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yajvan
26 December 2007, 06:53 PM
Hari Om
~~~~~


Namaste.

The Gregorian calender was adopted by Great Britain and its colonies in America in 1752, in which January 1st was restored as New Year's Day. From a Jyotish perspective there is no 'sky' event that correlates to the 'new year' being the 1st of January. The only thing close astrologically is the Winter solstice, when the sun starts its march back north, from the tropical ( or earth based) astrological perspective.

Yet it is a tradition that some usher in the new year at this time, some do not.


That said, as we head into 2008, I was hoping this post could offer best wishes and success to all on HDF and the world. Perhaps if you care to add a best wish, a positive acknowledgement to the HDF members & the family of man on this good earth, it would be uplifting for all.

As goes the collective consciousness of the world, so goes its actions. If you wish to add to this post of Satvic best wishes, we all on HDF look to your uplifting accolades.

I offer the following sankalpham ( sam or complete or perfect + klrp or be in order , to come into existence):

First I want to thank all those on HDF that have contributed to this site. Your desire for wisdom and for the communication of your knowledge is greatly appreciated, My wish if for this to continue and blossom in the coming year.
My other acknowledgement is for thanking satay for maintaining this site and allowing satsang to take place. We are better people for this site.
My wish and desire for the family of man on this good earth is for the light of pure consciousness to dawn and mature in all of us. That we remember who we are, exponents of Reality. That we wake up the same way that did Arjuna, as he said to the Lord, naṣṭo mohah smrtir labdhā - dispelled of my illusion my memory has been regained ( i.e. I remember who I really am) - in one word Caitanyamatma.
It is by His Grace that all this is possible... All Glory to Him who breathes out the Veda. ॐनमःिशवायpranams

devotee
26 December 2007, 08:11 PM
Thanks for the wishes, yajvan !
I wish Satay & all the forum members a very Happy New Year !

saidevo
26 December 2007, 09:00 PM
Namaste Yajvan.

Let me reciprocate your New Year greetings and wishes, back to you and all other members of HDFpuri!

The winter solstice is celebrated as the famous Makara Sankranti in India. In Andhra Pradesh and Tamilnadu, this festival is celebrated for three days in the middle of January. Yhe first day, Bhogi, is the day of purification: old and worn out possessions are destroyed in fire lit on the middle of the streets. The second day, when the month of Paush (Thai) begins, is a day of Sun worship, thanking the 'pratyaksha brahman' for a good harvest and praying for the onset of another prosperous year. This is also the day of 'arghya' (reverential offering) to the departed ancestors. And on the third day, the bulls and cows that brought about agricultural prosperity are honoured, worshipped and thanked.

In other states of India, Mahaka Sankaranti is celebrated as Vasanta Panchami, worshipping Goddess Sarasvati in Bengal, as lighting the Makara Jyoti at the Sabarimala Ayyappan temple in Kerala, with kite flying in Gujarat, as Lohri the festival of bonfire in Punjab, to mention a few.

May the New Year bring in more spiritual progress and prosperity to us members of HDF and to the world in general!

PS: Here are two links for information on the solstice:
http://www.candlegrove.com/solstice.html - origins and the world over
http://www.analemma.com/ - the math and science behind it

Eastern Mind
27 December 2007, 05:34 PM
Hari Om
~~~~~


Namaste.

The Gregorian calender was adopted by Great Britain and its colonies in America in 1752, in which January 1st was restored as New Year's Day. From a Jyotish perspective there is no 'sky' event that correlates to the 'new year' being the 1st of January. The only thing close astrologically is the Winter solstice, when the sun starts its march back north, from the tropical ( or earth based) astrological perspective.

Yet it is a tradition that some usher in the new year at this time, some do not.

pranams

I find it rather odd that Hindus at least in the west celebrate this day, and I have no idea why this day and not some other secular holidays like Labour Day or Arbor day. Is it celebrated in India too? Perhaps its just the convenience of everybody being off work. There is a Hindu New Year if I am not mistaken. (sarcasm) .
I will be boycotting our temple, just my own little way of not celebrating. Besides I prefer the really religious festivals. This one is more of a social event.
Having said that, Yajvan, your post is appreciated, as usual. I concur with sending out best wishes, any time of the year. My son sent me a Solstice card, which up here at latitude 54 is perhaps more noticeable than further south. The sun is very low in the south right now.
Regarding Hindu New Year, I've noticed that even different Hindu groups celebrate it on different days. There is a Tamil New Year and a Hindu New Year. Is there also a Telegu New year, a Marathi New Year, a Sikh New Year? etc. Of course I do know there is a Chinese New Year. Perhaps if we researched the whole of culture, we could celebrate New Year each day of the year, together with some of the planets humanity somewhere.
Calendars are just fascinating. The local Ukraine community celebrates Christmas on a different day than most folk, for example.

Then there is Thai Pongal at our temple. Being a Tamil temple mostly, it's celebrated in January. Since I am the only real farmer they know, I am sometimes the honored guest. So we stand outside at -20 Celsius or so boiling the pot of rice, and do the Pongal. Definitely not a day for a light dhoti, or bare feet. But its fun. Last year the pot was so creating steam in the cold that I could hardly see the top of the pot through all the condensing mist.

Then there is the transfer of panchangs over time, latitude, etc. This I find also 'funny'. The ethnocentricity comes about by using a panchang that was never written for this time or locality. Sunrise and sunset times are all off, not to mention the inauspicious (rahu) and auspicious daily times. Interesting. Yajvan, do you know of a universal panchang? Himalayan Academy has one, but I don't think its done for all locations. Perhaps I'm mistaken.

Long post, too much rambling. May peace be with all. Aum Namasivaya

nirotu
27 December 2007, 06:48 PM
Dear All Members:


May your journey in search for the truth bear much fruit in the coming years. May God bless each and every one with peace, joy and patience. I do believe that the barrier to know the truth is not in our Vision but in our own Consciousness. Let our Consciousness bloom in the presence of the divine like a beautiful flower blooming, unhindered, in the presence of the Sun.

Blessings,

saidevo
27 December 2007, 08:36 PM
Namaste EM.



I find it rather odd that Hindus at least in the west celebrate this day, and I have no idea why this day and not some other secular holidays like Labour Day or Arbor day. Is it celebrated in India too? Perhaps its just the convenience of everybody being off work. There is a Hindu New Year if I am not mistaken. (sarcasm) .


The Christian New Year Day is NOT celebrated in India as a religious festival, only as a social event, specially my some misguided Hindu youth, who burst crackers, roam the city roads in bikes and howl at passers by, and of course, end it up in a pub or club with alcohol and dance. In the guise of various types of dances (that do not include Hindu classical dances), big hotels in Indian cities showcase obscenity on the New Year eve and fleece the gullible rich.



Regarding Hindu New Year, I've noticed that even different Hindu groups celebrate it on different days. There is a Tamil New Year and a Hindu New Year. Is there also a Telegu New year, a Marathi New Year, a Sikh New Year? etc.


Wiki has a good article on the Hindu calendar and its regional variants:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hindu_calendar



Then there is Thai Pongal at our temple. Being a Tamil temple mostly, it's celebrated in January. Since I am the only real farmer they know, I am sometimes the honored guest. So we stand outside at -20 Celsius or so boiling the pot of rice, and do the Pongal. Definitely not a day for a light dhoti, or bare feet. But its fun. Last year the pot was so creating steam in the cold that I could hardly see the top of the pot through all the condensing mist.


Pongal-cooking and offering in front of temples is done in Tamilnadu, not only on the Thai Pongal day, but also in return for fulfilment of some prayers to specific deities. Brahmins, however, generally prefer to celebrate the Thai Pongal festival in their homes and not in temples.

Arvind Sivaraman
28 December 2007, 01:58 AM
Hari Om
~~~~~


Namaste.

The Gregorian calender was adopted by Great Britain and its colonies in America in 1752, in which January 1st was restored as New Year's Day. From a Jyotish perspective there is no 'sky' event that correlates to the 'new year' being the 1st of January. The only thing close astrologically is the Winter solstice, when the sun starts its march back north, from the tropical ( or earth based) astrological perspective.

Yet it is a tradition that some usher in the new year at this time, some do not.


That said, as we head into 2008, I was hoping this post could offer best wishes and success to all on HDF and the world. Perhaps if you care to add a best wish, a positive acknowledgement to the HDF members & the family of man on this good earth, it would be uplifting for all.

As goes the collective consciousness of the world, so goes its actions. If you wish to add to this post of Satvic best wishes, we all on HDF look to your uplifting accolades.

I offer the following sankalpham ( sam or complete or perfect + klrp or be in order , to come into existence):

First I want to thank all those on HDF that have contributed to this site. Your desire for wisdom and for the communication of your knowledge is greatly appreciated, My wish if for this to continue and blossom in the coming year.
My other acknowledgement is for thanking satay for maintaining this site and allowing satsang to take place. We are better people for this site.
My wish and desire for the family of man on this good earth is for the light of pure consciousness to dawn and mature in all of us. That we remember who we are, exponents of Reality. That we wake up the same way that did Arjuna, as he said to the Lord, naṣṭo mohah smrtir labdhā - dispelled of my illusion my memory has been regained ( i.e. I remember who I really am) - in one word Caitanyamatma.
It is by His Grace that all this is possible... All Glory to Him who breathes out the Veda. ॐनमःिशवायpranams

Om Shirdi Sai Ram.
Namaste Yajvan.
Wish you and all the members of HDF an advanced Happy New Year 2008.(As you have mentioned,though Jan 1 is not a new year according to Hindu Tradition.)

Eastern Mind
28 December 2007, 07:14 AM
Namaste EM.


The Christian New Year Day is NOT celebrated in India as a religious festival, only as a social event,

Wiki has a good article on the Hindu calendar and its regional variants:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hindu_calendar


Pongal-cooking and offering in front of temples is done in Tamilnadu, not only on the Thai Pongal day, but also in return for fulfilment of some prayers to specific deities. Brahmins, however, generally prefer to celebrate the Thai Pongal festival in their homes and not in temples.

Saidevo: Good to hear about the Christian New year not being celebrated. I think we should make efforts to keep things multicultural. The holy days are particularly difficult here though as business is run on the western system. There have been some successful court cases for special days off to celebrate each one's own religion. I've though of challenging it, but never did. The day after Mahasivaratri would have been my choice, based on the question, "Why do I have to lose a day's pay when others (Christmas) don't? Here in Canada the government actually has a multicultural policy. It would be too bad if the world lost all of its calendars, not just the Hindu ones but the Chinese, etc. etc.
So do you 'think' in Indian months, like Thai, or do you go with the Gregorian months? Or is it a blend of both?
Aum Namasivaya

saidevo
28 December 2007, 09:25 AM
Namaste EM.



The holy days are particularly difficult here though as business is run on the western system. There have been some successful court cases for special days off to celebrate each one's own religion.


Since Hindus and people of other religions are in large numbers, the US, Canada and other western countries should indeed grant 'paid and optional leave' to people of those religions. Without such liberal policy, there is no use in singing Vedic hymns in Senates or greeting the Hindus on their important festivals. When they have (I think) over a week's celebrations and holiday for the Christmas and New Year, why not spare two days or more for Hindus and other religious people?



It would be too bad if the world lost all of its calendars, not just the Hindu ones but the Chinese, etc. etc.
So do you 'think' in Indian months, like Thai, or do you go with the Gregorian months? Or is it a blend of both?


I don't think the non-Gregorian calendars would be lost, though their official usage, specially in India, is practically nil. Hindus in India do use their own (religional variety of) calendar for all auspicious and inauspicious things in their life. But if you ask an urban Hindu about the Hindu date of the day, he/she will most likely be unaware of it. A Hindu villager will be familiar with and use the Hindu calendar in his/her daily life though.

In Tamil calendar, today is the 12th of the month of Margazhi in the 5108th year of the Kali Era. I do look up these details every day in the calendar and keep myself conscious of the Hindu calendar of the day (the daily sheet calendars have all such details), though I need to use the Gregorian calendar in my postings, correspondence and other personal work. On occasions such as marriage, upanayanam, etc. when we print invitations, we use the Hindu calendar details prominently. In fact, I would like to use today's date as 5108-09-12 KE besides the Gregorian date 2007-12-28, but unfortunately, the Tamil and other South Indian Hindu date is at too much variance with their equivalents in the North India, so there can be no uniformity. As a minimum, we Hindus should remember the year 5108 in the Kali Era, as it highlights the hoary ancientness of the Hindu dharma and culture.

Hindus who perform pujas and religious ceremonies (most do though maybe in a simple way) trace the current Hindu date from the day of the current Brahma and those who care to know the details are proud of it.

yajvan
28 December 2007, 10:23 AM
Hari Om
~~~~~

Namaste saidevo and EM,

a nice introduction and review of the vedic calendar system is offered here:
https://www.himalayanacademy.com/cgi-bin/download.cgi?func=download.showPage&file=/resources/panchangam/pancha_intro.PDF

EM, I think you will recognize the site - Himalayan Academy Publications.

AND, a pachang for your area in the world is also offered here ( same authors as above): http://www.himalayanacademy.com/resources/panchangam/

A good reference to consider.

pranams,

saidevo
30 December 2007, 10:11 AM
The New Year Wishes Tower of Babel
(from a mail by the Orkut activist Vikas Joshi)
(Please add the wish in Sanskrit)


*Afgani*................*Saale Nao Mubbarak*
*Afrikaans*.............*Gelukkige nuwe jaar*
*Albanian*..............*Gezuar Vitin e Ri*
*Armenian*..............*Snorhavor Nor Tari*
*Arabic*................*Antum salimoun*
*Assyrian*..............*Sheta Brikhta*
*Azeri*.................*Yeni Iliniz Mubarek!*
*Bengali*...............*Shuvo Nabo Barsho*
*Bulgarian*.............*Chestita Nova Godina")*
*Cambodian*.............*Soursdey Chhnam Tmei*
*Catalan*...............*FELI√‡ ANY NOU*
*Chinese*...............*Xin Nian Kuai Le*
*Corsican.Lang*.........*Pace e Salute*
*Croatian*..............*Sretna Nova godina!*
*Cymraeg(Welsh)*........*Blwyddyn Newydd Dda*
*Denish*................*Godt Nytår*
*Dhivehi*...............*Ufaaveri Aa Aharakah Edhen*
*Dutch*.................*GELUKKIG NIEUWJAAR!*
*Eskimo*................*Kiortame pivdluaritlo*
*Esperanto*.............*Felican Novan Jaron*
*Estonians*.............*Head uut aastat!*
*Ethiopian:*............*MELKAM ADDIS AMET YIHUNELIWO!*
*Finnish*...............*Onnellista Uutta Vuotta*
*French*................*Bonne Annee*
*Gaelic*................*Bliadhna mhath ur*
*Galician.[NWSpain]*....*Bo Nadal e Feliz Aninovo*
*German*................*Prosit Neujahr*
*Greek*.................*Kenourios Chronos*
*Gujarati*..............*Nutan Varshbhinandan*
*Hawaiian*..............*Hauoli Makahiki Hou*
*Hebrew*................*L'Shannah Tovah*
*Hindi*.................*Naye Varsha Ki Shubhkamanyen*
*Hong.kong*.............*(Cantonese) Sun Leen Fai Lok*
*Hungarian*.............*Boldog Ooy Ayvet*
*Indonesian*............*Selamat Tahun Baru*
*Iranian*...............*Saleh now mobarak*
*Iraqi*.................*Sanah Jadidah*
*Irish*.................*Bliain nua fe mhaise dhuit*
*Italian:*..............*Felice anno nuovo*
*Japan:*................*Akimashite Omedetto Gozaimasu*
*Kabyle:*...............*Asegwas Amegaz*
*Kannada:*..............*Hosa Varushadha Shubhashayagalu*
*Kisii:*................*SOMWAKA OMOYIA OMUYA*
*Khmer:*................*Sua Sdei tfnam tmei*
*Korea:*................*Saehae Bock Mani ba deu sei yo!*
*Kurdish:*..............*NEWROZ PIROZBE*
*Latvian*...............*Laimńęgo Jauno Gadu!*
*Lithuanian:*...........*Laimingu Naujuju Metu*
*Laotian:*..............*Sabai dee pee mai*
*Macedonian*............*Srekjna Nova Godina*
*Madagascar*............*Tratry ny taona*
*Malay*.................*Selamat Tahun Baru*
*Marathi*...............*Nveen Varshachy Shubhechcha*
*Malayalam*.............*Puthuvatsara Aashamsakal*
*Maltese*...............*Is-Sena t- Tajba*
*Nepal*.................*Nawa Barsha ko Shuvakamana*
*Norwegian*.............*Godt Nyttår*
*Papua.New.Guinea*......*Nupela yia i go long yu*
*Pampango(Philippines)*.*Masaganang Bayung Banua*
*Pashto*................*Nawai Kall Mo Mubarak Shah*
*Persian*...............*Saleh now ra tabrik migouyam*
*Philippines*...........*Manigong Bagong Taon*
*Polish:*...............*Szczesliwego Nowego Roku*
*Portuguese*............*Feliz Ano Novo*
*Punjabi*...............*Nave sal di mubarak*
*Romanian*..............*AN NOU FERICIT*
*Russian*...............*S Novim Godom*
*Samoa*.................*Manuia le Tausaga Fou*
*Serbo-Croatian*........*Sretna nova godina*
*Sindhi*................*Nayou Saal Mubbarak Hoje*
*Singhalese*............*Subha Aluth Awrudhak Vewa*
*siraiki*...............*Nawan Saal Shala Mubarak Theevay*
*Slovak*................*Stastny Novy rok*
*slovenian*.............*sreèno novo leto*
*Somali*................*Iyo Sanad Cusub Oo Fiican!*
*Spanish*...............*Feliz Ano ~Nuevo*
*Swahili*...............*Heri Za Mwaka Mpya¬ļ*
*Swedish*...............*GOTT NYTT √…R! /Gott nytt √•r!*
*Sudanese*..............*Warsa Enggal*
*Tamil*.................*Eniya Puthandu Nalvazhthukkal*
*Telegu*................*Noothana samvatsara shubhakankshalu*
*Thai*..................*Sawadee Pee Mai*
*Turkish*...............*Yeni Yiliniz Kutlu Olsun*
*Ukrainian*.............*Shchastlyvoho Novoho Roku*
*Urdu*..................*Naya Saal Mubbarak Ho*
*Uzbek*.................*Yangi Yil Bilan*
*Vietnamese*............*Chuc Mung Tan Nien*
*Welsh*.................*Blwyddyn Newydd Dda!*

sm78
01 January 2008, 03:25 AM
Happy 2008 everybody...one of the bright aspects being an off-day from work.

satay
01 January 2008, 10:19 AM
Namaste,

Wishing you all a great, happy, healthy New Year!

I hope that in this new year all your desires and wishes come true.

sm78
02 January 2008, 01:23 AM
An outcome of new year drunken orgy
http://www.ndtv.com/convergence/ndtv/story.aspx?id=NEWEN20080037486&ch=1/2/2008%2011:52:00%20AM

yajvan
02 January 2008, 06:29 PM
Hari Om
~~~~~~



An outcome of new year drunken orgy



Namaste,

Welcome to kali yuga. Now how does one keep their balance of mind?
My teacher says, when one looks at a rose, look to the blossoms and the fragrance, the beautiful red and not much put your attention on the thorns.

I try and do this, yet find some angst when I see how people choose to behave in such a manner.

pranams,

saidevo
02 January 2008, 07:38 PM
The girls are also to be blamed in this issue, besides giving a deterrent punishment to the offenders. What is the necessity for the girls to attend booze parties along with their boy friends whatever their social/official position, unless they happen to be in bureaucracy, diplomacy or politics? It is totally against the Indian culture and tradition. I know of girls in the IT sector who wear 'bindi', don't booze or even take excessive coffeine and don't attend booze parties while still maintaining their dignity and prestige in work.

Let us use the technology and knowledge from the West for our benefit but maintain our culture and tradtion in our lives.

yajvan
03 January 2008, 10:45 AM
Hari Om
~~~~~


The girls are also to be blamed in this issue, besides giving a deterrent punishment to the offenders.


Namaste,

as they say, its a shame that 'youth' is wasted on the young.http://www.hindudharmaforums.com/images/icons/icon7.gif


pranams

vinayak.gokhale
11 February 2008, 07:55 PM
Another good site as Agnideva has mentioned in his previous post is http://www.mypanchang.com . Excellant site for tamils, telugus, Gujarati, Marathi, Rajastani, Punjabi, UP, Bihari etc.....


Hari Om
~~~~~

Namaste saidevo and EM,

a nice introduction and review of the vedic calendar system is offered here:
https://www.himalayanacademy.com/cgi-bin/download.cgi?func=download.showPage&file=/resources/panchangam/pancha_intro.PDF

EM, I think you will recognize the site - Himalayan Academy Publications.

AND, a pachang for your area in the world is also offered here ( same authors as above): http://www.himalayanacademy.com/resources/panchangam/

A good reference to consider.

pranams,