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vedic_kings
07 May 2006, 11:02 PM
I would like to know the differences between the two. Anyone here have a quick list?

Singhi Kaya
07 May 2006, 11:27 PM
It on questions like this I tend think hindu as a cultural identity and not a religion~however harmful to propagate that in this age.

If Yoga is in true sense of all inclusive yoga and not just few practices borrowed from hinduism or not a self satisfying mysticsm, then I don't know if there can be any difference. But I do think Yoga is possible in some sense outside dharma as a modern agnostic who practices yoga just to find about truth. He/she may have very little interest or understanding of the rest of Hinduism. I think such attitude is accepted in Yoga and yoga is not belief. Also this agnostic yogi must be a beginner:).

May be few other religions also have yoga in the hindu sense like buddhism, jainism and some such. So I can concur to a buddhist yogi~there were many in past days and still there are many.

But clearly one cannot have counter yogic ideals and still be a yogi. A muslim yogi or a christian yogi are just heresy from both perspectives (yoga and abrahamism), though such cults or individuals may exist.
Thus, the modern claims of commercial yoga masters of making yoga independent of beliefs or faiths just a marketing gimmick. I think most here agree to that if not all.

vedic_kings
08 May 2006, 01:46 PM
It on questions like this I tend think hindu as a cultural identity and not a religion~however harmful to propagate that in this age.

If Yoga is in true sense of all inclusive yoga and not just few practices borrowed from hinduism or not a self satisfying mysticsm, then I don't know if there can be any difference. But I do think Yoga is possible in some sense outside dharma as a modern agnostic who practices yoga just to find about truth. He/she may have very little interest or understanding of the rest of Hinduism. I think such attitude is accepted in Yoga and yoga is not belief. Also this agnostic yogi must be a beginner:).

May be few other religions also have yoga in the hindu sense like buddhism, jainism and some such. So I can concur to a buddhist yogi~there were many in past days and still there are many.

But clearly one cannot have counter yogic ideals and still be a yogi. A muslim yogi or a christian yogi are just heresy from both perspectives (yoga and abrahamism), though such cults or individuals may exist.
Thus, the modern claims of commercial yoga masters of making yoga independent of beliefs or faiths just a marketing gimmick. I think most here agree to that if not all.

I agree with what you have said. I think that without Dharma yoga would not exist.

willie
08 May 2006, 10:23 PM
Actually a lot of christian churches have a mindfulness sort of yoga or meditation that is quite popular in the US. It is attended by a lot of different people from a lot of different christian churches and there have been talks about it at universities plus some free seminars. It is some sort of buddhist practice that a some one came up with. It is suppost to help the practionar live in the moment.

So the whole yoga idea have moved out of the profit area into more of a free seminar approach. In that sense yoga can be seperated from underlying religious beliefs.

I see it as people who have a spiritual aspiration moving past the obstruction of most religions and going it alone to find the source of that aspiration.

sarabhanga
09 May 2006, 12:05 AM
Namaste VK,

Yoga is Union, which may be seen as total, or as a Yoking so as to form a perfect Twin.

And a Hindu is an Indu ~ a bright droplet or spark from the Sindhu, which flows ultimately from the Sun.

Hindu is essentially a synonym for Aditya ~ Son of Aditi ~ and aditi means “not tied, free, boundless, unbroken, entire, unimpaired, or happy”.

aditi is “freedom, security, or safety”, and also “boundlessness, immensity, inexhaustible abundance, unimpaired condition, perfection, or creative power”.

Aditi is one of the most ancient of the Devis ~ being “Infinity” or the “Eternal and Infinite Expanse”, often mentioned in the Rig Veda.

Aditi is the daughter of Daksha and the wife of Kashyapa ~ the mother of all the Adityas, and all of the Gods.

Aditi is known as a cow, or as milk, or as the sustaining earth itself; and most importantly She is known as speech.

All of this confirms the great antiquity and fundamental importance of Shaktism in Sanatana Dharma.

A true Hindu has an intimate link with Sarasvati, and the most traditional Hindus are all Sauras (devotees of Surya) at heart.

A Hindu Yogi is an eternal twin with the Sun ~ and a Hindu Yogi is a veritable Yama, one of the very first Twins of Sanatana Dharma.

Hinduism and Yoga are inseparable at their roots!

vedic_kings
09 May 2006, 11:19 AM
Hey thanks willie and sarabhanga!

Great info guys:)

I agree when sarabhanga says:

"Hinduism and Yoga are inseparable at their roots!"

Arjuna
09 May 2006, 03:29 PM
Namaste Sarabhanga,

Enjoyed Ur post :)


Aditi is known as a cow, or as milk, or as the sustaining earth itself; and most importantly She is known as speech.

This Vak reveals herself in Rigvedic Devi-suktam, where she says that she is “the First among gods”. In a later period same Vak became known as Matrika-shakti or Kundalini, which has a form of 51 letters of Devanagari.


All of this confirms the great antiquity and fundamental importance of Shaktism in Sanatana Dharma.

The ancient Vedic cult was essentiall Shaiva-Shakta. The two most important Vedas, Rik and Yajus, are Shakta and Shaiva by their spirit.
Shakti was worshipped in Vedas as Agni, and later she came to be known as Durga or Bhairavi. One of Upanishadic Shakti-mantras, Shatakshari, consists of three Vedic mantras: “Jatavedase…”, “Tryambakam…” and Gayatri (as per Tripuratapini). Its 100 letters make two successions of Matrika, which correspond to descending and ascending Kundalini.


A true Hindu has an intimate link with Sarasvati, and the most traditional Hindus are all Sauras (devotees of Surya) at heart.

In Shaivism this Surya is called [Martanda-]Bhairava, who is also a child of Devi, as Aditya of Aditi.


A Hindu Yogi is an eternal twin with the Sun ~ and a Hindu Yogi is a veritable Yama, one of the very first Twins of Sanatana Dharma.

And his Shakti is his Yami.


Hinduism and Yoga are inseparable at their roots!

Verily so!