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yajvan
16 June 2008, 02:28 PM
Hari Om
~~~~~

Namaste,

This post is inspired by a current HDF post called How do you realize the Absolute ? found in Sanatana Dharma Folder under the sub-folder of Advaita. Many good ideas are being discussed there. I thought to take just a different angle on this notion, and thought this folder would be the best fit.

This word, sound, mantra aham is of great interest. Some call this parā vāk the Supreme Word or Sound. This parā vāk is also identified as 'She' or Śrī Devī. More on Śrī Devī and this Aham in an additional follow-up post.

When we look at this aham we can look at it as a +ha+m.The letter a denotes Śiva , ha denotes Śakti and m denotes nara, or all manifested life, people, society, etc. This aham is also known as sṛṣṭi-bija or the seed of creation.

It is quite interesting to note that in the Bhāgavad gītā , Kṛṣṇa calls out in Chapt 10.33 of the letters (akṣarāṇām) I am akāra ( or the letter/sound a ). This is the 1st letter/sound as we know. From a all other sounds become possible. So from this a as Śiva , creation manifests by ha or Śakti and this manifestation brings the multiplicity of this universe m or nara.

Yet there is another view on this also. If we take aham and look at it backwards ma+ha+a (some say mahā). We know this mahā as 'great' . This mahā ( some write mahah) is found in the Taittrīya Upaniṣad and ṛṣi Mahācaṃasya . He speaks of this mahā as vyahriti or the sacred utterance, as Brahman. He also instructs that bhu, buhvah, and suvah ( typically associated with the Gayatri) are contained in this Mahā.

It is said from this reversal of aham or ma-ha-a , it is the absorption, enterence, or preveśa¹ back to Śiva. In this order, ma denotes nara, ha is Śakti and a , as before, remains Śiva. They call this mahā saṃhāra bija or the seed-sound that brings together or draws one back. But back to what? To a or Śiva.

What is so vitally interesting about this is the method of saṃhāra is found in Patañjali's yoga darśana¹ ( Chapt 2, sūtra 10) - In this school it is brought to light as pratiprasava, reversing the birth process. That is, thoughts have 'births'. One upāya or meditation is the process of reversing this thinking process to arrive back at the Source.
It's like going to work every day. One gets in their car, or public transportation and goes to work. What do you do when you come home? You reverse the process, pratipradava, daily.

When we look at this knowledge above one can note the string of continuity , the sameness (samatā) that can be found. Yet there are several schools here that are offered. The knowledge is found in the following śāstra-s: Parā-trīśikā Vivaraṇa¹ + Bhāgavad gītā + Taittrīya Upaniṣad + Patañjal's Yogasarsana (some just call the Yogasūtra-s).

I am sure one can look for differences, but this is not my vision or intent as of late. We have so much diversity in this world. Just look around not just in nature, but in what mankind has created. I find it these days more 'unique' to find the underlying unity in the diversity of creation.
From this point of view it is the intent to see how this diversity all culminates in anuttara¹. It is the union (saṃghaṭṭa) of a+ha+m by way of ma+ha+a that stimulates different techniques (upāya-s , meditations, dhāranā-s, etc) to come into play. But what does not change? Anuttara, the Supreme, we may also call it turīyatīta.

Last, I mention different techniques - this suggests different views on the approach to Reality. I find it healthy for us to talk of this ( yet I am not much for boxing :) ). This is one reason why I chose the word saṃghaṭṭa. Not only does it mean union, but it's also defined as rubbing or clashing together i.e some friction. Some times our views may be different i.e. the views on how we get to anuttara, the Supreme. This is fine as we better understand the different schools and methods of others. For this, IMHO, we can become more knowledgable and a better person.

As in rubbing two sticks to make fire, both sticks combine to reach the goal. It is when one stick's intention is fire and the other stick is thinking about poking and prodding, some discomfort is felt. For this I think we are mature people, and can keep to thinking how we ignite agni.


pranams

Words and references
posted on Monday, śukla chaturdaśi, owned by śiva.


aham अहम् - I
This is the work of Abhinavagupta - Parā-trīśikā Vivaraṇa -or- That (Śrī Devī) who transcends and is Identical with trika. It also means That which speaks out (kāyati) the three (tri) śakti-s (śa) of the Supreme (parā). Vivaraṇa means the act of uncovering, opening, or explanation.
Sṛṣṭibija - sṛṣṭi सृष्टि is manifestation, production , procreation , creation , the creation of the world ( letting loose!) + bija बीज is seed i.e. any germ , element , primary cause or principle , source , origin.
preveśa प्रवेश - coming or setting in ; a place of entrance ;entering , entrance , penetration or intrusion into
Saṃhāra संहार - bringing together , collection , accumulation ; contraction; drawing in
pratiprasava प्रतिप्रसव - return to the original state ; counter-order , suspension of a general prohibition in a particular case ; an HDF post on this subject: http://www.hindudharmaforums.com/showthread.php?t=1462&highlight=Patanjali (http://www.hindudharmaforums.com/showthread.php?t=1462&highlight=Patanjali)
anuttara अनुत्तर - chief , principal, Ultimate; Abhinavagupta's words on this anuttara is na vidyate uttaram adhilam yataḥ, or that which there is nothing more or additional.
saṃghaṭṭa संघट्ट - union; rubbing or clashing together , friction

TatTvamAsi
16 June 2008, 06:44 PM
Hari Om
~~~~~

Namaste,
...
From a all other sounds become possible. So from this a as Śiva , creation manifests by ha or Śakti and this manifestation brings the multiplicity of this universe m or nara.
...


Namaste Yajvan,

An interesting corollary to the above statement is the first aphorism in the Thirukkural!

Ch.1 v.1: "Agara mudhala ezhutthellaam, aadhi bhagavan mudhattrae ulagu."

Also, can you describe how you arrived at, or from where you got, the description that 'a' is Siva, 'ha' is Sakti, and 'm' is nara? I would like to read more about it.

Thanks.

Subham.

yajvan
16 June 2008, 08:22 PM
Hari Om
~~~~~

Namaste Yajvan,
Also, can you describe how you arrived at, or from where you got, the description that 'a' is Siva, 'ha' is Sakti, and 'm' is nara? I would like to read more about it.


Namaste TatTvamAsi,
Please consider the the work of Abhinavagupta - Parā-trīśikā Vivaraṇa.
My version is by a few I find reliable on this matter - Jaideva Singh did the English translations and notes, Svami Laksmanjoo did all sanskrit text correction , technical points, etc. and Bettina Baumer did the editing of the book. The book is offered by Motilal Banardsidas Publishers.

Let me offer MHO. If you are ~relatively new~ to tantra and the trika system IMHO this ( for me) would not be book one to start with, but again, that is me. Let me know if I can be of further assistence.

ps - the study of Mātrikācakra or the study/theory of akṣarāṇām mentioned , the sanskrit alphabet is part of the richness of this knowledge. Also known as Mālini or Śrī Devī who wears a garland of 50 letters (the sanskrit alphabet). The difference between Mātrikācakra and Mālini is the arrangement letters i.e. vowels then consonents, etc.

I am a novice (at best) learning sanskrit appropriately. Many others on HDF will have more knowledge and I look for their help and corrections along the way.

Hope this helps...




pranams

yajvan
17 June 2008, 04:42 PM
Hari Om
~~~~~



Namaste TatTvamAsi,
Please consider the the work of Abhinavagupta - Parā-trīśikā Vivaraṇa.
My version is by a few I find reliable on this matter - Jaideva Singh did the English translations and notes, Svami Laksmanjoo did all sanskrit text correction , technical points, etc. and Bettina Baumer did the editing of the book. The book is offered by Motilal Banardsidas Publishers.



Namaste tatTvamAsi,
I was thinking of another book that does a nice job of outlining the sanskrit alphabet from a ( anuttara) to ḥ ,which is visarga and in devanāhgarī takes the symbol :

IN the book Kaśmir Śaivism - The Secret Supreme, the second chapter is Mātṛikācara and the theory of the alphabet. Here you will find a review of śiva śakti and śiva-s energy as it relates to the letters of the alphabet. The chapter will review , among other things 5 śakti-s found in the alphabet:


cit śakti - that śakti of consciousness
ānanda śakti - of bliss
icchā śakti - of will
jnāna śakti - of knowledge
kriyā śakti - of action Just an idea for your consideration.

pranams

srivijaya
18 June 2008, 04:26 AM
This thread brought to mind things I have read by Sri Ramana Maharshi. I find his approach to be very sublime indeed and have gained much benefit from his teachings.

16. What is the nature of the Self?
What exists in truth is the Self alone. The world, the individual soul, and God are appearances in it. like silver in mother-of-pearl, these three appear at the same time, and disappear at the same time. The Self is that where there is absolutely no “I” thought. That is called “Silence”. The Self itself is the world; the Self itself is “I”; the Self itself is God; all is Siva, the Self.
From a free online book "Who am I?" at this site:
http://www.sriramanamaharshi.org/booksfordownlaod.html

Namaste

yajvan
18 June 2008, 01:45 PM
Hari Om
~~~~~

This thread brought to mind things I have read by Sri Ramana Maharshi. I find his approach to be very sublime indeed and have gained much benefit from his teachings.

Namaste srivijaya,

thank you for your post. My teacher talked often about this silence. One experiences internally, the over time with the advancement of ones sādhana, this silence is experienced in creation, on the level of the senses. For me, the internal silence is experienced during meditation, yet I have a ways to go to experience it in creation.

For Śrī Rāmāna Mahaṛṣi 'The Self itself is the world' was his experience no doubt. What a delight to know this is possible and there are beings amongst us that accomplished this.


I hope you will share more of Mahaṛṣi-ji's insights and observations.


when the infinite vibrates, the worlds appear to emerge - ṛṣi vaśiṣṭha

pranams

yajvan
18 June 2008, 07:41 PM
Hari Om
~~~~~

namaste srivijaya (et al.)


When I read your post again, I also thought of the śloka found in the Spanda-kārikā-s¹. The 2nd niḥṣyanda (section) 5th kārikā says the following:

Iti vā yasya saṃvittiḥ kriḍāvenākhilam jagat |
Sa paśyan satataṃ yukto jīvanmukto na saṃśataḥ ||

Or(vā) Iti (in this manner , thus) he who has (yasya or endeavored) the realization (saṃvittiḥ ~ understanding) i.e. identity of his SELF with the whole universe (jagat) being constantly united (yukto) with the Divine (venā), views the entire world as the play (kriḍā) of the SELF with Śva, and is liberated while alive (jīvanmukto), there is no doubt (na saṃśataḥ) about that.

I thought how well this aligns with what you posted from Śrī Rāmāna Mahaṛṣi

The Self is that where there is absolutely no “I” thought. That is called “Silence”. The Self itself is the world; the Self itself is “I”; the Self itself is God; all is Siva, the Self.

The identity of the SELF with the Universe with Śiva... a continuum of silence.

pranams


Key words and References

saṃvittiḥ संवित्ति - knowledge , intellect , understanding ; perception , feeling , sense
yasya यस्य - to be endeavoured ( a conscientious or concerted effort toward an end)
jagat जगत् - the world, universe; also that which moves or is alive
yukto or yukti युक्ति - union , junction , connection , combination ; sum total; also mixture or alloying of metals
jīvanmukto - jīvanmukta जीवन्मुक्त - mancipated while still alive (i.e.liberated before death from all liability to future births
saṃśataḥ संशय without doubt ;uncertainty , irresolution, hesitation
sa स procuring , bestowing
kriḍāvenākhilam - kriḍ क्रीड् to sport, play; venā as vena वेन a Divine Being; khilam is work in process - I do not understand the application of this word in the sentence structure - all help is welcomed.Spanda-kārikā-s the Divine Creative Pulsation translated by Jaideva Singh ; original author is Vasugupta . Then his cela, Kallaṭa took to publizing this knowledge. The Spanda-kārikā-s are a perfect adjunct to the Śiva-sūtras

srivijaya
19 June 2008, 12:31 PM
When I read your post again, I also thought of the śloka found in the Spanda-kārikā-s¹

Hi yajvan,
Yes, I also find the Spanda-kārikā-s to be very helpful.

Regarding the teachings of Sri Ramana Maharshi, this passage has striking parallel's to Buddha's teachings on anatta (not-self)

1. Who am I ?
The gross body which is composed of the seven humours (dhatus), I am not; the five cognitive sense organs, viz. the senses of hearing, touch, sight, taste, and smell, which apprehend their respective objects, viz. sound, touch, colour, taste, and odour, I am not; the five cognitive senseorgans,
viz. the organs of speech, locomotion, grasping, excretion, and procreation, which have as their respective functions speaking, moving, grasping, excreting, and enjoying, I am not; the five vital airs, prana, etc., which perform respectively the five functions of in-breathing, etc., I am not;
even the mind which thinks, I am not; the nescience too, which is endowed only with the residual impressions of objects, and in which there are no objects and no functioning’s, I am not.

2. If I am none of these, then who am I?
After negating all of the above-mentioned as ‘not this’, ‘not this’, that Awareness which alone remains - that I am.

3. What is the nature of Awareness?
The nature of Awareness is existence-consciousness-bliss

This passage alone is truly magnificent, as we can see how much we need to abandon in order to attain to the state of Siva. In contrast to the teachings of the Theravadan school, the true nature of the being is considered to be "existence-consciousness-bliss", whereas the Theravadans teach that the stream of consciousness is extinguished upon the attainment of Nirvana after death.

I find the Theravadan presentation to be too nihilistic by far. The Monist Shaivite and Higher Mahayana schools are closer to my heart in this regard.

The only difference I can find between the teachings of Sri Ramana Maharshi and the Spanda, is that he considers the world illusory, whereas the Spanda teaches no such thing. In this respect I tend to agree with the Spanda, as objects of the senses do not need to be evaluated in this way. They are as they are.

Namaste

yajvan
19 June 2008, 07:01 PM
Hari Om
~~~~~

Hi yajvan,
Yes, I also find the Spanda-kārikā-s to be very helpful.

Regarding the teachings of Sri Ramana Maharshi, this passage has striking parallel's to Buddha's teachings on anatta (not-self)


This passage alone is truly magnificent, as we can see how much we need to abandon in order to attain to the state of Siva. In contrast to the teachings of the Theravadan school, the true nature of the being is considered to be "existence-consciousness-bliss", whereas the Theravadans teach that the stream of consciousness is extinguished upon the attainment of Nirvana after death.

I find the Theravadan presentation to be too nihilistic by far. The Monist Shaivite and Higher Mahayana schools are closer to my heart in this regard.

The only difference I can find between the teachings of Sri Ramana Maharshi and the Spanda, is that he considers the world illusory, whereas the Spanda teaches no such thing. In this respect I tend to agree with the Spanda, as objects of the senses do not need to be evaluated in this way. They are as they are.

Namaste srivijaya
Thank you for your post and quotes you offer. Yes this thing called māyā, many people have commented on it. Many take it for granted as the position of this world. I can see how it works within the schools that call it out.

I have also given it some thought ( as have many others) and we posted some of this thinking on this HDF post http://www.hindudharmaforums.com/showthread.php?t=1768&highlight=maya (http://www.hindudharmaforums.com/showthread.php?t=1768&highlight=maya)

Also in kaśmir śaivism 36 tattva-s (elements) are called out that define all of creation from the objective to the pure subjective (aham). Within the 36 there is a group called the ṣaṭ (some write ṣaḍ) kañcuka-s or the 6 coverings, I prefer calling them limitations¹. One of the six that are called out is māyā. It is these 6 that bind and tangle therefore limit.
This māyā is called the illusion of individuality. This is a bit different then calling the world an illusion. It is said by Svāmi Laksmanjoo at the time of real knowledge (when anuttara dawns) then this māyā is transformed into His (Śiva) śakti. When puruṣa (meaning the individual-being in kaśmir śaivism) māyā becomes glory for him. It's the notion when puruṣa realizes his/her real nature, this upliftment occurs, the transformation of limitations of the individual (i.e. māyā) is re-scaled to Universal levels. And re-scaled too is not the best word. It is the re-recognition, pratyabhijña, of ones Universal status.

Thank you again for the post and the wise words of Śrī Rāmāna Mahaṛṣi - they are always welcomed and warmly received.


pranams

1. 5 kañcuka-s are reviewed in this HDF post: http://www.hindudharmaforums.com/showthread.php?t=3077

srivijaya
20 June 2008, 12:44 PM
It is said by Svāmi Laksmanjoo at the time of real knowledge (when anuttara dawns) then this māyā is transformed into His Śiva) śakti. When puruṣa (meaning the individual-being in kaśmir śaivism) māyā becomes glory for him. It's the notion when puruṣa realizes his/her real nature, this upliftment occurs, the transformation of limitations of the individual (i.e. māyā) is re-scaled to Universal levels. And re-scaled too is not the best word. It is the re-recognition, pratyabhijña, of ones Universal status.

Hi yajvan,
I also find Laksmanjoo's presentation of maya to be sublime and accurate. This struck me when I read his Secret Supreme and has stayed with me since. I am discussing a similar subject with a teacher on a Dzogchen list, who posted this response to a question of mine. I present it here for your consideration , as I feel it is an excellent piece and quite relevant:

In Dzogchen, the Natural State as the primordially pure Awareness, Rigpa, has two intrinsic aspects: One is primordial purity known as Kadag, which is the Essence as Emptiness or the Dharmakaya. The Dharmakaya has no residue of karmic afflictions and never has. The second aspect is called Spontaneous Manifestation or Lhundrub. This is the radiance of the Dharmakaya that are like the sun's rays. Both aspects are pure as are all energies at all times. Out of this pure energy arises a series of consciousness activities and subtle energies that appear as an entity of independent existence. There is a limited quasi-awareness as this consciousness which is known as ego-mind. It lives only in the world of make-believe and thought. The Dharmakaya is manifesting this pseudo-entity of consciousness, just like other energy manifestions like planets, stars, trees and animals. The difference is that these apparent physical objects appear out there as separate from us at the viewpoint from which we perceive but the pseudo-self appears as the vantage point itself from which we perceive as subject. It is this pseudo subject that has residue of karmic history or not, not Awareness, as Awareness has no karmic history or seeds from karmic activities. Dzogchen points to this directly, and thereby overturns the erroneous views of all the other yanas that conceive of a Nirvanic state with residue. Our Natural State has always been residue free and still is. That is why there is no practice necessary in Dzogchen and there is nothing to purify. Hence no concept of cessation as no arising is an obstacle. Cessation is important for the ego-mind that is attempting to free itself from suffering. Cessation would be the ending of the dream concerning that arising of ego-consciousness... but the arising of the dream of ego or not is of no concern to our Natural State, as the dream is itself the crea tive display of the Dharmakaya itself. This is known in Dzogchen to be pure sport or God playing hide-and-go-seek with Himself by putting on the various masks of His own making. He is the only player in town afterall...

What does this experience feel like? When the Natural State is experiencing itself as itself, not its display including the display of ego-mind... this is abundantly clear that one's essence or Being is primordially perfect and changeless just as it is. That knowledge is a gnosis that is spontaneously present in such a moment.

We must be careful of our languaging. We tend to say... when we are in the Natural State. Who is the we that is in the Natural State? As though there is a second entity who can experience the Natural State sometimes and then fall away from it. There is no second entity. The Natural State experiences itself as It is or it experiences its display as projected subject or object, but at all times the only true subject is the Natural State as Subject in all situations. It is either wearing the mask of ego or not. Mask on, mask off, the Subject remains unchanged. By removing the mask of ego, the subject is not any different than while wearing the mask of ego. This is a huge point to grasp. There is no other entity separate from the Natural State itself, that we are, that then tries to become the Natural State through practice and method. The mask can never become the Subject who is wearing the mask. The mask just becomes transparent and then is realized to be the clarity and energy of the Subject itself in the form of the mask. So called Awakening is seeing or knowing this suddenly. Like a bolt of lighting in a darkened sky.

Namaste

yajvan
20 June 2008, 04:43 PM
Hari Om
~~~~~

Hi yajvan,
I also find Laksmanjoo's presentation of maya to be sublime and accurate. This struck me when I read his Secret Supreme and has stayed with me since. I am discussing a similar subject with a teacher on a Dzogchen list, who posted this response to a question of mine. I present it here for your consideration , as I feel it is an excellent piece and quite relevant:
Namaste

Namaste srivijaya,
Thank you for the post... the words are a bit different but the meaning is the same. When one talks of the pure awareness it is easy to spot. Then one feels at home no matter who talks of it.

There is more commonality we can share then differences when one wishes to talk about the fullness of Being and awareness. Please share more as you see fit.

I am also seeing another common principle that is written by Abhinavagupta and also found in the Yoga sūtras (Yogadarśana).

There is the principle of bhāvanā¹. This is called out as having the same components of saṁyama¹ i.e. dhyāna, samādhi and dhāraṇā.


Why do I bother mentioning this? Because of the end state Abhinavagupta offers as kaulika-siddhidam - that which brings about liberation in life in the form of unification with Divine Consciousness.

Another name for this unification is vaśitva or mastery of one's self , self-command , and freedom of will , being one's own master - described as unity-consciousness. We have been calling this state anuttara¹ in the various posts as of late. This may be also called Brahman Consciousness or brahmi chetana by some.


Please feel free to extend the conversation...as the notion of the post-string has been sameness sāma or samasta, that which is compounded, pervading the whole.


pranams



words and references

bhāvanā भावना - reflection , contemplation ; finding by combination or compositio ; saturating any powder with fluid , steeping , infusion
saṁyama संयम holding together; for a review of this principle please consider these HDF Posts: http://www.hindudharmaforums.com/showpost.php?p=19591&postcount=5 (http://www.hindudharmaforums.com/showpost.php?p=19591&postcount=5)
http://www.hindudharmaforums.com/showthread.php?t=2507&highlight=samyama (http://www.hindudharmaforums.com/showthread.php?t=2507&highlight=samyama)
http://www.hindudharmaforums.com/showthread.php?t=909&highlight=samyama (http://www.hindudharmaforums.com/showthread.php?t=909&highlight=samyama)
anuttara अनुत्तर - chief , principal; yet it is that which is unsurpassable; Abhinavaguputa says IT ( this state of Being) is the experient all and there is no other that can make IT his/her object of experience.

yajvan
22 June 2008, 12:23 PM
Hari Om
~~~~~


This word, sound, mantra aham is of great interest. Some call this parā vāk the Supreme Word or Sound. This parā vāk is also identified as 'She' or Śrī Devī. More on Śrī Devī and this Aham in an additional follow-up post.

Namaste

I thought to add a few more ideas to appreciate the qualities of Śrī Devī. I am always uplifted by writing about her.

We know Śrī Devī as Śakti. She is also known as anugrahātmikā of Grace incarnate.
We know Her as devatā -> divinity -> Devī. Yet we know this Devī is root in div¹, yes? And when people think of div the notion of to shine , to be bright is brought to mind. Yet this div also means to play , sport.

It is said she sports with creative delight of her own consciousness; She is creating, manifesting. But who is doing this Śrī Devī or Śiva? There is no difference. There is no difference between Śiva and His energy, śakti. Just as there is no difference being a flame and its light, yet we talk of two.

We also know many are devoted to her, the root div also means to praise , rejoice and adore. She therefore is called Devī for those that praise and adore her.

She has access to everything and to everyplace. There is no place She/He is not. Śiva-Śrī Devī cannot be escaped from, slipped by, or taken holiday from. For even when you hide, you are still hiding in the arms of Śiva-Śrī Dev. So this div also means to go or to have access to. This div is also to spread and increase. She is there even before you arrive because of this quality of all pervasiveness and expansion.

So in this one word of div we see this sport and play, to overcome or surpass all ( called vijigiṣā), She is light, movement and adoration. It is though Śiva's śakti or Śrī Devī that He expresses and enters into creation.

It is also said, Śaivī mukhaṃ Ihocyate - Śhakti ( Śrī Devī) is the entrance door ( mukhaṃ or mouth, opening ) to Śiva. This is said in Vijñāna Bhairava , the 20th and 21st kārikā, Śiva is known through Śakti.


pranams



words

mukha मुख - the mouth , opening aperture , entrance into or egress out of ; the mouth or spout of a vessel
div दिव् - to play , sport , joke , trifle with; to shine , be bright ; to praise , rejoice ; to go ; spread , increase

yajvan
27 June 2008, 03:30 PM
Hari Om
~~~~~

Namaste,

There is a most interesting conversation in the 3rd chapter of the Spanda-kārikās. Kārikā 8 points-out this principle that the Mind is the slayer of the Real. When the slayer ( the mind) is slain, what remains ? The Real.

Now what is Real or what remains is ātmanya¹. Kṣemarāja says, svātmani or ones imperishable Self. The 8th kārikā uses an interesting metaphor (we can also call this saṃketa, symbol, or hint). It calls out a plunderer, who steals away the wealth of the highest consciousness and brings about poverty in the form of limitation ( for me, this limitation is the Infinite experienced in fractions and not as a whole, as fullness of Being). What is left ? That of glāni or a depressed state.

The sutra says this glāni proceeds from ignorance. Yet if that ignorance is taken away , torn off (vilupta) by unmeṣa how can that glāni remain?


So the key here is to understand the connection to unmeṣa. This is where the wisdom of the commentator, Kṣemarāja, brings the greatest value in adding his insights to these key words and phrases.

I will take this up with the next post and (do my best to) sew the 8th kārikā just reviewed with the 9th kārikā where unmeṣa is taken up; it is a bit more esoteric and requires some 'run way' to explain.


Yet when done this all connects back to aham, अहम् I , the very first post of this thread.

pranams


words used

ātmanya आत्मन्य - being connected to ones own Self.
glāni ग्लानि - depression of mind, exhaustion , fatigue of the body , lassitude , languor, debility
vilupta विलुप्त - torn or broken off , carried away impaired , destroyed , ruined ; Interesting to note that this word is also at the core of the word plunderer or viluṇṭhikā.
unmeṣa उन्मेष - the act of opening the eyes ; coming forth , becoming visible , appearing
saṃketa संकेत ( some write saṇketa) - intimation, hint, allusion , preconcerted sign or signal or gesture

yajvan
28 June 2008, 12:30 PM
Hari Om
~~~~~

Namaste

Note to the reader… To explain this part of the 9th kārikā requires more definition. For some, you many find yourself a bit unsure of the information or concepts provided, that is fine, as this conversation is a bit more advanced. It will be good to read the last post above on this subject to get a 'running start'. At times you may find parts to be more esoteric for some, and comfortable reading to others.

In the last post a key idea was that of glāni or depression of mind. Ramākaṇtha¹, another commenter on the Spandakārikā-s suggests this glāni is due to sahajānanda hānirūpa. Now what is that? It is sahaj + ānanda + hāni + rūpa; The person's form or composition (rūpa), has the natural disposition (sahaj) of pure happiness (ānanda); this has been been laid aside (hāni). Or has laid aside or forgotten ones natural happiness, and this is glāni.

This glāni disappears with unmeṣa - the act of opening the eyes. Since we know we are working with hints and symbols (saṃketa) on this, it is important to understand this idea of unmeṣa, which will help unwrap the 9th kārikā.

This unmeṣa is also considered expansion. For the record it is the opposite of nimeṣa or absorption. This unmeṣa & nimeṣa is considered a way of expressing Śiva's creative power which is considered spanda-śakti. It is by this spanda-śakti that creation expands and contracts.
This unmeṣa & nimeṣa as One, also displays itSELF multiple ways:

expansion & contraction
opening & closing
rest & activity
display & suppression
appearance & disappearance
revealing & concealing
emerging & submerging
manifesting and absorbing
maintenance & concealment , etc. etc.Hence it is Śiva's śakti (we call Śrī Devī) that brings about the creation and expansion, also the dissolution of the Universe. But just as I listed some of the qualities, these emerge within the Unity of Śiva's nature, of wholeness, expressing diversity of creation at the same time.
All this occurs within Śiva and not outside of Him. Hence this Unity is always there, yet to us we see and experience diversity. It is the intent of Sanatana Dharma to regain this vision of Unity.

The qualities mentioned above are also found in ourselves. Our thoughts and our bodies, emotions, etc. We are in part and whole, an extension of this Creation, therefore we can experience these qualities of diversity ( as we do now) and Unity , which needs to be re-recognized, it's there.

Now lets go to the 9th kārikā , it says ,
That should be known as unmeṣa when the rise of another thought (in the native) takes place in the mind who is already engaged in one thought, one should experience it (introspectively) for oneself.

So what is the gem or meaning here? When the mind of the native that is to quit or retire one thought/idea and it is restrained, lets use another word to convey this restrained, nirodha. This nirodha means held back, withheld, held fast , stopped and is about equal to restrained, but also should convey without force. When this occurs, that is before going to another thought , the location of the mind then is in the middle position madhya, this is the key point.
This state of being in the middle (we have called the gap¹ on many occasions) allows this pure Consciousness, aham, to be experienced to shine through.
This is also confirmed in the 62nd kārikā of Vijñāna Bhairava. In fact this is where nirodha is called out as an established thought - niruddha cit.

So yajvan, why then did you bring up all this regarding unmeṣa? Well, this transcendental awareness of pure Consciousness arises (unfolds, displays, manifests i.e. unmeṣa) from spanda¹. It is where there is no difference between object and subject. All of the thoughts of the mind are arrested, niruddha, one is found in the middle or madhya.
Since this unmeṣa cannot be grasped like an object, as 'this thing' one has to approach it in a very delicate way to experience it. The awareness is free from effort e.g. ones intent cannot therefore be , I will go experience and capture this unmeṣa and inspect it; I will inspect this pure Consciousness. This aham, pure consciousness has to be experienced in a very innocent and delicate way.


Recall in the beginning glāni disappears with unmeṣa. It is with madhya that this experience takes place. Because if you are centered, you are not going to another thought or another object/idea. The mind is alert and fresh, awake yet absorbed, the proper condition to innocently experience this aham, this pure Consciousness.
But why? In this innocent state unmeṣa expands Pure Consciousness, it serves it up. The kārikā calls it aparodaya - the rise of another awareness¹. And what is that the rise or unmeṣa, of another awareness? -> Pure Consciousness.

The key is the fixity of mind, being able to establish madhya with techniques or dhāranā. Much is to be said for absorption (fixity). This assists and helps establish niruddha. This can be done by various upāya-s (or means) for reaching the upeya or aim.

With this process offered in the Spandakārikā and in the of Vijñāna Bhairava one may experience this - with skillful means, with innocence.
What questions then are answered?
In whom does this awareness rise? In the aspirant who is absorbed.
But what kind of thought is needed? A thought or object in which all fluctuations of the mind are stilled; dharana or upāya is the means to create this absorbed condition.
And what arises? Pure Consciousness, SELF, aham.
And where does this arise from? From spanda , the principle of the SELF, aware of itSELF
And how does this rise ? Unmeṣa.
And what then is retired ? Glāni.

We have now broken the code of the following:
Mind is the slayer of the Real. When the slayer (the mind) is slain, what remains ? The Real.


pranams


Words and references

glāni ग्लानि - depression of mind, exhaustion , fatigue of the body , lassitude , languor, debility
Ramākaṇtha wrote a commentary called Vivṛti which I have not read. His works are also pointed out in this edition of
the the Spanda-kārikā-s by Jaideva Singh to throw additional light on the subject.
sahajānanda = sahaj सहज - natural state or disposition ; born or produced together or at the same time; born or produced together or at the same time + ānanda आनन्द= pure happiness , some call bliss + hānirūpa = hāni हानि abandonment , relinquishment ;taking off , laying aside + rūpa रूप = in the form of ; likeness , image , reflection
unmeṣa उन्मेष - the act of opening the eyes ; coming forth , becoming visible , appearing
saṃketa संकेत (some write saṇketa) - intimation, hint, allusion , preconcerted sign or signal or gesture
spanda स्पन्द - throbbing , throb , quiver , pulse , tremor , vibration , motion , activity ;This spanda is considered the slight movement within Consciousness of the Absloute , a throb. This throb for us can be considered Self-Referral, that this Absolute, is aware of itSELF, hence the motion of spanda is due to this being Aware of ItSELF.
madhya मध्य - middlemost , intermediate , central ; Also see HDF Posts on gap:
http://www.hindudharmaforums.com/showthread.php?t=2996&highlight=madhya (http://www.hindudharmaforums.com/showthread.php?t=2996&highlight=madhya)
http://www.hindudharmaforums.com/showthread.php?t=2337&highlight=madhya (http://www.hindudharmaforums.com/showthread.php?t=2337&highlight=madhya)
http://www.hindudharmaforums.com/showpost.php?p=18446&postcount=5 (http://www.hindudharmaforums.com/showpost.php?p=18446&postcount=5)
aparodaya - the rise of another awareness is offered by Kṣemarāja in his commentary of the 9th kārikā

yajvan
29 June 2008, 01:52 PM
Hari Om
~~~~~

Namaste,
This is a continuation of post 13 and 14 from above.


What is the gem or meaning here? When the mind of the native that is to quit or retire one thought/idea and it is restrained, lets use another word to convey this restrained,nirodha . This nirodha means held back, withheld, held fast , stopped and is about equal to restrained, but also should convey without force. When this occurs, that is before going to another thought , the location of the mind then is in the middle position madhya, this is the key point.
This state of being in the middle (we have called the gap¹ on many occasions) allows this pure Consciousness, aham, to be experienced to shine through.
This is also confirmed in the 62nd kārikā of Vijñāna Bhairava. In fact this is where nirodha is called out as an established thought - nirodha cit.


So now the question, can we find other points of reference for the knowledge we reviewed? One may want to look to Patañjali’s Yogadarśana. We need not go too far into his works. Samādhi Pada ( chapt 1): sutra 1. 2 yogash citta-vrtti-nirodha

vrtti: A modification, patterned spinning, bias, recurring thought patterns; machinations, wave form vacillations, processing, fluctuations, unstable condition, bias, or your basic whirling of the mind thought, all that.
citta: mind-field: Field of consciousness.
nirodha: cessation, cancellation, dissolution, stillness, restraint
citta + vrtti: taken as a whole is the the wavering, vacillations, agitations, within the field of consciousness.
yogash occurs when citta + vrtti is nirodha (stilled).
The mind or ego identifies with the whirlings that continue day-in-day-out i.e. a state of mind where the observer identifies with these permutations of the mind. Patañjali informs us this ceases or yogash occurs when citta + vrtti is nirodha.

That is, yoga is there already, we need to just remove the 'noise level'. Just like a room filled with children playing, jumping, etc. We remove the children and the room is back to its state of silence...

So what is this state of yoga योग then... this yoking, connection, junction, union? It is being possessed of the SELF, of ātman, aham.

Some Observations
We have talked many times on HDF that Reality is omnipresent. The Upanishads say that SELF is is present everywhere and fills us up to our nail-ends ( finger nails). Yet when viewed partially it is seen as incomplete. That is, the view of the Ultimate (anuttara) is hindered by one's awareness that is caught up in finite objects.

There is so many things that this mind can be entertained with, that it goes from object-to-object, thought-to-thought, emotion-to-emotion, as a bee visits as flowers flying from one to another unceaselessly (vrtti).

Yet the Spandakārikā-s , Vijñāna Bhairava, Patañjali’s Yogadarśana, and many more inform us we can experience this Reality, this pure consciousness within ourselves if we set up the conditions for this to occur. And that occurrence is the gap (saṃdhyā¹), the in-between, thoughts, objects, emotions and the like.
The condition is just recognizing this pure consciousness and experiencing it. That between all the activity of doing, there is the underlying non-doing, unchanging (nirvikalpa¹) level of Being, this pure consciousness which is the basis for all other levels of awareness we entertain, use and exercise.

For those that experience this pure consciousness, it is not something one has to toil and dig for - just allowing it to occur in a very innocent and natural way and in time it unfolds more and more. We have chosen to call these 'ways' upāya-s, yet they are techniques and can go by other names from other schools.


Truly there is in this world nothing so purifying as knowledge; He who is perfected in Yoga, of himself in time finds this within himself. Bhāgavad gītā, Chapt 4, 38th śloka.

pranams

words

nirodha निरोध -restraint , check , control , suppression , destruction ;cessation, cancellation, null, dissolution, stillness, emptiness, or extinguished
nirvikalpa निर्विकल्प - free from change or differences ; not wavering
saṃdhyā संध्या - junction , juncture; holding together , union

yajvan
03 July 2008, 09:27 PM
Hari Om
~~~~~

Namaste,


She has access to everything and to everyplace. There is no place She/He is not. Śiva-Śrī Devī cannot be escaped from, slipped by, or taken holiday from. For even when you hide, you are still hiding in the arms of Śiva-Śrī Dev. So this div also means to go or to have access to. This div is also to spread and increase. She is there even before you arrive because of this quality of all pervasiveness and expansion.

This idea/reality mentioned above is very interesting. Abhinavagupta extends this idea by saying the following:
Khe brahmaṇi abhedarūpe sthitvā carati iti khecarī
It says, khecarī is that which, while stationed in brahman (brahmaṇi) in indistinguishable Unity, moves about.

This moving about is of great interest to me. Stationed in the unmovable, it moves. I find this quite awakening to one studying
this knowledge - let me offer why I think this.

Abhinavagupta spends some time on this concept of khecarī¹. It is interesting to note the roots of this word . We have khe + carī - moving in the air. This khe is rooted or associated with kha¹. Kha is a bija sound for Brahman, and also is defined as vacuity ,space, ether some like to call it sky. That is why its associated with Brahman, as ākāśa. This ākāśa or space is that which holds and envelops everything and is a nice adjunct to one component of Brahman.
We have talked much about this ākāśa on many HDF Posts (my favorite no less). You will see how it fits into this conversation as we take a look at this knowledge.
Note we see kha then in ākāśa and Brahman which holds everything, nothing is outside of it. And carī¹ or cara is moving, or going - so that which moves is carī.

Why is this of value? Because the very first verse of Parā-trīśikā Vivaraṇa, Śrī Devī asks how can one achieve sameness (samatā) with Śiva or kaulika-siddhi - an achievement (or success) that occurs while/within this human body, khecarī-samatāṃ vrajet - acquire the same unconditioned Consciousness of the Divine (Śiva) . A most profound question.

This is the state of khecarī-samatā - that sameness with aham, 'I'. This khecarī is the movement , śakti (Śrī Devī) moving in kha ( Brahman).
So we as humans can know two states - that of the pasū - the bound individual, and that of the mukti¹ , one liberated. This goes buy two names:

Khecarī vaiṣamya¹ - the movement , śakti, in vaiṣamya or singleness, uneven-ness
Khecarī samatā ( some write sāmya) - the movement , śakti, in samenessThis lays the foundation to go a bit deeper for the next post.

ॐनमःिशवाय

pranams

words used

This knowledge is found in the Parā-trīśikā Vivaraṇa.
khecarī खेचरी - the power of flying though space; some call this one of the siddhi-s.yet one needs to look to its components:
kha ख is the locative cas of khe. Kha is space , ether , sky yet considered the Supreme Brahman; It is also a cavity , hollow , cave , cavern , aperture + carī or cara चर - moving, going , walking , wandering. (I can see how the english 'car' for auto has come about from this word cara, moving or going); carita चरित gone , gone to; moving, going, motion
vaiṣamya वैषम्य unevenness, solitariness , singleness
bodha बोध - knowing, understanding; waking or becoming awake; perception , apprehension, thought, knowledge , understanding , intelligence
mukti मुक्ति - final liberation or emancipation ; setting or becoming free , release , liberation , deliverance; some even call this a discharge of debt... the debt of ignorance

yajvan
05 July 2008, 01:02 PM
Hari Om
~~~~~

Namaste



This is the state of khecarī-samatā - that sameness with aham, 'I'. This khecarī is the movement , śakti (Śrī Devī) moving in kha ( Brahman).
So we as humans can know two states - that of the pasū - the bound individual, and that of the mukti¹ , one liberated. This goes buy two names:

Khecarī vaiṣamya¹ - the movement , śakti, in vaiṣamya or singleness, uneven-ness
Khecarī samatā ( some write sāmya) - the movement , śakti, in sameness
This khecarī vaiṣamya mentioned in the last post suggests and points to singleness, that of the individual within the duality and multiplicity of life - IMO 99.9% of the world's population experiences this.

Experiences of the individual i.e. perception, actions, even kāma and krodha ( passions and wrath) are experienced 'single' or disparate, completelt seperate from the whole. This vaiṣamya is due to ones ignorance, this mala or blemish, not knowing the naure of anuttara (the Supreme) - as which we have discussed many times in this section and in others. What is the result? Limitation of experince, seperateness.
Yet with this experience of anuttara¹, the experince becomes khecarī samatā - the movement in sameness, within anuttara. We do not associate (then) with limitations.
Abhinavagagupa suggests even if kāma and krodha arise within this state thy appear as the nature of the the Divine ( Univeral or Bhairava Consciousness). With khecarī samatā, the individual ( no longer that, individual) experiences the Divine everywhere, the movement (khecarī) within the Divine.

This is the blessing the comes from ones sādhana - saṃhāra¹ with the Divine arises.

ॐनमःिशवाय

pranams

words used

This knowledge is found in the Parā-trīśikā Vivaraṇa.
khecarī खेचरी - the power of flying though space; some call this one of the siddhi-s.yet one needs to look to its components:
kha ख is the locative cas of khe. Kha is space , ether , sky yet considered the Supreme Brahman; It is also a cavity , hollow , cave , cavern , aperture + carī or cara चर - moving, going , walking , wandering. (I can see how the english 'car' for auto has come about from this word cara, moving or going); carita चरित gone , gone to; moving, going, motion
vaiṣamya वैषम्य unevenness, solitariness , singleness
anuttara अनुत्तर - chief , principal; yet it is that which is unsurpassable; Abhinavaguputa says IT ( this state of Being) is the experient all and there is no other that can make IT his/her object of experience
saṃhāra¹ संहार - bringing together , collection , accumulation; contraction; drawing in pratiprasavaप्रतिप्रसव - return to the original state ; counter-order , suspension of a general prohibition in a particular case ; an HDF post on this subject: http://www.hindudharmaforums.com/showthread.php?t=1462&highlight=Patanjali (http://www.hindudharmaforums.com/showthread.php?t=1462&highlight=Patanjali)