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TTCUSM
25 November 2010, 04:12 PM
Vanakkam Everyone,

During my sophomore year in high school, I took a course on World History, and we used a textbook titled The Earth and Its Peoples. I did some Googling, and found a PDF version (http://www.owasso.k12.ok.us/webpages/gyankey/files/Earth%20and%20Its%20Peoples%20Ch%2006.pdf) of their chapter on India and Southeast Asia. This covers the entire history of Sanatana Dharma, from the Vedic Period to the Gupta Empire.

Eastern Mind
25 November 2010, 05:10 PM
Vannakkam YYCUSM: Just wondering ...

What was the ethnicity/world view of the author/authors? (Eurocentric?)

What language was it written in? (I'm guessing English?) If so, how does this demonstrate, bias?

Where did the religious, cultural, or geographic bias mainly fall? (Don't fool yourself. There is ALWAYS bias.)

Who was the intended audience?

Why was the book written?

Which humans and ethnic groups were not considered, and which were given more attention that would probably be seen as fair?

(Just as an example, often 'comparative religion' books or classed will take Christianity apart with its various denominations, and then have one small chapter on 'Eastern faiths' at the back.

I feel these are fair questions to ask before reading any herstory book.

Aum Namasivaya

Believer
25 November 2010, 05:28 PM
It is always enlightening to learn different POVs. Our esteemed guests expose us to so much new material about ourselves. What a treat. I am so thankful to them for pointing us in this direction and helping us increase our awareness. It indeed is a joy to read about SD from birth, to infancy, through adolescence to adulthood. What a glorious account!

Then again, I might change my opinion on the whole thing, if I actually read the write-up at the link provided.

Adhvagat
25 November 2010, 07:28 PM
Believer, sometimes I really don't know when you're being sarcastic.

TTCUSM
25 November 2010, 07:52 PM
Vannakkam YYCUSM: Just wondering ...

What was the ethnicity/world view of the author/authors? (Eurocentric?)

What language was it written in? (I'm guessing English?) If so, how does this demonstrate, bias?

Where did the religious, cultural, or geographic bias mainly fall? (Don't fool yourself. There is ALWAYS bias.)

Who was the intended audience?

Why was the book written?

Which humans and ethnic groups were not considered, and which were given more attention that would probably be seen as fair?

(Just as an example, often 'comparative religion' books or classed will take Christianity apart with its various denominations, and then have one small chapter on 'Eastern faiths' at the back.

I feel these are fair questions to ask before reading any herstory book.

Aum Namasivaya

Thiru Eastern Mind,

This chapter comes from a history textbook that is widely used in American schools. When I took history in high school, I eagerly flipped to the chapter on "Ancient India" to see what Western historians were writing about us. I was shocked to learn that Western accounts of Hindu history were vastly different from my own ideas about Hindu history.

Then again, my ideas about Hindu history were mostly shaped by what I saw on TV serials of the Ramayana and Mahabharata...

satay
25 November 2010, 08:35 PM
namaste,



Then again, my ideas about Hindu history were mostly shaped by what I saw on TV serials of the Ramayana and Mahabharata...

Any idea how 'western accounts' of Hindu history were shaped?




Migration of Indo-European peoples
into northwest India
ca. 1000 B.C.E. Indo-European groups move into the...

The theory of migrating europeans has been debunked. No one buys that nonsense now a days.

saidevo
25 November 2010, 09:01 PM
namaste TTCUSM.



Then again, my ideas about Hindu history were mostly shaped by what I saw on TV serials of the Ramayana and Mahabharata...


Shape it further by reading about it such links as:
http://www.encyclopediaofauthentichinduism.org/articles/53_chronological_chart.htm
http://www.encyclopediaofauthentichinduism.org/articles/53.3.htm

so you can counter any nonsense that you happen to face about Hindu history, dharma and culture.

TTCUSM
26 November 2010, 12:37 PM
namaste TTCUSM.



Shape it further by reading about it such links as:
http://www.encyclopediaofauthentichinduism.org/articles/53_chronological_chart.htm
http://www.encyclopediaofauthentichinduism.org/articles/53.3.htm

so you can counter any nonsense that you happen to face about Hindu history, dharma and culture.

Thiru Saidevo,

I am very well aware of the fact that Western accounts of Hindu history are inaccurate. However, I still believe that it would be a good idea for us to read them. That way, we won't get any surprises when dealing with non-Hindus.

Eastern Mind
26 November 2010, 02:27 PM
I am very well aware of the fact that Western accounts of Hindu history are inaccurate.

Vannakkam TTCUSM: This is exactly the reason why I wouldn't read them if I have prior knowledge of the bias. Whether you like it or not, some of what you read sinks in. This is just the way the mind operates. So there is a weakening of the mind. It works just like the cancer of Christianity in India. Slowly, but surely. There is first a foothold in the door such as a small doubt in the existence of our Gods. You plant a seed and it grows. That's how evangelism works, and its a well thought out tactic. First learn the language, then dress like those who are to be conquered. It's slow and insiduous, tricky and deceptive. Reading alternative and negative history is exactly the same tactic. We need to print a few million copies of magazines like Hinduism Today in all the major languages of India. We also need to print a few million copies of pamphlets that glorify Hinduism for what it is: the greatest, oldest, purest, most amazingingly peaceful philosophy and way of life on the planet. We need a few million more entitled "Beware the Missionaries Deceptive Tactics!" The lowering of the eyes, and saying "I'm a Hindu," in some ashamed way has to stop. Stand up and be proud instead of trying to find 'other' foreign ideas like alternative histories written by those who are a threat, that incringe on this beauty. We should all say "I'm a Hindu!" in a similar outward expression as the pompous lawyer who does it because he's actually insecure, but with us its because we KNOW in our hearts that the Truth is inside.

Aum Namasivaya

Believer
26 November 2010, 05:54 PM
The lowering of the eyes, and saying "I'm a Hindu," in some ashamed way has to stop.

+1

That will not happen until we stop this misconceived notion of 'all paths lead to the same God' and other frivolous junk that goes with this thinking. This drags Hinduism down to the same level as some other dictatorial social control creeds, which in some circles pass as 'religions'. As much as I respect and adore our Hindu Acharyas, some of them become unwitting enablers for foreign missionaries to trample us, by softening Hinduism for them. In their personal quest for spirituality; the greater good of all Hindus and the good of the Hindu nation is totally ignored. Is it selfishness? Who knows, but it sure is not visible to the practitioner, for he is too busy after his personal liberation. That leaves every man and woman to fend for him/her-self. Oh my dear/respected Acharyas, why are you leaving the common man behind? Or, maybe the common man is not ready for them yet.

TTCUSM
27 November 2010, 01:27 PM
Vannakkam TTCUSM: This is exactly the reason why I wouldn't read them if I have prior knowledge of the bias. Whether you like it or not, some of what you read sinks in. This is just the way the mind operates. So there is a weakening of the mind.

Thiru Eastern Mind,

I still think it's a good idea to learn the viewpoint of Western historians. That way, we won't get surprised when speaking with non-Hindus about our history.


It works just like the cancer of Christianity in India. Slowly, but surely. There is first a foothold in the door such as a small doubt in the existence of our Gods. You plant a seed and it grows. That's how evangelism works, and its a well thought out tactic. First learn the language, then dress like those who are to be conquered. It's slow and insiduous, tricky and deceptive. Reading alternative and negative history is exactly the same tactic. We need to print a few million copies of magazines like Hinduism Today in all the major languages of India. We also need to print a few million copies of pamphlets that glorify Hinduism for what it is: the greatest, oldest, purest, most amazingingly peaceful philosophy and way of life on the planet. We need a few million more entitled "Beware the Missionaries Deceptive Tactics!"

I think you broke one of the forum rules by referring to Christianity as a "cancer". Please don't be so hard on the missionaries-- after all, Hindu groups like ISKCON do similar things in the West.


The lowering of the eyes, and saying "I'm a Hindu," in some ashamed way has to stop. Stand up and be proud instead of trying to find 'other' foreign ideas like alternative histories written by those who are a threat, that incringe on this beauty. We should all say "I'm a Hindu!" in a similar outward expression as the pompous lawyer who does it because he's actually insecure, but with us its because we KNOW in our hearts that the Truth is inside.

I agree with you there.

Eastern Mind
27 November 2010, 02:21 PM
Vannakkam TTCUSM:

Seriously, if you feel my or anyone else's posts are breaking the rules, please just inform the moderator.

Aum Namasivaya

Eastern Mind
28 November 2010, 08:53 AM
Vannakkaam: Here's another recent article on the subject.

http://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper/tp-national/tp-newdelhi/article914350.ece

Aum Namasivaya

TatTvamAsi
28 November 2010, 02:43 PM
Thiru Eastern Mind,

I still think it's a good idea to learn the viewpoint of Western historians. That way, we won't get surprised when speaking with non-Hindus about our history.



I think you broke one of the forum rules by referring to Christianity as a "cancer". Please don't be so hard on the missionaries-- after all, Hindu groups like ISKCON do similar things in the West.



I agree with you there.

Are you mad?

christianity = islam = judaism = ABSOLUTE GARBAGE. They are most certainly a cancer on humanity and we Hindus don't want anything to do with those worthless untouchables.

And western historians' perspectives on India/Hinduism should be read only if american schools start teaching american history written by the taliban and palestine. Don't they need a different viewpoint also? To counter them just in case as you say? :rolleyes:

Ramakrishna
29 November 2010, 01:22 AM
Namaste all,

As an amateur historian and a student of history, I find this thread very intriguing. The whole issue of bias in history is something that I never paid much attention to. But I need to, both as a historian and more importantly as a member of a culture and religion that has been portrayed with much untruthfulness and bias throughout the world.


Vannakkam YYCUSM: Just wondering ...

What was the ethnicity/world view of the author/authors? (Eurocentric?)

What language was it written in? (I'm guessing English?) If so, how does this demonstrate, bias?

Where did the religious, cultural, or geographic bias mainly fall? (Don't fool yourself. There is ALWAYS bias.)

Who was the intended audience?

Why was the book written?

Which humans and ethnic groups were not considered, and which were given more attention that would probably be seen as fair?

(Just as an example, often 'comparative religion' books or classed will take Christianity apart with its various denominations, and then have one small chapter on 'Eastern faiths' at the back.

I feel these are fair questions to ask before reading any herstory book.

Aum Namasivaya

These are all extremely important questions that should be answered when reading any type of history.



And western historians' perspectives on India/Hinduism should be read only if american schools start teaching american history written by the taliban and palestine. Don't they need a different viewpoint also? To counter them just in case as you say? :rolleyes:

Excellent point!!

Jai Sri Krishna

Eastern Mind
29 November 2010, 08:02 AM
Vannakkam Ramakrishna et al:

I find it sad that some people view the written word as truth. I did my best as a teacher to remind my students to always read between the lines. Its not just with history either, but with current news reports, political statememts, etc.. basically any non-fiction. Even fiction, (Narnia, for example) often had bias.

I was in Hawaii a few weeks back and overheard a conversation about when Hawaii joined the US. A native Hawaiian adamantly corrected it to be , "You mean when the US annexed, and took over Hawaii!"

But its a very difficult task to find answers to my original questions. I'm also surprised no one has mentioned my use of the term her story near the end, because that;s another half of the population often left out of our recollections of what happened. In wars, for example, that half left at home also have a very sad (not always) story to tell.

Aum Namasivaya

Rationalist
19 December 2010, 03:17 PM
Vanakkam Everyone,

During my sophomore year in high school, I took a course on World History, and we used a textbook titled The Earth and Its Peoples. I did some Googling, and found a PDF version (http://www.owasso.k12.ok.us/webpages/gyankey/files/Earth%20and%20Its%20Peoples%20Ch%2006.pdf) of their chapter on India and Southeast Asia. This covers the entire history of Sanatana Dharma, from the Vedic Period to the Gupta Empire.

I remember that book (and the fact that I got a 5 on the AP exam). It actually has very good information on every other country/civilization except for India. The book's information on India however is a slightly less offensive Christian propaganda version of Indian history.