way. Like that, this turya seeps out (as a metaphor) at the granthi, gaps, saṁdhyā of wake-dream-sleep.

pranams

1. Spanda-karikas - The Divine Pulsation - translated to english by Jaideva Singh. These karikas are to work hand-and-hand with the siva sutras. The original composition is attributed to Vasugupta muni. It is interesting to note just as the siva sutras has 3 sections , so too the spanda karikas follow suit with 3 nihsyandas also.

MahaHrada
20 January 2008, 07:43 PM
Namaste Yajvan,

It is maybe worth mentioning that it is possible to give a much more literal interpretation to the 3 granthis, as being literally existing constrictions, knots blocking the flow of the prana, these granthis are being caused by the natural twining of ida and pingala nadi around the sushummna occuring at certain places.
As long as these constrictions are present neither the pranashakti nor the hamsapurusha nor the urdvha shakti can move by their or one´s own Volition.

Indeed "we" are not even aware of ourselves, not aware of these triple forces and of the form we ourselve assume in our own body (as kundalini etc)

Being unable to move because of the constrictions, we remain bound individuals unless we clean away the impurities in the nadis, pierce the granthis, and remove the stale pranas by the practice of Yoga and become able to move in inner space (Khecara)
Please note there is indeed nothing symbolic there is nothing philosophical implied, i am talking about a movement that exist as real as your own breath or heartbeat only on a sukshma level.

This vital force as well as mind and volition are not intellectual concepts only, but these aspects of the self exist in a more distinct literal way then most would suspect and are located in the upper middle and lower parts of the body and their energies are concentrated in the central channel (sushumna) in the three locations parted by the granthis.

Much content can be interpreted in a more literal way than often done i belive sometimes this emphasis on mental concepts and symbolic interpretations is done deliberately by some of teachers, to hide some practical aspects that are considered dangerous or unhealthy for the common person to even know about.

In my opinion not only acquiring premature knowledge about practical literal yoga applications has its dangers but also this bias towards intellectual symbolic knowledge and silence about the literal and practical yoga, has some unhealthy aspects. It can lead one far away from the actual meaning of the content of the shastras. As Guru Gorakhnath said:

"One day the cat will come and eat the parrot."

Pranams
Mahahradanatha

yajvan
20 January 2008, 08:00 PM
Hari Om
~~~~~

Namaste Yajvan,

Much content can be interpreted in a more literal way than often done i believe sometimes this emphasis on mental concepts and symbolic interpretations is done deliberately by some of teachers, to hide some practical aspects that are considered dangerous or unhealthy for the common person to even know about.

In my opinion not only acquiring premature knowledge about practical literal yoga applications has its dangers but also this bias towards intellectual symbolic knowledge and silence about the literal and practical yoga, has some unhealthy aspects. It can lead one far away from the actual meaning of the content of the shastras. As Guru Gorakhnath said:
Pranams


Namaste Mahahradanatha,
a very favorable post... please add more. Yes I am aware of the knots that are resident in many. For convenience, some just call this stress. But you are correct, we can be very specific here.

Please feel free to lead the way on this matter... I am encouraged to read your next post on this.

pranams,

MahaHrada
21 January 2008, 02:49 PM
Namaste Yajvan,

Well what should i add? This is a huge topic with many ramifications. The jiva when it moves into a body seems to get intermingled with the same and he mounts the prana so that what affects the body affects the mind affects the prana affects the state of the jiva.

That way the three states ,waking, dream ,and deep sleep are not only mental states but located in the body. If the granthis parting these states are loosened or pierced one can assume the states by volition, retaining awareness.

Maybe it is relevant to add that i consider these states to be always present at the same time, in waking state there are parts of oneself that are dreaming and other parts of the self that are even in deep sleep (regulating automatic body functions)
This is true for the other states also, for instance in the dream state there are parts of consciousness that are awake-aware of the dream happening.

According to the preponderance of a state consciousness shifts location in the central nadi.

By piercing or loosening the granthis upward movement of prana inside the sushummna can begin which will also mean that the three states intermingle which will result in becoming aware of the fact that the three states are always occuring at the same time.

No mental functions implied or used here, knowledge and spiritual upliftment of the jiva occurs only by volition, nadishuddhi and movement of prana and its impact on the state of the jiva.

In this case a lot of what is mentionend in the shastras pertaining to prana and apana etc. is not only physical inhalation or exhalation but oszillation of prana in the central channel, the location of the dvadashanta in this case is not the physical air located in 12 measures distance from the nose but it is the subtle prana situated 12 measures above the head where bhairava is located and realised after the skull is pierced open and the jiva is located there.
The idea that Bhairava can be realised by becoming aware of the physical breath leaves out an important part of the process which is, that by becoming aware of the physical breath one becomes aware that the important oscillation is in the central channel between the state of bhairava and the state of shakti in muladhara (the oszillation between the hridaya and the outer dvadashanta that is often emphasized by authorities on "kashmir shaivaism" is just a step that maybe can lead to the inner experience of the flow of subtle prana in the body)

Pranams
Mahahrdanatha

soham3
23 January 2008, 04:28 AM
I have come to realize that things or beings are subjective mental projections. If I see a man as a devil, there must be evil inside me.

MahaHrada
23 January 2008, 08:34 AM
Namaste Yajvan
Namaste Soham

Let me elaborate on my last post by adding a comment to the lines of the Vijnana Bhairava that you commented on in this thread:

http://hindudharmaforums.com/showthread.php?t=2323

24 Shri devi uvAca
Devadeva trishulAnka kapAlakrtabhushana..

Which you translated as:

"Sri Devi asks Shiva [Bhairava],
O God Of gods ( some like to write Lord of Lords as the text reads deva-deva), whose emblem is the trident (trisulanka)..."

It seems that on his way to Hindudharmaforums Lord Bhairava lost one of the emblems :) the skullbowl he carried, i will take the liberty and reinvest him with this important emblem.

This sloka will then translate as.... carrying the trishula and the skull(bowl)(kapAla)

Now this karika is about the realisation of Paradevi in unison with Bhairava.

I will explain where this union will take place and what the emblem of trishula and skullbowl have to do with the yoga of the subtle pranas.

This state aimend at is called in this verse : "digdeshakAlasunya" that means it is a state free from time space and direction.

It is further said said that Paradevi is the mouth i.e. door or entrance to that experience or state of mind, "kair upayair mukham tasya parA devi katham bhavet."

As i have mentioned in my last posting, the states of consciousness are located in ones own (subtle) body in the chakra system and the granthis divide them.

We are taught in these slokas how to penetrate these divison in our own body with the help of the devis and devas that reside in our own body.

Becoming acquainted with the devas in our own body allows us to participate in the universal experience also. That is possible because of the non-difference between the pinda and brahmanda which is postulated in the tantras and in the tradition of the mahAsiddhas.

The devi located in the body is superior middling and low according to where she is situated and is given different names according to sampradaya. In nath parAmpara it is urdhva, madhya, adhah shakti in trika kaula sampradaya (part of what is commonly called "kashmir shaivaism" by most scholars) this devi is known to manifest as: para parApara and apara devi.

Now , in these slokas it is said that the text is concerned with the knowledge of para devi, she is situated in the uppermost part of the body and thus provides the subtle entrance (mukham) to states beyond the body.

And so we can project conciousness with the help of the instructions in these slokas, beyond time space and other limitations the jiva is normally subjected to when embodied, and thus imprisoned by the cage and network (jala) of nadis and granthis.

The most important instruments and the object of this method of liberation from the network are already mentioned in the first slokas introducing us into the subject bythe question of devi to bhairava (slokas 22-23) but upto now the object of this instrument, was unavailable to HDF due to its droppage on the way here (the skull).

Luckily and to the dismal of the orthodox- Bhairava now comes here, carrying this ugly cup, chopped of brahmas head. :)

The trishula in this context, might be considered,as a symbol of the central channel with the main nadis ida and pingala, carrying the sun and moon pranas, inside them. They are located at both sides of the central channel.

This meeting of the 3 nadis symbolised by the trishula, occurs at each of the granthis, the rudra granthi in the brain is of main importance here, because this karika refers to the passage of paradevi.

When the rudra granthi in the brain region, is pierced by prana, the doorway of paradevi (mukham), at the top of the skull, can be made to open up.

So what has to be applied in Yoga is the force of Bhairavas trishula: the sun and moon prana and the prana in the central channel these are used to pierce through the granthis and open the pathway , and the object to which it is applied is ones own skull, which is pierced to reach the upper region, the inner dvadashanta, above the head region , beyond the satchakras, where the supreme state is located (digdeshakalasunya) , the state beyond fourth state.

next sloka says:
urdhve prAno hy adho jivo visargAtma paroccaret
utpattidvitayastAhne bharanAd bharita sthitih

Usually this karika in modern kashmir shaivaism is apparently not translated literally, and "adho jivo" (lower jiva) is interpreted as meaning physical inbreath and urdhve prAno (upper lifeforce) to mean physical outgoing breath, and subsequently the reader is made to assume that by watching the ending points of his physical breath he can achieve the supreme feat of realising Bhairavi and Bhairava in union.

In our little journey into the world of the yoga of the subtle body, we do not need to exercise our mind too much and can translate "adho jivo" literally , that is as "the Jiva located at the lower region" of the body and "urdhve prano", as the prana located in the upper region (of the body).

Now the karika 24 is not an instruction to become aware of the physical breath anymore , but of the subtle breath.
The gradual process is to become aware of the Prana of the uper region above the rudra granthi (place of the upper
subtle male lunar bindu of the visarga) and to unite with, or become aware of the polar force, the jiva located at the distant end of the central channel, below the brahma granthi.

Here the jiva has the the form of the kundalini shakti, represented by the lower, the female solar bindu of the visarga here she is called the "adho jivo", the self that is situated in the lower region.

So it is said in the sloka if we keep our attention fixed on these two points (the visarga : "visargAtma paroccaret") or polarities in the meru danda, the central channel, we can cause the state of Union of Bhairavi and Bhairava to emerge.

This is a very complicated and dangerous process since loosening of the granthis can result in the death of the physical body, maybe that is the reason why it is has become hidden behind awkward translations and deluding commentaries.

But i have no fear here and belive that it should be made known that never can a jiva attain to the state of shiva just by watching the physical breath That such practices are useful for some other end, or for preparing the sadhak to become mindful of the inner breath is another question.

Prerequsite for appreciating tantric shastras is that, by descent of the urdhva shakti, through anugraha of Guru, Devi or Shiva and the subsequent initial piercing or loosening of the granthis insight spontaneously occurs out of ones own self, (sahaja) not by mental reflection.

In this path of the siddhas, unlike other paths, experience should come earlier - intellectual reflections later.

Without shuddhi of the physical and subtle organism,also the capability of intellectual understanding is sadly limited, therefore a theoretical study of kaula shastras without anugraha and nadi shuddhi can be very frustrating at times.

If there is interest, please comment, i will then give some more explanations on these lines on the next karikas because they describe details of the process in a more elaborate way.

pranams

Mahahradanatha

"madhya sakti prabodhena
adhah shakti nikuncanAt
Urdhva shakti nipAtena prApyate paramam padam."

"Awakening of the Madhyashakti
contraction of the Adhashakti
and descent of the urdhvashakti
lead to the supreme goal."

Siddha siddhanta Paddhati
Gorakhnatha

yajvan
25 April 2008, 11:40 PM
Hari Om
~~~~~~


If there is interest, please comment, i will then give some more explanations on these lines on the next karikas because they describe details of the process in a more elaborate way.

pranams

Mahahradanatha

"madhya sakti prabodhena
adhah shakti nikuncanAt
Urdhva shakti nipAtena prApyate paramam padam."

"Awakening of the Madhyashakti
contraction of the Adhashakti
and descent of the urdhvashakti
lead to the supreme goal."

Siddha siddhanta Paddhati
Gorakhnatha

Namaste MahaHrada
I am in hopes you are still reading these posts?

Perhaps if you have an opinion on dvAdaSAnta, and its proper location, as this fits into visarga quite nicely, this too will help in the conversation.

pranams

MahaHrada
27 April 2008, 08:01 AM
Namaste Yajvan,

I think there are several types of dvAdAshanta, one must judge according to the context, whether one specific, or maybe even several interpretations at once are feasible.

We do have some clues from within what sampradaya the Vijnanabhairava originally arose, it must have been close to the siddhas, yogis and maybe natha parampara, but one cannot know for shure, apparently its original Siddha propounders shared some views with the later kashmiri authors that you where citing, who commented on this text, but occasionally there is some ambiguity, and also differences in approach that even affect the current translations available..

Generally it can be said regarding dvadashanta there are at least 4 important locations mentionend that can all be called correct.

Regarding the mundane breath we have the dvAdAshanta located 12 finger breadth (3 hands length without the thumbs) outside the body,measuring is started from the tip of the nose, that dvadashanta is the point of the average elongation of a normal outbreath, this location is the bahya dvAdAshanta)

Then the same distance in downward movement, the inbreath, is measured downward to a location of 3 Hands width distance, this is the location of the inner dvadashanta, the distance the average mundane inbreath is traveling into the body. (antara dvadashanta)

Then we have the internal dvadashanta that is marking the distance the internal/subtle prana/ breath in the susummna nadi is able travel in the case of a person who has achieved the state of atmavyapti, which is measured with three hands starting from the bhrumadhya between the eyebrows, measured upwards on the skull, ending at the midpoint of the skull, this place is the urdhva dvadasanta it is also called brahmarandhra or tenth door/opening since it is like the other nine openings of the body also an opening, where prana can exit the body.

This is also the place of location of the ParAkasha. (one of the 5 Vyomas or voids)

"Above the forehead there is a place called DvAdashAnta,
where the top of the skull ends and two fingers beyond the head, there
is what is called the supreme ether (ParAkasha)"
Svacchandasamgraha

The next dvadashanta is the sahasrara chakra located twelve finger breadth distance above the brahmarandhra, this is the distance breath or prana can travel upward in the case of a person who has achievd shivavyapti.

This dvAdAshanta exists beyond another set of a measure of 12 , these 12 are the 6 chakras (from muladhara to ajna) the 3 granthis (Brahma Vishnu and Rudragranthi) and the 3 mandalas of the three sources of light (agni=fire surya= sun and soma= moon) 6+3+3 = 12 subtle body measures.

The dvAdAshanta measured from the Bhrumadhya is an important Location for the practice of Nadavedha the piercing by inner unstruck sound, since there are very subtle 9 stages of inner sound that reverberate from the Ajna upwards and this Nada forms a vibrant flame like twirl passing out and beyond the skull aperture moving on its way upward through nine subtle chakras.

(Reference to a "stringed instrument" in the context of this interpretation equals the string of the subtle vajra nadi inside the susummna. the sound of this instrument is the unstruck sound of kundalini as vak devi/matrika shakti, to which the yogi can listen when the senses turn inward and Kundalini/Prana straightens/ erects from the crooked form of mundane breath to the upright prana flowing into the median way of the susummna)

Once the nada and the prana push from bhrumadhya up through the skull the consciouness moves from atmavyapti to shivavyapti i.e from one dvadashanta to the next. This is also called a flame, because it is wavelike in character.

In this practice the Kundalini awakens in the bhrumadhya and goes right up to the final resting place the highest dvadashanta. This path of the shambhava siddhas is a movement of one time twelve finger breadth distance in the body and another twelve measures distance out of the body. (a flame like protrusion of Bindu-nada above the head)

But without deha shuddhi, bhuta shuddi, and chitta shuddhi the jiva/prana of the mundane person that has not transcend the individual self, will only move in a crooked or curled mundane way, oscllating two ways one between ida and pingala nadi, (sun and moon) and also the mind will be following the breath movement of outward and inward breath and that way osciallating between the mundane antara and bahya dvadashanta.

These Polarities are symbolised by the visarga where one bindu has the nature of the sun and the other of the moon, the polarities exist in the body in both horizontal and vertical axis and when in equilbrium (sama) it will effect the smooth transition from mundane breath to internal breath/prana.

Untieying and loosen the granthis cleaning and widening and making the nadis flexible would be the preliminary steps towards applying some of the techniques that serve to align the movement of the subtle prana and bindu with the mundane breath.

It is said that to cause the curled up or crooked kundalini to become erect one has to assume a straight posture with a mind that is stilled and breath that is even.

Mundane breath and mind has to become stilled and even and prana must not allowed to move out through the nine mundane openings, this is achieved by turning the mind inward in samadhi, than breath/prana will turn erect by its own in an effortless way, it is said and eject by the tenth openingwithout force.

Too much and too early application of force on the prana by bandhas and kriyas and mind activity on its own, without deha, nadi, chitta shuddhi may be detrimental to progress and health, so practice may not be advisable, but nonetheless i consider it important to know that there exist several subtle levels of interpretation of texts like the Vijnana Bhairava and one should not be satisfied intellectually with one singular approach.

pranams

MahaHrada

yajvan
27 April 2008, 05:34 PM
Hari Om
~~~~~

Namaste MahaHrada,

Your post is very insightful.
Let me ask a few questions - not all at once, as they deserve reflection time..



"Above the forehead there is a place called DvAdashAnta,
where the top of the skull ends and two fingers beyond the head, there
is what is called the supreme ether (ParAkasha)" Svacchandasamgraha


This is the one I was thinking. As one measures 12 fingers from ajna chakra up 12 fingers is above the head. Yet this position is further then just two fingers above the head. I must assume these are one and the same locations?

And from that location can one conceive of prana coming from there?
or from ajna? or from the heart area ? All considered important locations.

Your assessment is welcomed.

pranams

MahaHrada
28 April 2008, 10:21 AM
Hari Om
~~~~~

Namaste Yajvan

This is the one I was thinking. As one measures 12 fingers from ajna chakra up 12 fingers is above the head.


One does not measure upwards , but measure on the body and thus follow the shape of the head to reach the first dvAdAshanta, put the hands first on the brow, than on the forehead and the third reaches the top of the head, that way you exactly reach in 12 finger measures from in between the eyebrows to the middle of the skull.
Next part talks of the ParAkasha that begins two fingerbreadth above the first dvadashanta.

There are diverse minor differences between the shastras and also the Sampradayas regarding details of the subtle body.

One of the differences is the distance between the dvadashanta and sahasrara (second dvadashanta).

Since the Sahasrara is considered the seat of Parakasha or Mahasunya whatever the supreme void is called, the second part referring to the seat of parakasha might possibly refer to Sahasrara considered in this case to be only 2 fingerbreadth distance from the first dwadashanta.

In the kashmiri sampradayas krama, trika, and others the main chakras are 5 plus sahasrara and these chakras are all thought to be located 3 fist distance from each other.

Others agree that Sahasrara is hovering closer to the dvadashanta and then of course usually do not name it dvadashanta.

I prefer to consider dvadashanta as a junction point or doorway between the individual body and the cosmic body, it leads one out of the individual state (represented by the 5 bodily chakras from muladhara to ajna) into the cosmic transpersonal state (the sahasrara.)

Beyond Ajna there are no nadis so consciousness has to leap through a gap, this gap is dvadashanta.

The nature of being a junction point is shared by the mundane breath dvadashanta here marks the junction from inbreath to outbreath.

Prana can, provided the yogi has the required stage of achievement, theoretically move up from all the points you mention plus muladhara and/or nabhi , this will give rise to different experiences.

If you mean by your question where or if there is a point or several, of origin of prana this is a more difficult question because we have to first distinguish between varieties of prana like male female prenatal and postnatal prana, and also consider the role of bindu/rajas.

Generally one can say that the postnatal prana is replenished by intake of 3 kinds of "food" 1.) sense impressions 2.) breathing and 3.) eating

Than there is inherited prenatal life force from our father and mother, which in the normal life will not be replenished and if used up causes the body to wither. This prenatal prana can only be replenished by yoga.

There are several locations where these differnt body energies originate from or prominently assemble.

Pranams

MahaHrada

yajvan
28 April 2008, 11:25 AM
Hari Om
~~~~~

One does not measure upwards , but measure on the body and thus follow the shape of the head to reach the first dvAdAshanta, put the hands first on the brow than forehead and third is top of head head, that way you exactly reach in 12 finger measures from between the eyebrows to the middle of the skull.


Namaste Maharada,

Yes, very helpful; follownig the contour of the head makes sense... thank you.

I will assume this method then applies to other locatons of the body. Following its contour. Please correct me if I am wrong.

Now may I ask another and get your clarification:

Lets say I breathe in through the nose, the prana comes in and moved downward ( apana); it reaches its completion, a dwell, a 'balance' point - the place where the exhale is born; The one exhales and , and finishes at its completion point , the place where the inhaled breath is born.

So here is my questions:

Where does that inhale breath begin? how far out of the body ( 12 fingers again?) and in which direction? And when the inhale stops is this the heart area? ( not physical heart but the suble area of feelings, some like to call it the center madhya).
With those answers, the 3rd question to tie this together:
Are these two locations visarga as outlined in kArikA 24 of the Vijnana Bhairava agama?My understanding¹ as a reference point
karika 24
The exhaling breath (prana) should ascend and the inhaling breath should decend, both forming visarga [consisting of 2 points]. Their state of fullness (is Found) by fixing then the two paces of their origin.

What is their two places of origin? The heart area. When one says the heart they do not mean the physical heart. It is the space in the chest area. Its called the space between the arm pits as its called, to give one a location. Another definition is 12 fingered spaces between the eyebrows to the heart area. So , the center of the breast area.
This visarga विसर्ग is sending forth , letting go , liberation , emission , discharge, hurling , throwing , shooting , casting. With the outward breath there is 'sa' and inword breath there is 'ha'. Many know this as hamsa mantra ( or swan) and this becomes so'ham over time , when repeated.

pranams



1. From Vijnana Bhairava - The Practice of Centering Awareness - this is the notes and teachings of Laksmanoo given to his sisya Prabha Devi in 1991; Then turned into publication in 2002 [ISBN 81-86569-35-9]

MahaHrada
29 April 2008, 12:16 PM
So here is my questions:
Where does that inhale breath begin? how far out of the body ( 12 fingers again?) and in which direction? And when the inhale stops is this the heart area? ( not physical heart but the suble area of feelings, some like to call it the center madhya).

Inhaling breath of the average person measures 8 Finger breadth (2 Fist) from the nose outside in space, The wasted 4 counts difference from the outbreath are considered to be one of the causes for the process of aging.

The recommendation is to equal the length of the outgoing with that of the inhaling breath to prolong life.

This is done by slowing down the outbreath to a distance of 2 fist length, so that both inhaling and exhaling breath only have 2 fist length.

Which is one meaning of the "samana" breath.



With those answers, the 3rd question to tie this together:
Are these two locations visarga as outlined in kArikA 24 of the Vijnana Bhairava agama?

Yes but not solely, as i wrote before, the meaning has to be extended to the inner breath, the lifeforce flowing in the nadis to fulfill the final promise of the karikas, the union with Bhairava consciousness.

The first step would be to become aware of the ending points and in the later karika, of the void,at the time when the mundane breath is not oscilating, but is still.

In the commentary it is not revealed that the reason for remembering the void is that we establish consciousness in the median channel and that this process should straighten the breath from the curled flow of mundane breath/pranashakti/kundalini, outside the body to awareness of the flow of life force in the median channel.

When that happens the points of the visarga are located in the brahmarandhra and muladhara, instead of outside the body in dwadashanta, and in the hridaya chakra.

If our consicousness is established inside the median void, we can proceed to untangle the twists of the translation offered to us and it will make sense in its literal translation also.





My understanding¹ as a reference point
karika 24
The exhaling breath (prana) should ascend and the inhaling breath should decend, both forming visarga [consisting of 2 points]. Their state of fullness (is Found) by fixing then the two paces of their origin.

What is their two places of origin? The heart area.



Not really, only one point is in that area, in the interpretation Swami Lakshman joo is suggesting we have two places of origin- one is the location of the end of the mundane outbreath, the outer dvadashanta, and one is the end of the inbreath, the inner dvadashanta in the hridaya chakra, one is the shiva bindu of the two bindus of the visarga (the knowledge) and the other place of origin in the outer dvadashanta is the shakti bindu of the visarga (the known).

And we should be aware of both balance points at the same time. and in a following karika of the void at these points.

When the outer breath does not move (Kumbhakam) the median way is open.

In the mundane breath shiva shakti is not balanced, body and mind swing from one state to the other, the presence of the phase "void of movement" is only acessible at a short time at both polar ends of the breaths. (the two bindus of the visarga)

Concentration on these points of the mundane breath should transport your consciousness and the prana should be incited to move into the median channel. When this happens the two points of the visarga are not recollected any more at the end of mundane breath but at the begining and end end of the median channel.



This visarga विसर्ग is sending forth , letting go , liberation , emission , discharge, hurling , throwing , shooting , casting.


Visarga means the creative emission of the universe/consciousness.

Here we are concerned with the basic triplicity of Kaula, consisting of the Supreme Bindu also called baindava, where shiva shakti is found in complete union (samarasya) which is the primal source of the universe and consciousness, and the visarga which consist of two polar bindus of shiva shakti split apart.

Together they are forming a trikona. The ultimate is that which encompasses all this and by the fact it encompasses the parts transcends.

This creation process which is continually happening, consist of a process in which this bindu is splitting into visarga through the impact of nada/spanda which is the resulting motion caused by the will of Shiva/Shakti to create.

When this bindu splits all the chakras and kundalini come into existence in an singular instance born from the trikona that is formend by the primal bindu and the visarga.

Spanda nada vak and prana are all related or synonymous to Kundalini.

This trikona is the knower, knowledge, known, soma, surya, agni, waking, dream, deep sleep, ajna, hridaya, muladhara, sristhi, stithi, samhara etc.

The question for the consciousness is how do we become aware of the underlying unity, of the primal phenomena, the samarasya of shiva shakti?

I suspect that karikas from 22 until 32 describe steps of one process related to Kundalini, there is more to be found than several disconnected dharanas.

This Kriya or dharana seems to be a method to unify individual consciousness with that primal unity of shiva shakti in the mahabindu by means of Pranayama and by focussing attention on the urdhva and the adhah kundalini resulting in unity of consciousness with the primal bindu in singular stillness of both prana and apana, a state called bindukala, in the heart of Shiva.

Pranams

MahaHrada

yajvan
29 April 2008, 07:13 PM
Hari Om
~~~~~

Inhaling breath of the average person measures 8 Finger breadth (2 Fist) from the nose outside in space, The wasted 4 counts difference from the outbreath are considered to be one of the causes for the process of aging.


Which is one meaning of the "samana" breath.

The first step would be to become aware of the ending points and in the later karika, of the void,at the time when the mundane breath is not oscilating, but is still.

In the commentary it is not revealed that the reason for remembering the void is that we establish consciousness in the median channel and that this process should straighten the breath from the curled flow of mundane breath/pranashakti/kundalini, outside the body to awareness of the flow of life force in the median channel.

When that happens the points of the visarga are located in the brahmarandhra and muladhara, instead of outside the body in dwadashanta, and in the hridaya chakra.

If our consicousness is established inside the median void, we can proceed This Kriya or dharana seems to be a method to unify individual consciousness with that primal unity of shiva shakti in the mahabindu by means of Pranayama and by focussing attention on the urdhva and the adhah kundalini resulting in unity of consciousness with the primal bindu in singular stillness of both prana and apana, a state called bindukala, in the heart of Shiva.



Namaste MahaHrada
thank you for taking the time to post this... what you write does not seem foreign to my understanding ( and practice), this is a good thing.

Yet for some time I have been using the heart area and ajna points as visarga and find it works well... I not will try outside the body (via the nose location) as one starting point.

I also can see the value of the being mindful of both points at the same time. As the kArikAs continue with additional institutions - kArikA informs the saidu to focus ( be mindful, uninterrupted awareness) of the two end points and points and consider the void.

As one reads the offering from Bhairava, one can see the groupings and the progression of the teaching.

thank you again. I hopethis may inspire others to consider reading Vijnana Bhairava.

pranams

MahaHrada
30 April 2008, 04:38 AM
Namaste Yajvan,
There are various locations of visarga or visarga and bindu (trikona) in the subtle body or chakra system. Spontaneously from memory i know at least six different locations that are used in dharanas, not counting those outside the body.

There is one thing concerning the different locations of the Visarga, it is important if not vital for the practice to take into account, or realise, that the two bindus , of the Visarga symbol always represent primal dualities and are therefore only to be found in locations that are because of their nature part of a pair of opposittes.

In the case of the hridaya chakra considered as inner dvadashanta it is the location of the jiva, the inspired breath his knowledge, the dual point of this location is consequently the phenomenal world, what is termend "the known", becoming aware of the unity of the knowledge the inspired breath, with the known, the expired breath, one causes the arising of the fusion point the supreme bindu, the authentic knower (transpersonal self/shiva)

This knowledge of the sameness of the known and knowledge happens naturally when the breath is not moving, that is on the junction point of his two modes, because it is unmoving both times, no matter whether inbetween an in and outbreath or inbetween an out and inbreath.

In the inner breath the prana flow, the polarities are shakti bindu in muladhara and shiva bindu in dvadashanta. In this case their union, the appearance of the knower, happens in hridaya chakra, that is why, the third, the undivided mixed bindu , also shown as satkona, is located in hridaya, (this bindu is not not the shiva part of the two visarga bindus as it was in the case of the dharana on outer breath, but the mahabindu the apex of the triangle, the source of the two visarga bindus.

Visarga is eiter operating in the mode sristhi samhara or samghatta
where shakti bindu is sristhi shiva bindu samhara and their union samghatta.

In samhara state the shakti is quiet or peaceful (shanta) since shiva principle dominates, when shakti principle dominates there is agitation (udgita) Only when both are balanced (sama) there is union and the knower will appear.

Pranams

Mahahrada

yajvan
30 April 2008, 01:37 PM
Namaste Yajvan,

There is one thing concerning the different locations of the Visarga, it is important if not vital for the practice to take into account, or realise, that the two bindus , of the Visarga symbol always represent primal dualities and are therefore only to be found in locations that are because of their nature part of a pair of opposittes.

In the case of the hridaya chakra considered as inner dvadashanta it is

Namaste Mahahrada,
I see your point. Dualities, Sun and Moon; Night and day. It is the gap, sandhyā , where the treasure lies. As in amātrā, were the 4 ( turya, some prefer writing turīya) will be found.

I hope to see more of your posts , they are most refreshing to read.
thank you. Please feel free to talk more of -->:<-- visvarga.


I say It is in space, It is in every nook and corner, in every pinpoint of space. There is no space where It is not; there is no space which It does not occupy." Risi Sanatkumara, Chhandogya Upanishad 3.24



pranams

srivijaya
01 May 2008, 05:25 AM
perhaps you may find it of interest, and may wish to comment on this matter.
Hi yajvan,
Many thanks for the link to this thread. I find the subject matter very interesting indeed but feel I can add little to it.

I tend to favour the definition of the 3 knots you quoted from Rajalakshmi
"The three knots are the knot of ignorance, knot of passion and knot of karma".

This is because after many years of struggling to get anywhere with a purely technical approach to kundalini, I have gained much success by switching my meditation to basic awareness and non-volitional release.

Within my system (Tibetan Highest Yoga Tantra) it is said that the prana and mind are linked. Where the mind goes, so goes the prana and vice versa.
In attempting to 'coerce' the prana around the body I have felt as if I'm putting the cart before the horse, although I have had some results with inner heat.

We know 'mind is the forerunner of all action', so now I work on mind and the results flow from that, rather than the other way around.

The Tibetans also state (in fairness) that one should observe strict celibacy, which I have not, and that one has more chance of success up to the age of 24 years, as beyond that time the vase body begins to deteriorate. I'm well beyond that now.

Swami Lakshmanjoo has a good section on the different kinds of Kundalini in his book "The Secret Supreme'. Cit Kundalini is the highest whilst Prana Kundalini (of which I have had some experience) is also acceptable.

Your original point was an enquiry into the nature of anava mala. My approach has been to directly investigate the 'I' and I don't mean in an intellectual way. The 'I' manifests as tension which can place itself at any point within the manifest field of mind and body. Locate this and observe it. It will dissolve, as if by magic. I equate the ego/I assumption (this tension) with anava mala. For me they are one and the same thing, a tangible event, rather than a philosophical stance.

The dissolution of this anava mala tension has enabled me to pass through the form Jhanas, as outlined in the Pali suttas and further into samhadi. Finding it is vipassana, releasing it is samatha.

It becomes ever more subtle and at some points it looks like its gone altogether but when one checks the mind during meditation break the truth is clear. Is there aversion or desire towards maya? Thus far is there ego and anava mala. They are inextricably linked.

Namaste

MahaHrada
01 May 2008, 09:50 AM
Namaste Mahahrada,
I see your point. Dualities, Sun and Moon; Night and day. It is the gap, sandhyā , where the treasure lies. As in amātrā, were the 4 ( turya, some prefer writing turīya) will be found.

I hope to see more of your posts , they are most refreshing to read.
thank you. Please feel free to talk more of -->:<-- visvarga.



Namaste Yajvan,

I am glad you appreciate my input. I like to go on with more posts but am cautious not to comment on matters beyond my competence and experience.

Visarga is the expression of unity and duality, the kashmiri pandits always implied the existence of the unifying bindu even when they where mentioning only visarga. When reading the texts we should do likewise.

That unity is present when one part is concealed by the full expansion of one principle, which is always, at the same time,the junction point of movement.

Attainment of the fourth is implied as a result when awareness of the three is established.

Visarga is central to agamic practice and thought and it is a highly technical matter so that there is danger that it is too sophisticated to be represented in a forum like this danger is also that it remains tarka only even if it is correctly represented, because the practical application is missing.

I was posting in this thread at first only to remind about a comprehensiveness of the trika kaula that includes many different approaches and allows a wide range of interpretations and trika contains a great variety of methods and paths, that are all in harmony with each other and are considered equally true and most of all are non competitive with each other.Which fact is sometimes hard to understand especially, judging from the viewpoint of a competitively oriented western mindset, which does usually allow only one interpretation, one&#180;s own is right other considered inferior or wrong.

The aim of trika is to realise the union of knowledge and the known, there is no place for competition with this goal in mind.

In trika we find several approaches according to the qualification of the person, no method is considered true and another false or one better than the other, so if there occurs a problem the fault is not with the method, its cause is lack of qualification or competency for that method. There is no generalisation or sectarian approach in trika philosophy, as far as i know.

People in Kali Yuga lack humility, contentment, peace and society is competitive. It is the Age of Strife. Sanatan Dharma is non competetive and is based solely on qualification even to that extent that it includes sampradayas that have a competitive approach to serve the needs of those that have a competitive mindset.

This thread has developed in a direction where i am not shure whether i am competent enough to display the subject matter in a correct way (according to trika kaula) because i do lack guidance of a trika master and my knowledge of trika is superficially only and maybe not up to the task.

I suspect as i said that these karikas are connected with a certain method of trika, i guess it maybe something similar as is elucidated in parts of the parA trisikA and it is connected with the emergence of the 16 vowels (visarga being the last of the 16 vowels of thesanskrit alphabet) in the hrtkamala ending in appaearnce of the visarga in the heart of bhairava, which can lead to highest attainment, but unfortunately i guess has to be practised under the guidance of a living trika teacher.

I have to admit that at the moment i do not as yet even comprehend that dharana sufficently enough, if i think i have managed, than i will try to use it as an example to elucidate what the visarga implies in the context of trika.

An edition and translation of the parA trisikA vivarana of Abhinavagupta has been published commented and edited by Jaidev Singh in 1988, i don&#180;t know if it is still available, also in sri vidya shastras there are a lot of references regarding the concept of Bindu Visarga and Bindukala, in the srividya tradition it is mentionend, especially in the kamakalavilasa of the hadimata school, this text exists in several editions.

Pranams

MahaHrada

yajvan
01 May 2008, 02:20 PM
Hari Om
~~~~~~

Namaste MahaHrada and srivijaya

thank you both for your well thought out posts. It is rewarding to talk to and listen to fellow practitioners of sadhana.


srivija, you mention the truth of mind being connected to prana. Yes, this is born out in the Upanishads and is also my experience. If you have interest there is this HDF post: http://www.hindudharmaforums.com/showthread.php?t=1462&highlight=prana+connected+mind (http://www.hindudharmaforums.com/showthread.php?t=1462&highlight=prana+connected+mind)


As you discuss 'basic awareness' meditation. Yes I understand what you say. I have been fortunate to apply this approach. I think complimenting it ( for me) with pranayam is a nice match. Also I am not 'big' on control techniques. I think it stifles ones ability to transcend. This is one reason why I enjoy the vij&#241;āna bhairava kārikās. Once this delicate awareness is recognized ( some say in place) , this restful alertness or sūkṣma-gati&#185;, then the kārikās have a foundation to work from. As Svami Sivananda suggests, 'An ounce of practice is better than tons of theory'

Regarding Svami Laksmanjoo - I have this book you mention and a few others by Svamiiji. He is a good writer and IMHO speaks from the level of Reality itself. I am fortunate to be reading many of his works.


MahaHrada,
I understand what you mean in your discussion on competition. I see this many places. Especially with the 6 systems of Indian Philosophy. They are so complete in themselves that many think they are independent. Hence, then the polemics of one school is better then another begins. My teacher has always said they are complementary ways of looking at Reality.

With the agamas, there's abheda, bhedabheda, and bheda. Within these offers the Tantras talk and describe the Truth as created and discussed by Śiva Himself. This is where I have put my attention as of late, and have focused more on Bhairava tantra wisdom.


Even as we see three types of Tantra agamas, they are designed to lead to Śiva. If you wish to extend the conversation in this direction, I will be gladly reading your posts.



pranams



1. sūkṣma-gati :
sūkṣma सूक्ष्म - subtle , keen ; minute , small , fine , thin
gati गति - arriving at , obtaining; state , condition

yajvan
03 June 2008, 11:29 PM
Hari Om
~~~~~

Namaste,

I was just reading the Spanda-kārikās¹, section 2, kārikās 6 and 7. It discusses the realization of the SELF. It says by this realization, the initiation of liberation leads to the identity with Śiva.

What is interesting is the discussion of initiation. We have talked about this before on HDF¹. Vasugupta, the author of the Spanda-kārikās suggests, that which gives the realization of the identity with Śiva is alone the real initiation for liberation. He uses the following quote:
Dīkshā is that which gives realization and destroys all impurities. Because it imparts that realization which awakens one from the sleep of ignorance there fore is called Dīkshā. It has the characteristic of both giving and destroying.

We know this dīkshā दीक्षा as initiation; some call this the exclusive occupation of spiritual development. If we look at the components we can see the characteristic of giving + destroying.

dī दी - is to to shine forth , excel ; be bright.
kṣa क्ष - destruction , loss

So in one word we have the brightness associated with the giving of light, passing on the light to the native. Yet destruction and loss is pointed out, but destruction and loss of what? Of ignorance or the impurities that are mentioned and the sloth of sleep.

Sleep is considered an example of ignorance, where one is not bright, or wake. And wakefulness on the other hand, is the other example of brightness, of light, where consciousness is aware, active.

I found these ślokas interesting and thought to pass it on as we enter the first light of the bright half of the month, sukla pratipada, owned by agni.

pranams



1. diksha discussion
http://www.hindudharmaforums.com/showthread.php?t=623 (http://www.hindudharmaforums.com/showthread.php?t=623)

Spanda-kārikā- The Divine Pulsation - translated to english by Jaideva Singh. he original composition is attributed to Vasugupta muni.

yajvan
23 June 2008, 02:02 PM
Hari Om
~~~~~

Namaste
Reading the Spanda kārikā-s I came across the definition of spanda on several occations. This word spanda is known as throbbing , throb , quiver , pulse , tremor , vibration , motion , activity. It suggests that pure consciousness has ~some~ movement, really spiritual dynamism, the cause for all movement, therefore potential.

I think as I read it more, it becomes clear that this spanda is the notion of Self-awareness of the Divine. The sage Utpaladeva talks of it this way:
The Divine is termed Maheśvara (or Great Lord) because of His ever-present, imutable vimṛiṣa (some spell vimarśa) or SELF-awareness. That SELF-awareness in its absolute freedom (svātantrya) constitutes Divine pure (ṣuddha) knowledge and activity.

For me, this suggests the movement or throb... the Divine being aware of itsSELF in ITs perfectly still state nirguna Brahman - some may call this nimeṣa; being aware, just aware of itSELF.

Kṣemarāja who is the comentator of the Spanda kārikā-s, tells us in the very beginning of his work that svarūpaspandaḥ, or spanda is the essental nature of Śiva. This is reviewed in the 1st section of the book within 25 kārikā-s ( verses).


Last, this freedom or svātantrya is much talked about. It's reflected as a triad or 3, that of icchā śakti, kriyā śakti and j&#241;āna śakti, the power of Divine Will, Action and Knowledge.

I will add a few more interesting points to the conversation as I find them. I thought the above was insightful and frankly enjoyable to write about.


pranams


words used

ṣuddha शुद्ध - cleansed , cleared , clean , pure , clear , bright , white
spanda स्पन्द - throbbing , throb , quiver , pulse , tremor , vibration , motion , activity . The muni Kṣemarāja, who is the comentator of the Spanda kārikā-s, suggests spanda is or connotes the absolute freedom (svātantra) of the Divine

srivijaya
05 October 2009, 04:41 PM
Hi yajvan,
Thanks for the link to this thread. I'd quite forgotten it. I'm currently reading The Doctrine of Vibration by Mark S.G. Dyczkowski.

One thing that has impressed me is the stance the Spanda exponents take regarding our everyday waking state. This is not considered to be anything other than an aspect of Siva in his contracted state.

There is no posited hidden "ultimate truth" behind it and it is not considered to be a fake or illusory condition, rather it is seen as one aspect of the dynamic of Siva/Shakti and there is no speculation beyond this.

I find this direct approach accords with my experience of movement into and out of samhadi. It is very honest and refreshing allowing us to observe movement as it is.

Namaste

yajvan
05 October 2009, 06:22 PM
hariḥ oṁ
~~~~~

Namast&#233;

It is interesting to note this spanda स्पन्द i.e. throbbing , throb , quiver , pulse , tremor , vibration , motion , activity, is different then how Vedānta views the Absolute. Vedānta sees it as absolutely still, without movement.

Now we look to the wisdom of Abhinavagupa-ji as he mentions,
spandana means somewhat of movement . The charactistic of 'somewhat' consists in the fact that even the immovable appears 'as if moving' because though the light of consciousness does not change in the least yet it appears to be changing as it were.


So we have agreement withVedānta - but what is this 'somewhat movement' ? It is Self-awareness, or vimaṛśa ( also vimṛśa). This vimaṛśa is reflection, reflected on, meditative. We can see how this word is ~Self-Awareness~ , the reflection back onto one's Self. This is the subtle activity that is being described here.


Vedānta may say the Absolute is completely Aware in its Self. This is the 'wakefulness' that Spanda-kārikā-s offer and hence kaśmir śaivism ( and śaivism ) offers as movement in the Divine Stillness.

praṇām

srivijaya
06 October 2009, 04:09 AM
Vedānta may say the Absolute is completely Aware in its Self. This is the 'wakefulness' that Spanda-kārikā-s offer and hence kaśmir śaivism ( and śaivism ) offers as movement in the Divine Stillness.


Some schools of Buddhism teach that absolute is not other than its indivisible luminosity. The first movement away from this is a recognition of luminosity by awareness.

Namaste