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reflections
28 October 2008, 12:36 PM
Namaste,

What is the position of Shaivism on Bhagvad Gita?
Is it considered valid scripture or neutral views?

Jai Shri Krishna.

Eastern Mind
28 October 2008, 03:30 PM
Reflections: I am guessing it will depend completely on who you ask. This topic was discussed here to some degree before. If you search, you will see what I mean. Personally, I hold that the Gita, strictly speaking is not a Saiva scripture, but when I put that idea forth before. I sort of got scolded, meaning I would be in the minority. I liken it similarly to festivals. Thai Pusam may be dear to my heart, but most North Indians won't have even heard of it. There are many primary and secondary scriptures within the sects/divisions of Hinduism. So let me ask: why are you asking this question?
Aum namasivaya

reflections
29 October 2008, 05:39 AM
Namaste Eastern Mind,
Thanks a lot for reply.

I just had a discussion with a Shaivite person. He told me that, Gita is a Smriti scripture, which is true. And one of the most known Hindu scripture to the western world is Gita. That should be replacved by Veda/Upanishad, as Upanishads are shruti scripture and all Hindus accept their authority.

I hold thiru- kural in very high respects. I may not be familiar with some other Shaivite scriptures, however I will have no issues in accepting them as valid scriptures and accepting it as source of inspiration for some one else.

I did not ask to create any controversy. I just thought there are knowlegable people on this forum so it is worth asking them.

Arjuna
30 November 2008, 07:47 AM
Namaste,
What is the position of Shaivism on Bhagvad Gita?
Is it considered valid scripture or neutral views?

It is accepted as a part of general Hindu smriti and of Vedanta canon.

However in Kashmir Tantric Shaivism Gita is seen as a part of Krama heritage, that is, essentially Shaiva/Shakta text. There is a Tantric commentary on Gita Gitartha-sangraha by Sri Abhinavagupta (published in Sanskrit and English).

yajvan
01 December 2008, 11:04 AM
hariḥ oṁ
~~~~~~

Namaste

Arjuna writes


It is accepted as a part of general Hindu smriti and of Vedanta canon.

For those new to this word smṛti … there is this smṛti and there is śruti :

smṛti स्मृति is remembrance , reminiscence , thinking of or upon, calling to mind i.e. the whole body of sacred tradition or what is remembered by human (embodied) teachers. What fits into smṛti? The Vedāṅgas ( limbs of the Veda), Law books or Dharmasāstra-s, the epics or Ithihāsa-s and Purāṇa-s.
Hence the Bhāgavad gītā is part of the Mahābhārata, a Ithihāsa ( some write Itihāsa ). This Itihāsa is iti + ha + āsa = 'so it was' .

And what of this śruti श्रुति ? It's that which is heard or perceived . My teacher always used the word cognized. This is considered the Divine Word which is heard, seen, cognized by and within the consciousness of the ṛṣi-s ; we think of the Veda-s as the repository of this wisdom.

pranams