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Sudarshan
25 September 2006, 01:24 PM
On other forums, muslims use a strange proof for the quran, and call it the quran magic. They claim that certain verses in quran cannot be produced by a human author due to their unique style. This is in the Arabic language which Hindus cannot objectively evaluate.

However, we should note that some of our Hindu writers in sanskrit have shown such unique skills that would be very hard even for great poets. One such work was compiled by the Srivaishnavite scholar named Arasanippalai Sri Veknkatadvari Kavi, and the work is titled the Raghava Yadaveeyam.

The unique feature about this composition is that it is a 30 verse composition, and has for its subject the stories of Rama and Krishna simultaneously. When read from verse 1-30, it is Ramayana, and when every verse is read in reverse, the same thirty verses constitute the stoery of Krishna. This type of construction is known as anuloma pratiloma yamakam, and is a very rare skill among poets.

It is a rare ability for a poet to compose a verse that is backwards readable sensibly.
It is even rarer when both readings have predefined subjects.
When thirty such verses are stringed together to form a work, what do I say??

A link to this work http://sanskrit.gde.to/all_pdf/raaghavayaadaviya.pdf

There are some other works like these in sanskrit literature.


A counter challenge is therefore issued to muslims to produce thirty verses like these(in any language you like), and dealing with two different topics simultaneously. In the absence of that the "quran magic" claim is rendered invalid.

Znanna
25 September 2006, 07:51 PM
Sounds like the Bible Codes, embedded numerological structure within the texts.

Some poets are like this too, Blake, for example and Shakespeare, too.

Inspired writings are, well, inspired.

:)



ZN

sarabhanga
25 September 2006, 08:44 PM
There are some other works like these in sanskrit literature.

Indeed, the whole of the Veda Samhita is such an opus!

The standard (continuous text, after saMdhi) form of the veda is known as the saMhitApATha. And it is derived from the padapATha, in which the parts are considered separately (without saMdhi) in regular sequence. And then there are various defined patterns of recitation, beginning with the simple step-wise kramapATha and culminating in the elaborately woven gaNapATha. There are (at least) five different modes of recitation, and every case derives true words and reveals self-consistent meanings!

For example:

saMhitApATha ~ 12345678
padapATha ~ 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8,
kramapATha ~ 12, 23, 34, 45, 56, 67, 78,
jaTApATha ~ 122112, 233223, 344334, 455445, 566556, 677667, 788778,
gaNapATha ~ 1221123321123, 2332234432234, 3443345543345, 4554456654456, 5665567765567, 67766788776678,

The ekAdasha saMhitAprakAra provides eleven methods, including also: mAlApATha, shikhApATha, lekhApATha, dhvajapATha, daNDapATha, and rathapATha.

If even one letter of the saMhitA is altered, or a single syllable is added or omitted, the error soon becomes obvious, and by this science of poetic elaboration and analysis the Veda has been accurately transmitted from generation to generation over thousands of years.

And the enormous difficulty in properly translating such verses into any other language should be obvious.

Sudarshan
26 September 2006, 04:39 AM
Sounds like the Bible Codes, embedded numerological structure within the texts.

Some poets are like this too, Blake, for example and Shakespeare, too.

Inspired writings are, well, inspired.

:)



ZN

Indeed, authors have stated openly that it was revealed by God...

For eg:

1. Take the kankaNa Ramayana:
KankaNa Ramayana is just one single verse of 32 syllables. You can take any single syllable as the first, and use the next 31 in a cyclic fashion to get 32 verses. These 32 verses form Ramayana.

2. Take this shloka from Srimad Vedanta Desika:

yayayayayayayayayayayayayayayaya
yayayayayayayayayayayayayayayaya ( pAduka sahasram)

which is a verse with a single syllable "ya".

3. Take this shloka from Srimad Vedanta Desika:

nananananananananananananananana
nananananananananananananananana (yAdavabyudayam)

again a verse formed from a single syllable 'na'.

4. mAgham gives many such..




The list can go on...

Bishawjit
04 April 2009, 09:42 AM
Koran's poetry is hard to imitate not because Allah sent it. it is because Koran was written in primitive ambiguous 7th century Arabic. I am sure even the native Arabs have difficulty understanding it properly let alone others.

rcscwc
28 February 2010, 05:04 AM
Koran's poetry is hard to imitate not because Allah sent it. it is because Koran was written in primitive ambiguous 7th century Arabic. I am sure even the native Arabs have difficulty understanding it properly let alone others.
Come to think. Harappa script is so unique none has read it so far!! Hmmm. Work of God?

As for bad language. Ghalib was a poet of bad Persian. Hence his poems are incomprehensible.

charlebs
06 April 2011, 08:59 AM
Koran's poetry is hard to imitate not because Allah sent it. it is because Koran was written in primitive ambiguous 7th century Arabic. I am sure even the native Arabs have difficulty understanding it properly let alone others.
I believe Indra sent it, but muhammed could not grasp any of it, so he just used his own knowledge and wisdom he acquired along the way of living with ego.
well maybe he was just too inspired by other religions and the hearsay of people. he even argued with the jewish that there were luck godesses. it was more a race for survival, and he won whatever he could win.

unfortunately barbaric countries went back to their old ways and copied the prophet in ways that were only suitable and thought out for him to protect himself and his women.
Aisha got tempted once and it took Allah's intervention for her not to be beheaded.