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yajvan
19 November 2009, 06:25 PM
hariḥ oṁ
~~~~~~

oṁ gaṇeśvarāya namaḥ
ॐ गणेश्वराय हमः

Namasté

Many here on HDF follow, are devoted or recognize śrī gaṇeśa as their iṣṭa-devatā. The great muni nārad (some write nārada) offers 12 names of śrī gaṇeśa in his gaṇapati stotra found in the nārada purāṇa and also calls out the benefits of knowing this stotra, hence the reason this post is in this folder/section.

When reading this stotra and perhaps appreciating the 12 names of gaṇeśa one may understand śrī gaṇeśa's following. One can read the stotra and its translation at many sites, here is one http://www.lebensplan.com/puranas/ganesh.html (http://www.lebensplan.com/puranas/ganesh.html) .

I have listed the 12 names and added the derivations/roots of gaṇeśa-s names for your consideration. For the names ( nama ) below , I end each name with the nasal ṁ called anusvāra as it appears in the gaṇapati stotra .

This anusvāra is a sound/vibration that follows a vowel, and is sounded through the nose. Take huṁ and bring the final sounding 'uṁ' up into the nose cavity and you have done anusvāra. Hence anusvāra is an after-sound , the nasal sound which is marked by a dot above the line , which always belongs to a preceding vowel.

The question one may ask or ponder - why did nārada-muni list out 12? Why not 15? or 21? or 8? What is significant about this 12?


The 12 names of śrī gaṇeśa

vakratuṇḍaṁ - the One having curved tusks or trunk; vakra = curved, bent, twisted + tuṇḍa = trunk, beak, snout.
ekadantaṁ - the One toothed; eka = one + danta = an elephant's tusk
kṛṣṇapiṅgākṣaṁ - kṛṣṇa = black/dark-blue + piṅgā is a name for a divine being; it also means yellow , reddish-brown , tawny ;
piṅgā is another name for turmeric , hence you can then sense the color that is being suggested.
But what is this color? IS this the body color of gaṇeśa or perhaps his robe? The answer is in ākṣa which has 4 definitions; the 4th one is 'the eye'; akṣa is for in akṣi.
This word is brilliant (IMHO). Akṣi also means the number 2 ( as in two eyes) and it is a noun for the sun and the moon. The Sun and moon are considered the right and left eye. Hence gaṇeśa as kṛṣṇapiṅgākṣa is the Divine Being (piṅgā) with the dark (kṛṣṇa) + reddish-brown-turmeric in color + eyes (akṣa).


gajavaktraṁ - the One with the elephant's mouth or face ; gaja = elephant + vaktra = ' organ of speech', the mouth , face
lambodaraṁ - the pot-belled One; lamba = hanging down + udara = the belly , abdomen , stomach . Hence lambodara is having a large or protuberant belly i.e. potbellied
vikaṭaṁ- has a few meanings. it is defined as unusual size or aspect, huge , large , great. This word also means 'large toothed'.These apply to gaṇeśa. His unusual size, and one-tusked. I am not fond of the name given as grotesque - to me it is unbecoming and I do not see gaṇeśa in this light . So I see Him as the huge ( like an elephant) large toothed One.
vighnarājaṁ - King of obstacles . vighna as a noun is an obstacle , impediment , hindrance , opposition + raja is king.
Yet the beauty of this word vighna when used in the masculine gender also means 'a breaker, destroyer' .
So , in one word we see gaṇeśa as the owner of obstacles, yet to the wise , the destroyer of them at the same time.
This must be the position of a King (raja) - to chose as He wishes and not be bound to any one selection ( a hindrance or a breaker of hindrances)


dhūmaravarṇaṁ- the smoke-colored One; dhūmara is smoke-coloured , smoky , dark-coloured , grey + varṇa is color, cover, tint, dye, etc. We also know varṇa as race, tribe.
A a more subtle definition is 'one who wards off'. Hence this view of gaṇeśa can also be one who 'wards off' the darkess (dhūmara).


bālacandraṁ - the moon-crested One; candra is the moon...it is also shining, glittering + bāla which is new or waxing. This is where the 'crest' definition comes from. As the moon is growing is fullness during its waxing, it is a crest.
Another insight is bāla is the name of a 5 year old elephant - this again connects it to gaṇeśa's form.


vināyakaṁ - the remover of Obstacles. This name is tightly connected to vighnarājaṁ offered above.
We can also look at this word by its components vi+nāya +kaṁ ; 'vi' is apart , asunder , in different directions , to and fro.
That is gaṇeśa's power of 'vi' , to breakup, break apart. And nāya is a leader, a guide. We know that all yajña and pūjā-s begin with invoking gaṇeśa - as the leader, guide (nāya) to break up (vi) any obsticles to one's progress of the homa being performed.
And what then occurs ? 'ka' . Ka has multiple meanings yet for this post we're using 'ka' as splendor, the sun, light, wealth, joy and happiness., therefore;
He who (yaka = who or which) is the leader (nāya) and guide, that breakups (vi) obsticles and brings light and splendor (ka).


gaṇapatiṁ -Lord of the multitudes. gaṇa is a flock , troop , multitude , number , tribe , series , class + pati is Lord, master.
Yet this pati is also 'husband' when uncompounded. It also can be used as 'wife' when taken as female gender use.
Hence this word can be used for those devotee's of gaṇeśa i.e. the the group/tribe (gaṇa) that are husband or wife (pati) of gaṇeśa.


gajānanaṁ - the elephant-faced One. This is simular to gajavaktraṁ mentioned previously; gaja = elephant + na is 'like or as' - Hence He is is like or as an elephant.
Yet note 'na' also means 'not'. But what is 'not' here? It is 'jāna' or birth. Gaṇeśa as eternal , not born.
praṇām

yajvan
20 November 2009, 02:31 PM
hariḥ oṁ
~~~~~~

oṁ gaṇeśvarāya namaḥ
ॐ गणेश्वराय हमः

Namasté


I thought to add a few names from the śrī vināyaka aṣṭotra-śata (108) nama-vallī (names-section); I will continue the post with other names that are insightful (IMHO) and will bring an appreciation to this Being expressed as gaṇeśa-ji¹

oṁ āśritāya namaḥ - gaṇeśa-ji is being hailed as the One taken, or sought, for refuge or shelter; The word āśrita आश्रित is defined as such; Yet a deeper meaning is 'attaching one's self , or joining to'; It is āśritāya-ji that one may attach one's self to for refuge and shelter. From where does this 'attach' come from? The word śrita is defined as cling/attached to, yet also is defined as honored and worshiped.
oṁ adbhutamūrtimate namaḥ - this word is composed of adbhuta + mūrti+ mate ; adbhuta is wonderful, marvelous , extraordinary; mūrti is form ,manifestation , incarnation , personification; mate is mata , that which is honored, esteemed respected; Hence gaṇeśa-ji is hailed as the One respected, honored, with the wonderful form.
oṁ adhyakṣāya namaḥ - adhyakṣa means perceptible to the senses, some may say an eye-witness. So in one sense, gaṇeśa-ji is considered He who is available to the senses. Yet in the core of the word we have yakṣā known as a supernatural benevolent being; So, one can say it is He, that benevolent being that is available to the senses.

Yet there are those that say one need to recognize 'ad' in this name as it means 'to feed' and also means to consume as in adana. This word adayate suggests (to me) ad+aya Which means 'ad' to feed + 'aya' means favorable fortune. So , in this case, it is gaṇeśa-ji that 'feeds' good fortune to the devotee. And how is this done? by Him as vināyakaṁ - the remover of obstacles.
I mentioned 'ad' means to consume and if we look to another definition of 'aya' it is a noun for a periodical sacrifice . Hence gaṇeśa-ji can be seen as the One that consumes the sacrifice. He is 1st to be recognized at a yajña for its favorable outcome - hence his is presiding over it for a fruitful (aya) result.praṇām

words

jī जी - means sir, or mister
ji जि - means to conquer or conquering, to overcome, to win over. What is implied is that one has one overcome the self with the SELF. IN the case of gaṇeśvarāya, He is the SELF.

Eastern Mind
20 November 2009, 03:16 PM
Yajvan, I have 2 questions. Hope you don't mind.

1) Do you know why some of the sets of 108 names vary? If one does research, you get different sets.

2) If readers submit names, can you give your view, or the explanation?

(Pillaiyar --- one of my favorite names. And the other = Ganesha itself)

Aum Namasivaya

yajvan
20 November 2009, 04:54 PM
hariḥ oṁ
~~~~~~

oṁ gaṇeśvarāya namaḥ
ॐ गणेश्वराय हमः

Namasté EM,

Yajvan, I have 2 questions. Hope you don't mind.
1) Do you know why some of the sets of 108 names vary? If one does research, you get different sets.
2) If readers submit names, can you give your view, or the explanation?
(Pillaiyar --- one of my favorite names. And the other = Ganesha itself)


I am happy to assist where I can. If others have favorite names, let's all view them and dis-assemble them to find the diamonds inside of these words. I am happy to help.

Why different names for the 108? It is my assessment that there are more then 1,008 names for gaṇeśa-ji and we sometimes see them 108 at a time.

re: your word list.
Let's do one and I will add one complimentary name that extends the name you have offered, gaṇeśa.

gaṇeśa गणेश - we can look as gaṇ+iśa

gaṇ - is to count , number , enumerate , sum up , add up ; it also means to count one's number as in a flock or troop, a herd, a group.
iśa is viewed as īśa meaning master , lord , ruler; coincidentally it is another name of śivaHence we have gaṇ+iśa , the Lord, ruler of the sums/group/herd/multitudes. In this case we are collecting everything in this known and unknown universe ( most all things I can think of belong to some group - stars, atoms, people, animals, fauna-flora, solids, liquids, gases, devatā, etc.).

From here we can go to gaṇeśvarāya; like above, gaṇeśa is addressed as Lord of the multitudes , and as for varāya, it means to be or represent a boon - a great gift. So gaṇeśa-ji is viewed as the One, The lord and gift of the multitudes. This is found in my salutation above:

oṁ gaṇeśvarāya namaḥ
ॐ गणेश्वराय हमः

praṇām

yajvan
21 November 2009, 12:22 AM
hariḥ oṁ
~~~~~~

oṁ gajavaktraṁ namaḥ
ॐ गजवक्त्रं हमः


Namasté EM,


(Pillaiyar --- one of my favorite names. )
Aum Namasivaya
Regarding this pillaiyar - let's see if this makes sense.
pilla पिल्ल is blear-eyed¹ in saṃskṛt; some would say this applies as elephant's eyes are round ,full, and often tearful ~bleary-eyed ~; we need to look a little deeper.
We find pīlu defined as an elephant. (IMO) this comes from an additional meaning of pīlu, the stem/trunk of a palm tree. Hence an elephant's snout looking roughly the same.

Yet I am not in great comfort with these definitions and I think we need to look to an ajacent language for help.

Our HDF Tamil Nadu friends can assist with this post. In the Tamil language (and I am far from even being aquanted with this language) piḷḷe means 'child' and piḷḷaiyar means 'nobile child' - so says R.L.Brown¹ . Some say piḷḷaiyar means 'little child' - again our Tamil language-speaking friends on HDF can correct this information and steer us in the right direction.

There is the notion by a few folks I read that the original notion of piḷḷaiyar could have meant a young elephant and hence the association to gaṇeśa. If we are talking 'young' then gaṇeśa as bālacandra will apply. How so?

It means the moon-crested One; candra is the moon. It is also shining, glittering + bāla, which is new or waxing. This bāla is the name of a 5 year old (young) elephant, connecting us back to ~piḷḷaiyar~.

praṇām

references and words

By R. L. Brown author of gaṇeśa: studies of an Asian god
blear as a verb when used with object:
to make dim, as with tears or inflammation:
a biting wind that bleared the vision.
as an adjective means of the eyes, dim / welled up with tears.

Eastern Mind
21 November 2009, 07:20 AM
Yajvan:

Thank you for such detail. You could write a book on the names and variations! There was one I remember from earlier days that went as below. (Please forgive my transliteration typing skills)

Sailendra tanujot sanga kelanot sukamanasaya..

I am receiving the reconfirming thoughts of His diversity. Makes me feel so grateful I live so close to one of his newer temples.

Another question: In your explanation it was Vakratundam, and yet I am more familiar with Vakratundaya. What is the difference between m and ya?

Aum Namasivaya

yajvan
21 November 2009, 09:19 AM
hariḥ oṁ
~~~~~~

oṁ gajavaktraṁ namaḥ
ॐ गजवक्त्रं हमः

Namasté EM,



Yajvan:

Thank you for such detail. You could write a book on the names and variations! (Please forgive my transliteration typing skills)

Sailendra tanujot sukamanasaya..

Another question: In your explanation it was Vakratundam, and yet I am more familiar with Vakratundaya. What is the difference between m and ya? Aum Namasivaya

Yes, I concur. Multiple names.

The gaṇapati stotra found in the nārada purāṇa list 12 ( why so? I will offer in a future post if there is interest)
The mudgala purāṇa lists 32 names.
the skanda purāṇa lists 56 vināyaka-s within the location of vārāṇasī.
The śāradātilakaka-tantra lists 51 names .
The śrī vināyaka aṣṭotra-śata list 108 - this is the present list I am offering names from.Are there more ? yes, more and more where gaṇeśa-ji is discussed, listed, and stories told.
But where is this thousand names of gaṇeśa I mentioned in a previous post? One can find it in the gaṇeśa purāṇa where the sahasranāma ( 1000 names) can be found.

re: vakratuṇḍaṁ
vakratuṇḍaṁ = vakratuṇḍa , no difference other then how the name is ended.
This ending is anusvāra. Here is the explanation:

I end each name with the nasal ṁ called anusvāra as it appears in the gaṇapati stotra .

This anusvāra is a sound/vibration that follows a vowel, and is sounded through the nose. Take huṁ and bring the final sounding 'uṁ' up into the nose cavity and you have done anusvāra. Hence anusvāra is an after-sound , the nasal sound which is marked by a dot above the line , which always belongs to a preceding vowel

Lets end this post with the seed-sound of gaṇeśa, gaṁ गं. Holding this vibration we hold gaṇeśa-ji

praṇām

Eastern Mind
21 November 2009, 09:52 AM
A list of 1000 is here:

http://www.indiadivine.org/audarya/hindu-sadhanas/201611-re-1008-names-ganesh.html

Yet some of the names on the 108 lists don't come here. (Now its becoming trivia more than anything.)

The list I am the most familiar with is the ine from "Loving Ganesha" .

Aum Namasivaya

yajvan
22 November 2009, 08:23 AM
hariḥ oṁ
~~~~~~

oṁ gajavaktraṁ namaḥ
ॐ गजवक्त्रं हमः

Namasté

adding to the list...



oṁ mūṣikavāhanaya namaḥ - gaṇeśa-ji is the One that rides (or has a vehicle) a mouse or mūṣika; vāhana means 'carrying' ; so this mouse carries gaṇeśa-ji. Vāhana also means riding, driving and in a broader sense any vehicle or conveyance or draught-animal , carriage , chariot , waggon , horse that one may use for carrying.
What is the significance of a mouse then? Does this represent something?
oṁ pāpahāriṇe namaḥ - gaṇeśa-ji is the One that takes away/removes pāpa. This pāpa is defined as bad , vicious , wicked , evil , wretched , vile ~ inauspicious ~ behaviors; misfortune , ill-luck , trouble , mischief, and harmful conditions. Since gaṇeśa-ji is the remover of obstacles (vināyaka), these pāpa are impediments to fullness (bhūma);
The pāpa-s are blemishes or moham (anything that leads to error ; delusion).
Hence the one that takes away or captures ( capturing the pāpa) is hāri. Now the ending is 'ṇe' and I see this 'ṇa' meaning 'certainty' and also a 'gift' ; it is also a noun of śiva, but look to be corrected on this matter.


oṁ parasmai namaḥ - I see this word this way: para+as+ma+i which infers a spelling of parāsmai.
para we know as Supreme; 'as' is abide in, dwell +
'ma' is measure and also máyā +
i is to spread and or appear, yet the 5th definiton is applicable 'to go away , escape , pass , retire '.
Now we have He who is beyond (i) máyā (ma¹) + who abides (as) + in the Supreme (para).
Others define this in a simular manner : Him, for whom there is no other. This makes perfect sense - He is unsurpassable (anuttara) and Supreme, hence there can be no other.praṇām

words
ma can also be 'mad' , 2nd definition to enjoy bliss and/or to gladden , exhilarate , intoxicate , animate , inspire

sunyata07
22 November 2009, 03:55 PM
Namaste Yajvan,

First of all, thank you very much for this thread. I have been slowly familiarising myself with the 108 names of the Lord, although I have realised like EM that some sources do vary considerably and I have often been confused as to why. Your explanations on the Sanskrit definitions as well as the various nuances of Sri Ganesha's name are an invaluable source of help for me and other Ganesha bhaktars.


What is the significance of a mouse then? Does this represent something?

I have often wondered myself what is the real significance behind the mouse! How can such a small animal carry portly Ganesha's frame? It is a nice little lesson on how appearances can be deceiving. I have taken Ganesha's riding the mouse to mean that the highest knowledge does not have to conform to what our human views on what should and should not be. I have read long ago that the mouse is one of the few animals who is pervasive enough to appear in nearly all societies around the world. Much like Ganesha seems to be worshipped nearly everywhere. I have posted before on the Devoted to Lord Ganesha thread (http://hindudharmaforums.com/showthread.php?t=4361&page=3) what I felt the mouse could mean inadvertently when I was reflecting over it quietly after meditation. It is a popular belief in the West (not sure if it exists in the East) that elephants are afraid of mice. I sometimes think it is very fitting Lord Ganesha has selected the mouse as his vehicle, because it has taught me that if you want to succeed in any endeavour you must learn to face your fears if you want to overcome them.

yajvan
22 November 2009, 09:17 PM
hariḥ oṁ
~~~~~~

oṁ gajavaktraṁ namaḥ
ॐ गजवक्त्रं हमः

Namasté sunyata,


I have often wondered myself what is the real significance behind the mouse! How can such a small animal carry portly Ganesha's frame? It is a nice little lesson on how appearances can be deceiving. I have taken Ganesha's riding the mouse to mean that the highest knowledge does not have to conform to what our human views on what should and should not be. I have read long ago that the mouse is one of the few animals who is pervasive enough to appear in nearly all societies around the world. Much like Ganesha seems to be worshipped nearly everywhere.
It is a popular belief in the West (not sure if it exists in the East) that elephants are afraid of mice. I sometimes think it is very fitting Lord Ganesha has selected the mouse as his vehicle, because it has taught me that if you want to succeed in any endeavour you must learn to face your fears if you want to overcome them.

You offer some nice insights - thank you.

If I may let me offer an extention to what you offer.

mūṣikavāhanaya is gaṇeśa-ji, the One that rides (or has a vehicle) a mouse or mūṣika; vāhana means 'carrying'. This we know.
Now another name of gaṇeśa is vītabhayāya वीतभय - 'fearless , undaunted' . So, gaṇeśa-ji rides mūṣika , yet does this without fear.

His name gives us some direction for his devotee . This is found in the word vīta which means 'trained, quiet'. This word is easily traced back to gaṇeśa as it also means 'the driving or guiding of an elephant' .

For the devotee's mind that is 'trained, quiet' is closer to fearless-ness, i.e. being without bhaya ( fear , alarm, dread or apprehension).

One must ask ' from where does this fear arise from? '. We look to the bṛhadaraṇyaka upaniṣad as it tells us the following: Any time there is a sense of 2, fear arises i.e. dvitiyad vai bhayam bhavati - Fear (bhayam) is born(bhavat) of duality (dvitiyad).

Aligning our self to the SELF ( the Supreme Self, gaṇeśa-ji) then fears are no more (kadācaneti ); kadā is 'never more' + ca is mischief, 'to and fro' i.e. the mind, if we look at it as 'can' then this is 'to hurt ,injure' +eti is 'iti' or 'thus'.

Kadācaneti is then the condition that one is never more in mischief/injured, thus. Some say na kadā - never more + dā is 'cutting off' , also means 'pain'. Hence one is nevermore in pain.

praṇām

yajvan
24 November 2009, 01:55 PM
hariḥ oṁ
~~~~~~

oṁ gajavaktraṁ namaḥ
ॐ गजवक्त्रं हमः

Namasté
a few more names and accompanying insights...

oṁ agraṇye namaḥ - gaṇeśa-ji is considered the One that is first born. Yet I think this is not the best fit for this word.
This word agra is the indicator for me. It is defined as 'placed in front, foremost, 1st' . If one meant to say 'first born' then it could be written as agraja or agrajā. It would be agra which is 1st (or foremost, placed in front) + ja which is born. To me that would be the best fit.
What I believe this name of gaṇeśa-ji is aiming at is the following: agra as foremost, placed in front + ṇye. This ṇye I see as nyas. This word 'nyas' is 'to place on the head' , ' to call to mind' , to receive with reverence. This then suggests that gaṇeśa-ji is the 1st and foremost one calls to mind and receives with reverence. In every yajña , śṛi gaṇeśa is 'first and foremost' invoked for a successful pūjā - to remove any obstacles to its success. ( Also I am happy to be corrected, if others on HDF have a different point of view on the construction of this most potent name agraṇye )

If we really wanted to take this idea further to see why 'first born' may apply We can look to agni. We know that agni¹ is called '1st born' among men. That is, the first devatā to be kindled within man.
If we aligned gaṇeśa-ji to agni would this be a 'stretch', would we be taking excessive liberties to call gaṇeśa-ji as agni?

If we look to atharva veda, gaṇapati atharva-śiṣra and focus on the svarūpa tattva section, is says the following:
tvam indras tvam agnistvaṁ vāyustvaṁ -or- tva you (thou) are indra, you are agni you are vāyu.

Does this stotra give other tattva-s of gaṇeśa-ji ? Yes indeed, but lets look at closing line. It says, bhuvaḥ svaoṁ. This has significance - bhuvaḥ svaoṁ tells me the following:

bhuva - is considered the atmosphere, yet is a noun for agni
bhū - to manifest, exhibit or show; to be, become or transform
svaoṁ - is looked at in the following manner, sva+oṁ ; sva = one's own ; also a noun for viṣṇu + oṁ or praṇava.
This oṁ is considered tāra - 'a spiritual monosyllable that saves' ; its root is tṛ , meaning 'carrying across , a savior' , 'protector' or rudra. What else is oṁ considered? Brahman or Reality.So, this last sentence sums-up gaṇeśa-ji as Reality, the one that possesses or is the embodiment of oṁ; the one that protects (rudra), expands (viṣṇu), transforms (bhū) and the one that is divine light and inspiration, agni.
Such is the beauty that can be viewed from this name beginning with agraṇye.

oṁ ajāya namaḥ - gaṇeśa-ji is being recognized as the unborn One. This word ajāya can be viewed as a+jā+ya .
This then yields the following definition; 'a' = not + 'jā' = born, produced, caused by, or descended from + 'ya' can be defined as 'joining' i.e. join the 'a' +'jā' to = not born or produced; There are other ways too, to consider this 'ya', but for now lets go with joining.
oṁ akalmaṣāya namaḥ - gaṇeśa-ji is the One free from impurity. We will approach this word the same way as the last
entry: a+kalmaṣā+ya. We know 'a' = not ; kalmaṣā is defined as impure or stained. And we can apply 'ya' once again as 'joining'.Hence gaṇeśa-ji recognized as the One that is unstained, unblemished, free from impurity.

Now my question for those that wish to ponder this. These 3 names are related, yet can be seem as somewhat perplexing, no? First we say gaṇeśa-ji is the first born, then we say He is unborn, and He with without blemish. Why did I say the 3rd name akalmaṣāya, was part of this perplexity? If one is 'born' then the stain of rebirth is there. Yet we say gaṇeśa-ji is ajāya, without birth.

Does any one have a point of view or opinion on how to rationalize these 3 names? I will add this question to another I have asked in post 1:
The question one may ask or ponder - why did nārada-muni list out 12? Why not 15? or 21? or 8? What is the significance of this 12?


tvam sākasādātmāsi nityaṃ - you (gaṇeśa) are the eternal, evident Self

praṇām

references
agni: if this is of interest , please see HDF post http://www.hindudharmaforums.com/showthread.php?t=4743 (http://www.hindudharmaforums.com/showthread.php?t=4743)

yajvan
25 November 2009, 12:19 PM
hariḥ oṁ
~~~~~~

oṁ gajavaktraṁ namaḥ
ॐ गजवक्त्रं हमः

Namasté
a few more insights...

If we look to the śiva aṣṭottaraśata nāmāvali & the śrī vināyaka aṣṭotra-śata (108) nama-vallī (names, section) we find similar names for śiva and gaṇeśa.
For the detail-minded reader, one may ask the śiva aṣṭottaraśata nāmāvali uses the name 'vali' at the end and the śrī vināyaka aṣṭotra-śata nama-vallī says 'vallī', why so?
vali वलि is defined as a line or stroke made with fragrant unguents on the person . This is the poetic way of saying the 108 names are being graciously offered to śiva in adoration; With the word vallī वल्ली it is informing us of the section of a book from where the names reside; vallī could have easily been exchanged for vali.

Back to the post. I thought to offer 3 of them as an example, and then take a look at the similarities of their bījā (seed) vibrations/mantras.

Both are praised as:

oṁ ajāya namaḥ - This definition and review was offered in post 12 above.
oṁ somasūryāgnilocanāya namaḥSomasūryāgnilocana is composed of soma सोम the Moon; We find soma throughout the veda. It is considered the essence of delight. The moon deals with emotions and the mind to name a few. And sūrya is the Sun सूर्य (some call rāvi) we find in the veda-s as Savitr. Sūrya in jyotiṣ is the ātmakaraka - the indicator of the soul, the self. And agni अग्नि is flame, fire, also Divine Will. Agni is the 1st word that appears in the ṛgveda (rig veda from ṛc ऋच् to praise). And last we have locana लोचन which is the organ of sight, the eye. It also means illuminating, brightening. So we have śiva & gaṇeśa hailed as soma + sūrya + agni + locana : the One whose eyes are the Sun, the Moon and Agni.

oṁ gaṇanāthāya namaḥGaṇanātha is gaṇa गण or multitude , number , tribe , series , class, troops or classes of deities or beings + nātha नाथ is protector, lord. śiva & gaṇeśa is being hailed as the Lord and protector of the multitudes, of the host of beings. Just by inspection of this name we can easily see gaṇa as the core to a few of gaṇeśa-ji's names i.e. gaṇeśa, gaṇapati, etc. And we find many of names that being with 'ga' i.e. the names just mentioned + gajānana, gajavaktra, etc.

On sounds of śiva & gaṇeśa
gaṇeśa

I mentioned in post 12 above: If we look to atharva veda, gaṇapati atharva-śiṣra and focus on the svarūpa tattva section the closing line says gaṇeśa-ji is bhuvaḥ svaoṁ i.e. Reality, the one that possesses or is the embodiment of oṁ. Now hold that thought …lets go to śiva

śiva
In the Varadā tantra¹ there is a śloka that explains the bījā (seed sound or mantra) of śiva/bhairava and is considered śiva-praṇava, hūṁ. Hence in the various śastra we find different praṇava. We know in the veda we find oṁ as praṇava; In the śakta tantra ( that of Śrī Devī) we find hrīṁ, and in the bhairava tantra we find hūṁ.
Now we have the two sounds hūṁ हूं and oṁ ॐ. Here is the connection. Note how we sound-out these vibrations:

oṁ is aum or ah +oo + ṁ ;
hūṁ is ha + oo + ṁRecall from other posts that ṁ is anusvāra or nasalization of the preceding vowel. That is, the energy/vibration is moved up to the nose cavity closer and finally to ājñā cakra¹ if possible. Yet look at the similar beauty of these two sounds:
ah +oo + ṁ & ha + oo + ṁ Notice how one is in the other, the symmetry?

The difference is in this 'h'. Much more can be said¹ about this 'ha' and ḥ, but that spills outside the theme of this string on gaṇeśa-ji and His naming, sounds, etc.

Hence:
One can say by name, knowledge and sound the interconnectedness of śiva & gaṇeśa. Both full expressions of brahman.

praṇām

words and references

Varadā tantra
ha śivah kathito devī ū bhairava ihocyate |
parārtho nādo śabdastu bindurduhkhaharārthakah |
varmabiijatrayo hyatra kathitastava yatnatah ||

Oh goddess (devi), (the letter) "ha" (ha) is said to be (kathitah) śiva (śiváh), (while the vowel) "ū" (uu) is said to be (ucyáte) Bhairava (bhairavah) here (ihá). The sound (śábdah) nādá or half-moon (nādáh) signifies (árthah) Pára or Highest (árthah) certainly (tú), (and) bindú or dot (bindúh) means (arthakah) destroyer (hara) of pain (duhkhá). Here (átra) the three (letters) (tráyas) (forming) the armor (varma) seed-mántra (bīja) are spoken (kathitah) to you (táva) diligently and with effort (yatnata-s) indeed (hí) ||
So what does this say? hūṁ is Śiva-praṇava.
ājñā cakra -some additional information you may find of use. http://www.hindudharmaforums.com/sho...highlight=ajna (http://www.hindudharmaforums.com/sho...highlight=ajna)
More on this 'ha' and ḥ at this HDF post: http://www.hindudharmaforums.com/showpost.php?p=35676&postcount=34 (http://www.hindudharmaforums.com/showpost.php?p=35676&postcount=34)

yajvan
27 November 2009, 03:14 PM
hariḥ oṁ
~~~~~~

oṁ gajavaktraṁ namaḥ
ॐ गजवक्त्रं हमः

Namasté

I wrote,



In the Varadā tantra¹ there is a śloka that explains the bījā (seed sound or mantra) of śiva/bhairava and is considered śiva-praṇava, hūṁ. Hence in the various śastra we find different praṇava. We know in the veda we find oṁ as praṇava; In the śakta tantra ( that of Śrī Devī) we find hrīṁ, and in the bhairava tantra we find hūṁ.
Now we have the two sounds hūṁ हूं and oṁ ॐ. Here is the connection. Note how we sound-out these vibrations:
oṁ is aum or ah +oo + ṁ ;
hūṁ is ha + oo + ṁ

Recall from other posts that ṁ is anusvāra or nasalization of the preceding vowel. That is, the energy/vibration is moved up to the nose cavity closer and finally to ājñā cakra¹ if possible. Yet look at the similar beauty of these two sounds:
ah +oo + ṁ & ha + oo + ṁ ...Notice how one is in the other, the symmetry?
I thought it worthy of mentioning, hūṁ हूं is also found in the Chāndogya Upaniṣad. I mention 'also' as this word is defined in the Varadā tantra, per post 13 above.

It is written as हुं huṁ and appears in the Chāndogya Upaniṣad 1.13.3 ( 1st khaṇḍa, 13th śloka , 3rd pāda) .

It says, anirukttas trayodaśaḥ stobhaḥ sañcaro huṁ-kāraḥ
The indefinable (anirukta¹) is the 13th (trayodaśa) stobha (interjection), the sound¹ हुं huṁ-kāraḥ.

A stobha is a chanted interjection in a sāman ( sāma ved chants); The interjections are used in the chant to make them more conducive/musical to the ear , adding sama ( even-ness, consistency) to the chant.

Yet this stobhaḥ , huṁ , is of special interest. It is defined as anirukta, unspeakable. Why so?

It is the sound of the underlying Reality of all. It is considered of indefinite origin. Why ? Because existence, Being (sattā) is without origin - no beginning, no end. It is unspeakable due to its fullness (bhūman) that connot be contained in sound or form . Yet we do the best we can. It is that huṁ or hūṁ and oṁ that is praṇava. Sacred syllables or akṣara. Akṣara means syllable, yet in the same breath is defined as imperishable. It is as if the total ocean could be held in one drop of water.
Such is the value and our ability to hear the resonance of huṁ हुं hūṁ हूं and oṁ ॐ




praṇām

words


anirukta अनिरुक्त - is 'not explained', indefinable; it is unspeakable, un-uttered
stobha - a chanted interjection in a sāman ( sāma ved chants); .
My view only: The way to this word 'sound' is interesting: sañcaro is sañ+cara. This cara is moving, shaking ; in music it is called mūrchanā. Its meaning in mūrchā = 'melody' ( amongst other things) and melody =mūrchanā
kāra - is a song , hymn of praise

yajvan
28 November 2009, 12:27 PM
hariḥ oṁ
~~~~~~

oṁ gajavaktraṁ namaḥ
ॐ गजवक्त्रं हमः

Namasté


I offered the following:


Akṣara means syllable, yet in the same breath is defined as imperishable. It is as if the total ocean could be held in one drop of water.
Such is the value and our ability to hear the resonance of huṁ हुं hūṁ हूं and oṁ ॐ

A question to ponder - do you associate yourself with the drop of water, or the water in the drop?

praṇām

yajvan
29 November 2009, 01:43 PM
hariḥ oṁ
~~~~~~

oṁ gajavaktraṁ namaḥ
ॐ गजवक्त्रंह मः

Namasté

If you recall or happen to read other posts, we know that knowledge can appear on 3 levels:

ādhibautika आधिभौतिक- the physical level - derived or produced from the elements
ādhidaivika आधिदैविक- the cosmic level pertaining to the devatā
ādhytmika आध्यात्मिक- of the Supreme, Self.With gaṇeśa-ji we may view Him on these 3 levels also. On the physical level we see gajānana - the elephant-faced One. We see this represented as a mūrti ( a figure, form, appearance) with tusks, snout, mace, noose (pāśa), etc. ; they all are phyical, and all are symbols to tell us something.
On the cosmic level we recognize gaṇeśa-ji as devatā, Divine. And on the ādhytmika level He is the Supreme, of Reality itself.


Now how do we get to Reality , the Supreme? In the gaṇapati atharva-śiṣra it informs us, tvam sākasādātmāsi nityaṃ- you (gaṇeśa) are the eternal, evident Self . The last line says bhuvaḥ svaoṁ. This tells us gaṇeśa-ji is Reality, the one that possesses or is the embodiment of oṁ.

Now we switch to the taittirīya upaniṣad 1.8.1 and it says,
omiti brahma omitīdaṁsarvam or, oṁ is brahman oṁ is this all.

This śloka goes on to inform us of how this oṁ is applied, yet no need to list them all out. We now IMHO can see the alignment: gaṇeśa-ji is the embodiment of oṁ ( bhuvaḥ svaoṁ) and the taittirīyopaniṣad tells us this oṁ is brahman, oṁ is this all ( omiti brahma omitīdaṁsarvam ).


Hence from my vantage point gaṇeśa-ji brings to us the quality of brahman , as approachable. This Being is considered sulabha i.e. easily accessible some call this word easily approachable, due to His grace (anugraha).

This word sulabha is also defined as advantageous, suitable. Hence it suggests that gaṇeśa-ji is the embodiment of oṁ , brahman is not only approachable , but to one's advantage to do so. Hence this, IMO, is why there are many gaṇeśa upāsaka-s ( worshippers).


praṇām

yajvan
30 November 2009, 11:10 AM
hariḥ oṁ
~~~~~~

oṁ gajavaktraṁ namaḥ
ॐ गजवक्त्रं हमः

Namasté

We are advised to invoke gaṇeśa-ji at the beginning of any task, action. He is vighnarāja¹ - King of obstacles and also the remover of obstacles; His name vighnarāja was reviewed in post 1 above.

As you would expect there is a deeper signifincance that is implied here. Siddhi is considered a ~wife~ of gaṇeśa-ji. Siddhi as you we know means perfection, accomplishment and also the special powers one may experience during the advancement of their spiritual pursuits. Hence, we then invoke gaṇeśa-ji with every new task, new beginning. Yet consider this regarding 'every new task, new beginning'. Every day is a new beginning, no?

Every hour (some prefer muhūrta= 48 min.) is a new beginning. Every muhūrtena (moment) is new. Every direction one may turn N,S,E,W (diś¹) is now a new direction from the previous. As you can see we can go on-and-on regarding this newness. So, what is one to do? remember, adore vighnarāja for every moment. Yet how practical , possible is that? How does one accomplish that in a meaningful manner?

Post 12 gives us a hint: tvam sākasādātmāsi nityaṃ - you (gaṇeśa) are the eternal, evident Self. If one is possessed of the Self, then one is communion with gaṇeśa-ji continuiously, there is no difference. There is not one iota of effort needed to be mindful of gaṇeśa-ji every instant.

The 'siddhi' of adoration of gaṇeśa-ji comes when one has realized one's own true Self ( brahman). That is why post 16 suggested: This Being is considered sulabha i.e. easily accessible some call this word easily approachable, due to His grace (anugraha).

Are you not easily approachable to your own Self? If 'no' then what is the obstacle? And who is the remover of obstacles? Hence a formula has just been suggested.

If one remains identified to a 'drop of water' then one is bound to that individuality, to the limited. It is when one associates with, identifies with 'the water in the drop' that the limitations are no more .

praṇām

words



vighnarāja - vighna as a noun is an obstacle , impediment , hindrance , opposition + raja is king. Yet the beauty of this word vighna when used in the masculine gender also means 'a breaker, destroyer' .
So , in one word we see gaṇeśa as the owner of obstacles, yet to the wise , the destroyer of them at the same time. This must be the position of a King (raja) - to chose as He wishes and not be bound to any one selection ( a hindrance or a breaker of hindrances)
directions
diś - quarter or region pointed at , direction , cardinal
The major directions (4 in number): prācī , east ; dakṣiṇā , south ; pratici , west ; and udīcī , north , Not to mention the 'in betweens' NE, SE, etc. and up and down.
time

muhūrtena - a moment , instant , any short space of time ; Science measures the smallest period of time measued by science is called 'plank time'
in sanātana dharma there is the truti and the trasarenu (trasa = quivering) , defining the small fractions of time.

sunyata07
30 November 2009, 05:21 PM
Namaste Yajvan,

The question one may ask or ponder - why did nārada-muni list out 12? Why not 15? or 21? or 8? What is significant about this 12?

Please explain the significance of these 12 names. I have read before of the Dwadasa (twelve) forms of Ganesha for each of the rashis of the zodiac, but beyond this I do not understand why Narada Muni has given this number and not some other one.

OM Shanti

yajvan
30 November 2009, 08:35 PM
hariḥ oṁ
~~~~~~

oṁ gajavaktraṁ namaḥ
ॐ गजवक्त्रं हमः

Namasté sunyata,




The question one may ask or ponder - why did nārada-muni list out 12? Why not 15? or 21? or 8? What is significant about this 12?

Please explain the significance of these 12 names. I have read before of the Dwadasa (twelve) forms of Ganesha for each of the rashis of the zodiac, but beyond this I do not understand why Narada Muni has given this number and not some other one. OM Shanti

What you offer is correct. Nārada-muni's knowledge is the understanding of obstructions and how they can be removed. This can be seen from one's birth chart. There are specific names for obstructions , yet that leads us to a joytish discussion and a different HDF folder. That said, look to this HDF post : http://www.hindudharmaforums.com/showthread.php?t=1726

It will review the logic here, and also show you a chart of the 12 names of gaṇeśa-ji . This can be printed out. The notion is we do japa or ajapa of all 12 names; one name aligned to each house house ( bhāva ). Since this is done many add the seed sound first, and end with namah .

So , the first house ( Aries) one would chant/murmur:
oṁ gaṁ vakratuṇḍa namaḥ
The second house ( Taurus) would then be:
oṁ gaṁ ekadanta namaḥ

Some jyotiṣa's would say start this process with your lagna¹ (ascendent) first, then follow the 12 names from from there.
So, if one were born with Virgo lagna, then the mantra set of 12 starting with oṁ gaṁ vakratuṇḍa namaḥ would begin there. The next house, the 2nd bhāva would be Libra and the next mantra oṁ gaṁ ekadanta namaḥ aligned to that house.

I for one have no personal preference , yet I use the 'natural' zodiac count, with Aries being 1st house for the chant to begin.
We can always go deeper and wider on this knowledge, but for now I think the HDF link to the Jyotish folder will be of assistence.


Hope this helps.

praṇām

words

lagna means adhered , adhering or clinging to , attached to . But to what? It is the sign that was 'attached' to the East horizon on your exact birth time.

yajvan
01 December 2009, 01:38 PM
hariḥ oṁ
~~~~~~

oṁ gajavaktraṁ namaḥ
ॐ गजवक्त्रं हमः

Namasté,
Talking of removing obstacles in the last post, let me offer the following.

We have talked about gaṇeśa-ji as the remover of obstacles. There are many in life. What are some of those one finds on a spiritual path ? Lets look to one purāṇa that calls out 8; as you would expect 8 is to be associated with gaṇeśa-ji.

There is a dialog that takes place between brahmā's son dakṣa and the ṛṣi mudgala - hence it is called the mudgala purāṇam. I do not possess this full purāṇa, but have excerpts from it ( 1.17.24 to 1.17.28 ). This is one of 2 books totally dedicated to gaṇeśa-ji and hence a favorite of the gāṇapatya-s , those that are devoted to gaṇeśa-ji .

These 8 are considered the inner enemies the ~asura~ ; It is gaṇeśa-ji and his incarnations (avatāra) that has the śakti to rid the individual of these 8. What is important to note ( as I see it) the list of 8 get increasingly difficult as they get closer and closer to the core of the ego ( as you would think); the ones at the surface are behaviors that can be wrestled to the ground and fall away with one's expansion of consciousness and knowledge; yet as one goes deeper and closer to the 'me' feeling, the behaviors are engrained as if one was removing the white color from rice.

Lets look at the list of afflictions and the expression of gaṇeśa-ji that is to remove this blemish. This is the part I have yet to comprehend… why this quality of gaṇeśa-ji and not another? We know there is reasons, yet I have yet to find the deeper significance - any help is always appreciated.

Matsarya-asura is considered envy or jealousy; this stirs selfishness , greed jealousy and hostility. 'You have more then me. I feel lesser then you and I want what you have; I am not even certain I need what you have but you have more of it then me and I want to be equal or better then you.'
It is vakratuṇḍa (gaṇeśa with the twisting trunk) that removes this blemish.


Mada-asura is arrogance or conceit. Some say this stems from excessive pride. 'Look at me , how I am great or better or possess more then you' . These possessions or collections can be friends, homes, cars, family members, government affiliations, knowledge, memory ability, etc.
Ekadanta ( or gaṇeśa with the single tusk) that overcomes this blemish.


Moha-asura is delusion, error in thinking. It is not what you don't know, but what you do know that is just not right. 'The world is flat, the sun goes around the earth, what I eat has no bearing on my behavior, killing for sport is okay'.
It is Mahodara (gaṇeśa as the big bellied One) that removes this moha/delusion.


Lobha-asura is considered greed but IMHO it’s a bit more subtle then that. It is a longing for something with impatience, the brings covetousness, over eagerness to possess and hold something , this to me is greed. ' I must have that and I cannot wait, how do I get that now, immediately? '. Some say lobha is the child of fear, the fear of not having enough, being less.
Gajānana (or gaṇeśa the one with the elephant face ) is the one to remove this blemish.


Krodha-asura is anger which brings wrath; some say krodha is the child of lobha (just mentioned). It arises when a desire is not fulfilled, obstructed. The Bhāgavad gītā ( Chapter 3 37th śloka) clearly calls out krodha क्रोध i.e. anger ,wrath 'know this to be the enemy here on earth' say Kṛṣṇa.
Look to any child that does not get their way - what occurs ? tantrum, crying, anger, tears from not getting what they immediately want.
Laṁbodara (the pot-belled One) overcomes this affliction .


Kāma-asura is lust. It is fueled by the excessive thirst-desire for objects of the senses; then once possessed is the over-indulgence of this desire. It is said once 'thirst' marries kāma they produce decay and corruption as their off-spring.
Vikaṭa (gaṇeśa as the unusual sized One i.e. huge , large ) overcomes this affliction.


Māma-asura is considered possessiveness. Yet note the significance of māma defined as 'belonging to mine or me'. Note we age closer and closer to ego, me, mine only.
What do we really own? What can we really possess to say it is 'mine'. That we have authority over it, that we created it. Do we think because we have purchased something it makes it our possession. This is the delusion of māma, of mine-ness. That I possess and rein over an object, person, place or thing. We can look to the Maitreya Upaniṣad in the next post that can assist us.
Vighnarāja (or gaṇeśa as the king of obstacles) is the one to remove this blemish.


Abhimana-asura is attachment. Note it is two words combined abhi +mana. Abhi signifies intensity + mana is manas. Manas we know as the 'mind' connected to the senses. It is completely distinct from ātman, belonging only to the body. Hence Abhimana is 'intensely the body-sense' . That is, connected and attached to the notion I am this body. From this notion'attachment' happens, I am this body, these senses.
It is dhūmravarṇa (gaṇeśa as the smoky-grey in color) that removes this notion.
Note the last two blemishes. They are the 'personalities' of ahaṁkāra and mamakāra. ahaṁkāra is 'I maker' and māmakāra is 'mine or me maker'. It is centered in 'me'ness the ego of individual self. It is the notion that I am self or ahaṁkāra, ego the small self vs. SELF, the ātma, expansion of Being, of fullness (bhūman).

And from where does all this mischief arise from? The root of all these afflictions? The feeling , thought , emotion 'I am not enough'. I am missing something, I am not possessing something, feeling whole. Why else would one want something in excess?

What is one to do? and what does the maitreyopaniṣad tell us about possessions and ownership? Lets look at that in the next post.

praṇām

yajvan
02 December 2009, 11:41 AM
hariḥ oṁ
~~~~~~

oṁ gajavaktraṁ namaḥ
ॐ गजवक्त्रं हमः


Namasté,

The 1st post reviewed the aṣṭa vināyaka avatāra ( the 8 avatār-s of gaṇeśa) and their alignment to the 8 blemishes of ignorance the individual may possess in varying degrees.

To the detail-minded reader, they may have seen 7 out of 8 blemishes have the sound 'ma' or 'ka' associated with them. The definition of ma is 'me' ( amongst other things); and this 'ka' found in the 4th definition is a taddhita. That is, affixed to form and adjective or a noun. In this 4th use, it expresses diminution ( lessening) Or . Say we use this 'ka' with the word asvaka. This means a 'bad' horse. Note this 'ka' also can be applied to the highest quality of splendor and light, yet also can be applied as just discussed - deterioration or diminution.


We now have ma and ka. If we look at it as 'kama' we find one of the 8 blemishes listed in post one. Kāma then can be the deterioration ( ka) of me (ma). This can be found in Kāma or that excessive thirst-desire for objects of the senses that keeps one bound to the notion 'I am the body' or ahaṁkāra and mamakāra suggested in the last paragraph of post 1. Hence this notion of the sense of possession to desire and capture keeps one bound to ignorance ( other then their true Self).


Back to the question posed - what do we really own ? We think we own something because we have a receipt for its purchase. Yet the maitreya upaniṣad offers us another POV. Here is the story.

King Brihadratha decided to go to the forest for saṁyas ( withdrawal from social life for spiritual pursuits). He prepares his son for the kingdom, and then retires to the forest. Upon doing tapas for some time, the sage Sakayanya muni comes to him (like a fire without smoke as the story goes). This muni departs the wisdom of Lord Maitreya, the same way as it was given to Sakayanya from the Lord, and that is the knowledge of the SELF.

He explains the SELF, as pure, unbounded and free from states , steadfast, immutable, untarnished, uneager, desire-less (that is the 3 guna's). Being unmanifest, subtle, invisible, non-object, free from states, non-agent, (but) abides like an agent. He tells the King.

The muni also describes the self (of the ego, boundaries, relative life) , that is attached to fruit of actions. He describes it as white and dark as he calls it 'good and bad' for lack of a better term. Sakayanya says, "Borne alone and defiled by the stream of qualities, unsteady, wavering, bewildered, full of desire, distracted, one goes on into the state of self-conceit in thinking, 'This is I' and 'That is mine' one binds himself with himself , as does a bird with a snare."

We look to this world and it is made up of the 5 tattva's ( earth, air, fire, water and space). Where have we created any of these elements to say we possess the right to call them our own?

Yet the argument - what of a home? I purchased it, and all the tattva's reside there. Isn't it 'mine' ? All of these elements come from our good earth, and that has come from our sun. And our sun they say is perhaps a 4th to 7th generation sun that collected all these elements from past sun's that exploded. All these things come together to offer us the home, its bricks, windows, and the body we have. All of this has been in the making for billions of years out there in ākāśa, in space. Where have we created one atom in our contribution of this Universe? How may one look at possessions then?

For me, I would look to the īśopaniṣad or īśāvāsya upaniṣad, the 1st śloka says, īśāvāsyāmidam sarvam, that this whole world (world here = total of all) is completely (sarva) covered/pervaded metered out by Him. The beauty of this statement is found in its words:


īśāvāsya ईशावास्य is ' to be clothed or pervaded by the Supreme'
āmi आमिis ā + mi ; ā is a conjunctive particle ( a connection to the next word) meaning 'moreover, further' + mi is to meter out , measure.
From this we have 'the Supreme pervades and furthermore meters out' .
The Supreme is defined in īś ईश्- to rule, to be master of, and īśā is power, dominion. The Supreme is the ruler, master, Lord and has dominion and power over all (sarva) that is covered and metered out by īśāvara.

Hence who 'owns' all is īśāvara; of what part can we say we own, until we associate completely with the Divine?


praṇām

yajvan
17 January 2010, 12:06 AM
hariḥ oṁ
~~~~~~

oṁ gajavaktraṁ namaḥ
ॐ गजवक्त्रं हमः

Namasté


mūṣikavāhanaya is gaṇeśa-ji, the One that rides (or has a vehicle) a mouse or mūṣika; vāhana means 'carrying'. This we know.


I thought to add some additional ideas on this notion of the mouse. It is a mouse or is there something deeper that is there?

mūṣaka - a mouse, rat; also a thief, a plunderer. This is what the mouse/rat does , it steals and plunders. It is from the root word mūṣ 'stealer, thief'. And mū is binding , tying , fixing.

At times this mūṣaka is also another name/symbol for the SELF. How so? It is the notion of mū, as if it ( the SELF) is bound to this world of diversity. It is (as if) its freedom is stolen (mūṣ) by diversity, by the multiplicity of creation, yet at all times it is free , but forgets.

Now add rati - mūṣaka+rati ; rati is defined as pleasure , enjoyment , delight in , fondness . This rati can be looked at as ra+ti ; ra is rooted in rā , acquiring, possessing; as a noun it is splendor, brightness.

We have the notion of that which delights (rati) in the Self (mūṣaka); we also have that which possesses (rā) the Self (mūṣaka). Who is that? the muni - a saint , sage , seer, but more importantly , the realized person. The exponent of Reality.

The muni is rooted in 'man' - what is 'man' ? to perceive,observe , learn , know , understand , comprehend. What does the muni know? The Self - mūṣaka. And what does s/he delight (rati) in? The Self (mūṣaka).

Hence another name for a muni is mūṣakarati (mūṣaka+rati) - one that delights, finds fondness, and is possessed (rā) of the Self.

So, another symbol of gaṇeśa-ji, the Divine, riding on the vehicle ( vāhana ) of the Self (mūṣaka), and the Realized Being ( the muni) taking gaṇeśa-ji everywhere s/he goes ( possessed of the SELF).

praṇām

shian
12 April 2012, 11:55 PM
Great Thread, i love this
Thank you :)

lovely form of Bhagavan
this study of Holy Names will purify, removed sins
When we meditate and think about Lord Ganesh, we will realise that Lord is always with us, always lovely, give peace, so He get special respect from all sect and even religion. Amazing way from Shiva - Shakti to guide all.

Jaya Ganesha Jaya Ganesha Pahimam Sarva Sattvanam Ca