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Lailaphetes
20 October 2009, 09:04 AM
Hi everyone. It's finally good to be part of a Hindu forum again. I've been interested in Hinduism for at least a year now, particularly in the Gaudiya Vaisnava sect(not really ISKCON though). I don't know what it is, but I feel that I am only attracted to Sri Krsna. I love the fact of God as a playful child!

But at the same time I feel torn. I really want to be Hindu, but I want to remain Roman Catholic as well. I feel as if Christianity(well, at least the RC portion) is so similar to Gaudiya Vaisnavaism in some way, like in the teachings and such. I don't feel like I can just be one or other. I'm hoping that this isn't some "New Age" thing I'm getting into. I can't help it...I love both Gaudiya Vaisnavism(KRSNA!) and RC(Jesus and the saints). Perhaps this makes me very hypocritical. I'm not sure.

I became interested in Hinduism through Swami Prabhupada's Bhagavad Gita As It Is. Or actually sometime before that I bought a picture of Sri Krsna because I felt attracted to Him. I disagree with some of Prabhupada's commentary however, so I don't think ISKCON is for me. I am more interested in Narayana Maharaja's(I believe that's his name) GV books so I'm hoping to get a hold of those in the future. That being said, I still read both Prabhupada's and Narayana's books.

So please bear with me if I have a lot of questions. I hope to see everyone soon. Thanks.

Onkara
20 October 2009, 10:24 AM
Hi Lailaphetes
Welcome to the forum, I am looking forward to reading your posts.

I can understand and sympathise with your feelings. After being close to one religion it is difficult emotionally to turn away and focus on another albeit attractive. Having had a similar dilemma I think it can be summed up as “God works in mysterious ways” as no sooner do we start to feel we that know ourselves then something new and unexpected happens. It is because we are growing and changing; all part of the fun of living.

Some people may suggest we abandon one religion in favour of another to ensure we don’t waver on the path. That is helpful advice and can be a decisive factor however there is no real way to wipe the slate clean. What we bring with us from other religions and culture is best seen as a way of enriching our new path rather than something which needs to be discarded or pushed aside by a sense of guilt. Give it a go and see how it feels, was my advice to myself.

You may find the concept of bhavas useful. It appears there are various ways of understanding our relationship with God, for example Vatsalya Bhava. Here is the link to one site (http://hindu-practice.suite101.com/article.cfm/the_five_bhavas) about bhavas.

I would be interested in your progression and any conclusions you make.

Lailaphetes
20 October 2009, 10:59 AM
Thanks Snip. I just feel bad because I literally came back to the RCC about a month ago. I came back to the religion after being an agnostic. I just felt like agnosticism was not for me. How could I go on assuming that there is nothing essentially? It just seems rather boring and purposeless. That sounds more like nihilism, not so much agnosticism.

I don't really consider myself a Hindu...yet. What makes a Hindu? The fact that I want to be Hindu makes me Hindu? Rather than saying Hindu though, I think I should be asking, what makes me a Gaudiya Vaisnava? Or maybe I do consider myself GV and RC. I think the problem with me trying to find out whether I'm GV or not is, not the fact that I want to be RC/GV at the same time, but that fact that Hinduism is as vast as Christianity in terms of all the multitudes of different "denominations", belief systems, etc. Every Hindu I have ever talked with never has the same beliefs as the last Hindu. Maybe I'm wrong here. Feel free to disagree.

I'm kind of confused as to what "waver from the path" means. Do you mean just waver from religion(ie belief in God) in general, or from a specific path(which, in my case, would be GV)? I honestly feel that I can't be one or the other, but rather a combination of both. Hopefully that doesn't confuse anyone.

grames
20 October 2009, 12:15 PM
What do you want to know? Let me see if i can help :)

sunyata07
20 October 2009, 02:00 PM
Hello Lailaphetes,

Welcome to HDF; it's great having you here. I am always particularly interested in hearing about people coming from a Christian background like myself.

You are most definitely not alone in your feelings. I was (and in some ways still am) a Catholic for virtually all of my life, and with my strong ties to my family I am still influenced quite a bit by its philosophy and the customs of Christmas, Easter. I will attend Mass sometimes with my family, although usually for the "special" occasions like the holidays and remembrance Masses for my deceased grandparents (both who were very strong in their Catholic beliefs). Although my feelings are more to do with doubt on successfully integrating my new religious beliefs into my life, I completely understand and share your sense of being "torn".

Good question on what makes a Hindu. Different people will tell you different things, depending on their perspective. Some people will tell you you have to be born Hindu. Others differ on that and say you can very easily convert. I even remember hearing someone's opinion that Hinduism does not differ between the person and the religion and therefore you are a Hindu the moment you realise it for yourself when you follow the rules of Dharma and understand the basic tenets. The religion is a way of life, it is not based on a dogma of set rules everyone must follow. It probably provides the most liberty of any official "religion" in the world. You're right about no two Hindus ever hold the same beliefs, at least, not on certain, specific philosophies. The basic elements and essential beliefs still hold for everyone.

With that said, I don't think it is hypocritical to hold Gaudiya Vaishnava beliefs, pray to Sri Krishna-Radha or Sri Caitanya but to still pay respects and pray to Jesus Christ or Our Lady or any of the saints you're used to growing up with. I don't think that is hypocritical at all. It's been an issue of strong controversy for some years (especially considering Christianity's tendency to incorporate other religious figures into its fold and claim it is still Christian) but people in the past have actually identified Christ with Krishna. One does not necessarily have to adopt this mode of thinking, but it could be a way for you to reconcile any ideas of the "separateness" or "conflict" between your two beliefs.

Lailaphetes
20 October 2009, 04:32 PM
Grames: Well, I'm not really sure. Out of curiosity, how many "white"(maybe I should say non-Indian), western converts are here on this website (considering I am one of them lol)? There seem to be many here, but I do not personally know of any in real life. Is it necessary to visit a temple or to build a shrine? I would really like to build a shrine, nothing elaborate, but I don't have any personal space where I live.

Sunyata07: Thank you. :) I attend mass at a RC church usually every week, but never go to any Hindu temple for worship(it's called puja right? My brain is fried). I know that Diwali(not sure if that's the proper spelling) wasn't too long ago and that there was a Diwali celebration at my library. Anyone was welcome to attend. I feel kind of bad that I did not go.

Onkara
21 October 2009, 03:41 AM
Hi Lailaphestes

I just feel bad because I literally came back to the RCC about a month ago.


Guilt is a false master it demands our attention and results in wasting our energy whilst we try to find a way to appease two opposites. There is no benefit in feeling bad. The fact that one feels bad does not imply one is making a mistake. If the sense of feeling bad arises it implies that we have acted contrary to our image of ourselves. For example, I once thought I was the type of person who never gives up. I thought I should not give up my hobbies or clubs after I started, so I went every week against my will. Then I realised that it is not stubbornness which would help me but that growth comes from accepting change and progress in my life. I tried new things, perhaps for a short period and if I found it was not for me then I moved on. I recognised that there was a valuable lesson learnt just from going in the first place. From the act of trying alone I find I know my personality better. I apologise for labouring the point, but once any sense of regret, guilt or remorse is removed we can face the challenge with a positive mind and really start to benefit.


I came back to the religion after being an agnostic. I just felt like agnosticism was not for me. How could I go on assuming that there is nothing essentially? It just seems rather boring and purposeless. That sounds more like nihilism, not so much agnosticism.

The fact that we can see the fruitlessness of agnosticism and the slippery slope towards Nihilism is significant enough to look further for a reason for this life. Fundamentally there must be something, right? There must be some reason for life. For me the answer came in Hindu philosophy. Vedanta, offers a much better explanation in my eyes to agnosticism. Brahman in Advaita Vedanta is sat-chit-ananda. There is no way that there can be nothing (nihilism) and the commentaries of Sri Shankaracharya help to satisfy my need for logic.


I don't really consider myself a Hindu...yet. What makes a Hindu? The fact that I want to be Hindu makes me Hindu? Rather than saying Hindu though, I think I should be asking, what makes me a Gaudiya Vaisnava? Or maybe I do consider myself GV and RC. I think the problem with me trying to find out whether I'm GV or not is, not the fact that I want to be RC/GV at the same time, but that fact that Hinduism is as vast as Christianity in terms of all the multitudes of different "denominations", belief systems, etc. Every Hindu I have ever talked with never has the same beliefs as the last Hindu. Maybe I'm wrong here. Feel free to disagree.

The topic of being a hindu is addressed and answered well by Sunyata07. I personally would embrace all good teachings until a stronger sense of direction comes to you, be it GV, RC, Vedanta, Sikhism or something else.

Similar to you I am not from an Indian background. I have not followed any devotional worship (bhakti yoga), so cannot comment on GV or RC in depth. I am aware that not one religion or path suits all, so what helps me may not help another but I feel inclined to offer anything I can. I did not choose my religion, it appealed to me as it provided new answers to old questions. Perhaps others see a similarity in their path which they would like to share.



I'm kind of confused as to what "waver from the path" means. Do you mean just waver from religion(ie belief in God) in general, or from a specific path(which, in my case, would be GV)? I honestly feel that I can't be one or the other, but rather a combination of both. Hopefully that doesn't confuse anyone.

Sorry, I think my use of the word “waver” left it open to wide interpretation. What I mean is that I see each religion as a spiritual path which can lead to a goal. The methods and ideas on that path are usually derived from those who have arrived at the goal themselves and they have then past down this knowledge and teaching. (Quite often some ideas and terms are now out of date.) So the “quickest” and most direct route to the goal is to take on one religion and continue to question what we don’t understand or don’t like until we see why those ideas exist in that religion, IMHO. One could argue that the goal of all religions is to find God, be at peace with life or simply love God. It is a spiritual path.

I am not suggesting that embracing two or more religions is wrong. But it does mean that you (or me) would have to try to understand a lot more in doing so to reach our goal. If a goal is what we want.

There is no hard or fast way. Some people have found enlightenment and peace with little or no difficulty, others report years of study and devotion (bhakti).

grames
21 October 2009, 11:53 AM
Namaste,

Does skin color or race matters when it comes to spiritual quest? I don't think so. Also, i am not sure if anyone keeps count of who is white and who is not in this forum so i won't be able to produce any numbers for that.

For the question... is it necessary to visit a temple or build a shrine... i will give you an analogy. For example, you may know a lot about Mr Obama, The President and you may be very pleased with his charecter, charisma and dedication etc. It will be so pleasing for you if he falls in line with your expectations isint? Now,

How about you having a chance to invite him to your house? How pleasurable his presence will be at your own premises? Won't it be very delightful for you?

That is the idea of having an 'altar' in your very own house where you invite the Lord and keep His presence in your very own house. Seeing Him in the altar in your very own house will keep you reminding of His presence everyday and help you to know Him more personally as well as intimately.

Does it makes sense? If "Yes", do not wait to have one at your house.

Hari Bol!


Grames: Well, I'm not really sure. Out of curiosity, how many "white"(maybe I should say non-Indian), western converts are here on this website (considering I am one of them lol)? There seem to be many here, but I do not personally know of any in real life. Is it necessary to visit a temple or to build a shrine? I would really like to build a shrine, nothing elaborate, but I don't have any personal space where I live.

Sunyata07: Thank you. :) I attend mass at a RC church usually every week, but never go to any Hindu temple for worship(it's called puja right? My brain is fried). I know that Diwali(not sure if that's the proper spelling) wasn't too long ago and that there was a Diwali celebration at my library. Anyone was welcome to attend. I feel kind of bad that I did not go.

Lailaphetes
21 October 2009, 01:17 PM
Snip: I suppose you're right that I should not be feeling guilty for anything, but rather "just move on" so to speak. I think I'll just continue doing what I typically do. With regards to agnosticism/nihilism, they seem to be growing in terms of population. I have tons of friends who are agnostic/nihilist. In the past, it was usually the opposite; I had tons of Christian friends yet no atheistic(or irreligious) ones. I am disappointed with all kinds of Christians, Hindus, Muslims, etc. claiming that scientists are atheistic, evil, false, etc.(I know that this line of thought runs through ultra conservative Christians and among a lot of ISKCONites). I feel like this is an insult to me, a religious person and future scientist(geology major). But of course, I can't let that get to me can I?

Grames: I was merely asking about western converts because I can only wonder how they are treated in India(I'm not too educated on this subject). I remember listening to one story about an American woman who married an Indian, and decided to convert to Hinduism. Basically when she went to visit family in India with her husband, she wasn't even allowed in some of the temples she visited, despite the fact she was Hindu and wearing the traditional dress(saris). I know for the most part, this is not the case. Making a shrine does make sense though, but it's just trying to find the space for one. On top of that, I have no idea what Gaudiya Vaisnavas put on their shrines, considering it varies within that group.

sunyata07
21 October 2009, 02:30 PM
Lailaphetes,

You are indeed a rare individual to have that balance of religious fervour and yet go searching for scientific discovery and truth! :) I'm a science student too, so again, I understand what you mean by people tending to "side" with either faith or fact. To be honest I have never understood why people have created this huge wedge between science and religion. All my friends are usually either agnostic/atheistic scientists who only believe in what they can measure or see for themselves; or else they're the very backward-thinking religious types who think they can explain the world through miracles. *sigh* Why must life be viewed through such a black and white perspective by so many?

Snip has made a good point on guilt. Remember that it is not the same as conscientiousness, and it is largely a bad guide. Don't rely on it. It can really distort one's perception of reality.

With regards to setting up a shrine at home, I think Grames has used a good analogy. Think of a shrine at home as a place for the Lord to take a seat and pay you a visit. Certainly, it's not obligatory, but it is a great way to build up your relationship with your choice of God. If you place it somewhere where you can pass by it everyday, it really does act as a reminder to yourself to keep Him in your thoughts. Yes, room space can be a difficult thing to cater for, but I have only my small box-sized bedroom and I have somehow managed to find a corner space for prayer and quiet reflection! Shrines needn't be flashy or very big. Also, with regards to knowing what to put in the shrine, I think until you become more and more acquainted with Gaudiya Vaishnavism and what their customs are, maybe you couold keep it simple but meaningful. A simple framed picture is usually what does the job for most small shrines. You needn't be too worried about what should be done and what shouldn't be done. Sanatana Dharma is much less rigid than what we have been used to in RC. Like Snip said, while it might not be advised later in life when you're bhakti grows, I don't think it's wrong to mix religions - at least not while you are still being exposed and learning about them. My shrine houses a murti of the bodhisattva of compassion, Guan-Yin, along with my main Ganesha murti. I also still keep a small figurine of Our Lady of Lourdes that I got as a present for my confirmation back when I was Catholic. I don't see any conflicts in that. If anything, these different portrayals of the divine remind me that virtues like compassion, love and mercy have no borders and cannot be contained in things like name, gender or form.

Lailaphetes
21 October 2009, 04:17 PM
Thank you Sunyata07. :) I find it odd as well that typically a person will side with only religion or only with science. Some of the greatest scientists were Christians themselves(and I'm sure there are some Hindu scientists as well that I'm not familiar with) while some weren't. While science can be used to do terrible things(bombs, weapons, war, etc.), it can also do very great things(save lives). I find it odd that these very religious types claim that science is evil and atheistic, yet they themselves are taking advantage of it EVERY DAY. lol

I think if I build a shrine it will be fairly simple. Sometimes I think of my mind as a "shrine" itself. There are many days when I cannot stop thinking about Sri Krsna. I'll even sing the "Govinda Hare, Gopala Hare" bhajan in my head, and rarely, sing it out loud(when nobody is around of course). I also have a beautiful gold foilded photo of baby Krsna framed where I can see it on my college dorm desk to remind me of God. I have japa beads as well, but have never used them. Although I disagree with many of Srila Prabhupada's teachings and commentaries, I do agree with the fact that we should be constantly thinking of God, which makes us more conscious of Him(or Her) and ourselves.

grames
22 October 2009, 03:45 AM
Hi Lailaphetes,

You already got everything you need i believe. :) Just keep all that you got with utmost cleanliness and respect and that is all required.

GV is not very different from what ISKCON is as ISKCON is having same philosophical and Spritual root as GV.

You made a statement that you do not agree with many of the translations etc of Shri Prabhupada and do you mind telling what they are?

Thanks

Lailaphetes
22 October 2009, 02:21 PM
Grames: I do not disagree with his translation of the Bhagavad Gita, but with some of his commentary of the Bhagavad Gita. I find his translation relatively easy to understand compared to some of the more "archaic" translations I have. With his commentaries for example, he says that women, shudras, etc. are "less" intelligent. Granted, I don't have my copy of Prabhupada's BG open right in front of me right now, so I can't remember what pages this commentary is on.

Prabhupada says something along the lines that women aren't intelligent and should be watched like children because they cannot be trusted. I have seen some of this in his other books as well, such as in "Krsna, the Supreme Personality of Godhead." Now I know he's just "passing" these beliefs around from the laws of Manu, so he's not making them up out of thin air. I don't have a copy of the laws of Manu, but from what people tell me, it is contradictory of itself.

He also translates the word Deva into English "demi-god." That is not a correct translation, so why did Prabhupada choose the word "demi-god" to translate as Deva? Also, I know ISKCON sees the Devas as "helpers" and not anything to be worshipped(much as the angels do in Christianity), whereas other forms of Gaudiya Vaisnavism don't seem so strict on worshipping the other Devas(Narayana Maharaja is this way I believe, though I could be wrong).

While I might acknowledge that Sri Krsna is the "Supreme Personality of Godhead," I'm not sure you can just turn around and avoid some of the other Devas. What about God's other forms? I apologize if that seemed a rather long rant. I have nothing against Srila Prabhupada. In fact, I am glad he brought Hinduism to the west and allowed it to be approachable to everyone, not just Indians. Afterall, he is following in the traditions of Caitanya Mahaprabhu in bringing God to everyone. I suppose this is why GV sticks out to me so much, because God(in this case, Sri Krsna) could care less of who we are and where we come from.

Eastern Mind
22 October 2009, 06:43 PM
Namaste Lailaphetes: Welcome to these forums. I`m one of the ˛ld white guys`amongst several younger people on here. All the talk of apostasy, excommunication you hear from people here is something I went through about 30 years ago, although for me it wasn`t technically conversion.

I`m wondering where you are physically. Perhaps there is a Hindu temple you can go to near by. Perhaps not. Actually going to a temple can help out a lot with searching. I`ve observed that there are those that are comfortable, and those that are not. Hindu souls generally feel at home.

There is a problem with mixing religion. At least from my personal point of view. That problem is mental confusion. Lets take reincarnation versus heaven and hell. Which is it for the afterlife. We Hindus, for the most part, are not interested in creating confusion in discussions. Rather we would like to see clarity.

Aum Namasivaya

Lailaphetes
22 October 2009, 09:17 PM
EasternMind: Actually, there is a temple not too far away from where I live. But it's on the worst side of town where the traffic makes it impossible to get too. I'm not sure I'd feel comfortable visiting a temple, considering I would feel like an intruder. I don't know anything about "ritual" so to speak; I know you have to be dressed a certain way, have to bathe, etc. I would feel like an outsider, and there are no "white" people that visit other than maybe for yoga classes. But actual devotees? Probably not.

I honestly don't see a problem with "mixing" religions but other people seem to. I can understand that. However, I consider hell being stuck in the material world, and the devil materialism. Purgatory I consider the constant rebirths, and heaven the place where we can be with God(I'm not sure if Hinduism uses the term "nirvana"; where all our suffering has stopped and we are with God finally). Granted, that's probably a bad way of having other people try to see it the way I do. But it's late at night and that's the best I can do at summarizing.

Eastern Mind
22 October 2009, 09:31 PM
EasternMind: Actually, there is a temple not too far away from where I live. But it's on the worst side of town where the traffic makes it impossible to get too. I'm not sure I'd feel comfortable visiting a temple, considering I would feel like an intruder. I don't know anything about "ritual" so to speak; I know you have to be dressed a certain way, have to bathe, etc. I would feel like an outsider, and there are no "white" people that visit other than maybe for yoga classes. But actual devotees? Probably not.

I honestly don't see a problem with "mixing" religions but other people seem to. I can understand that. However, I consider hell being stuck in the material world, and the devil materialism. Purgatory I consider the constant rebirths, and heaven the place where we can be with God(I'm not sure if Hinduism uses the term "nirvana"; where all our suffering has stopped and we are with God finally). Granted, that's probably a bad way of having other people try to see it the way I do. But it's late at night and that's the best I can do at summarizing.

If you tell us which city you are in, maybe someone here can host you. I guess I don't get this uneasiness in entering a temple. I'm white, perhaps a bit more familiar than you, but I just went to Vancouver, Canada, where my wife and I went to 3 different temples we'd never been to before, and more or less felt at home. I'm exaggerating a bit as I did know people from the one.

If you explain Hell that way, it makes more sense. I personally don't believe in hell, just negative, or hellish states of mind. Within Hinduism, there is a vast array of belief, 100 times as vast as you or I might think. Personally, I'm a monist, and the goal is total merger, losing your identity into God as water into water.

Aum Namasivaya

grames
23 October 2009, 11:36 AM
Hi,

You seem to have answers already and not sure why the disagreement then? In fact, it is not just Shri Prabupada alone but every traditions of SD has same interpretations wrt to Sudra, woman etc. Deva, Devatha is translated as demi-god and if you know a better word, please assume that word and GV stand on this is exactly same. ( FYI, its same in all the vaishnava traditions)



While I might acknowledge that Sri Krsna is the "Supreme Personality of Godhead," I'm not sure you can just turn around and avoid some of the other Devas.

If you understand and accept completely that Sri Krsna is the Supreme then what is the point looking at anything else whether it is Deva, devatha etc? Thats the Vaishnava stand.

I do not see any disagreements yet rather i see some dilemma in accepting what is stated. Am i right?

Lailaphetes
23 October 2009, 04:03 PM
EasternMind: I live in the midwest. I am aware of the different Hindu temples around me; there's even an ISKCON one(not anywhere close to where I live though). Maybe when I'm finally on my own one day, when I'm capable of fully making my own decisions without others looking over me, I will pursue visiting a Hindu temple. In case this would ever happen, who should I talk to before visting a temple? Should I contact a priest or what? If I am completely new to visiting a temple, how should I even go about visiting?

Grames: I guess you're right. This is the problem with every religion I tried understanding. I suppose that's why I became agnostic. Out of curiosity Grames, do you follow any specific tradition of SD(vaisnava, shaiva, etc.) or none at all?

sunyata07
23 October 2009, 04:15 PM
Namaste EM,

Mixing religions is not advised, that's true. I agree with that wholeheartedly. Better you give your all in one practice than dally around with half a dozen others, but it can be terribly hard to sever attachments to your old way of life, your old way of thinking and belief in prayer. Sometimes when I see a crucifix I still feel the urge to make a sign of the cross! In Lailaphete's case, he/she was never averse to Catholicism so that's going to be a lot tougher, if the decision is really to move on to another faith eventually. Perhaps Lailaphetes feels as I have felt before and still feel to some extent about entering a temple. It is difficult to get through the door without a friend or a guide who will tell the newcomer what is what, what should be done and what shouldn't be done. Especially if the newcomer is zealous, the natural feeling for them is that they need to see that they are doing things correctly and not being out of line with other worshippers. Plus, feeling like an outsider is not at all pleasant.

Lailaphetes, then again, there is always time for a first! :) That temple may be very happy to have you. Maybe you could contact a priest or an organiser there, and check out the atmosphere? If they're willing to let you sit in on a few ceremonies or see how puja is conducted? I am thinking of doing the same with a temple in my area. It's not even a temple proper - just a school gym with a few chairs - and knowing the demographics where I live there definitely won't be any "whites" around to blend in with. It was probably the same for EM once when he began paying a visit to his local temples. I'm actually of mixed race myself so it'll be an even odder sight!

Eastern Mind
23 October 2009, 05:40 PM
EasternMind: I live in the midwest. I am aware of the different Hindu temples around me; there's even an ISKCON one(not anywhere close to where I live though). Maybe when I'm finally on my own one day, when I'm capable of fully making my own decisions without others looking over me, I will pursue visiting a Hindu temple. In case this would ever happen, who should I talk to before visting a temple? Should I contact a priest or what? If I am completely new to visiting a temple, how should I even go about visiting?

Grames: I guess you're right. This is the problem with every religion I tried understanding. I suppose that's why I became agnostic. Out of curiosity Grames, do you follow any specific tradition of SD(vaisnava, shaiva, etc.) or none at all?

If its the one in Omaha, the local expert there on Hinduism is a white convert himself. He is so versed that the Indians asked him to be their pundit. At least this is the what I've heard and read on the subject. I can pretty much give you the advice on what to do if the temple has a website. There are basically only 2 or 3 styles. If you go when others are there, you can just pick a person, and copy what they do. Hopefully the person you pick won't be one who is just dropping in and leaving. http://www.hindudharmaforums.com/images/icons/icon10.gif Also, sometime within the next 5 years or so, my wife and I want to do a circle pilgrimage route from here straight down to Phoenix, over to Houston, and then back up to Winnipeg via Wichita, St. Louis, Oklahoma, etc. We'd hit a dozen or more temples on the route. So watch out, if you're somewhere along this trail, I'll come to your house, drag you out with a rope, and take you. (Just kidding.)

Now I am showing my bias here. For me, as mostly a Bhaktar, it was the temple vibration that convinced me of my Hinduness, not scripture.

Aum Namasivaya

dhruva023
23 October 2009, 08:07 PM
It's not even a temple proper - just a school gym with a few chairs - and knowing the demographics where

Hi Sunyata, do they meet every Sunday there and watch Dadaji's videotape?

sunyata07
24 October 2009, 05:19 AM
Hey Dhruva,

I am not sure if it is a weekly congregation for discussion or if it is open for everybody to come in during the day. Who is Dadaji, by the way? This temple seems to have only been started a year or two ago, so it is still finding its feet really. I have heard they are planning to buy a plot of land nearby where they will try and establish a temple proper with a murti. I'll just have to keep checking their website.

dhruva023
24 October 2009, 03:59 PM
I thought it is swadhyay started by Dadaji, but its not. Here is the wiki about Dadaji,
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pandurang_Shastri_Athavale
He has started a great Swadhyay movement. Millions of people are following him. However, there is nothing about him on the Internet.
Anyone interested in Sanatan Dharma should read his the book, The System. It is really hard to get that book. It is not being sold in any store.