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brahman
08 February 2011, 05:15 AM
Hinduism is the indigenous religious tradition of the Indian Subcontinent including Pakistan. However subsequent to the creation of Pakistan in 1947 as a Muslim majority nation Hindus have had a much smaller numerical presence here. Nonetheless Hindus have played a major role in the history, culture and politics of the country.

In terms of population, Pakistan now has thefifth largest population of Hindus which is quickly declining.
In August 1947, at the end of British Raj, the population percentage of Hindus in what is today in Pakistan was perhaps as high as 15-20%, but would drop to its current total of less than 2% in the years since independence. According to the 1998 Pakistan Census, caste Hindus constitute about 1.6 percent of the total population of Pakistan and about 6.6% in province of Sindh. The Pakistan Census separates Schedule Castes from the main body of Hindus who make up a further 0.25% of national population.

PAKISTAN POPULATION 132,352,000 HINDU POPULATION 2,443,614 HINDU POPULATION PERCENTAGE 1.846%

The increasing Islamisation of Pakistan and antagonism against India, a nation with a Hindu majority, has been an influential factor in the persecution of religious minorities, among those minorities, Hindus. Such Islamisation include the blasphemy laws, which make it dangerous for religious minorities to express themselves freely and engage freely in religious and cultural activities. The promulgation of Sharia, Quranic law has also increased the marginalisation of Hindus and other minorities. Following the Babri Mosque riots in India, riots and attacks on Hindus in retaliation has only increased; Hindus in Pakistan are routinely affected by communal incidents in India and violent developments on the Kashmir conflict between the two nations. It remains the hope of many that a permanent peace between the two nations will go a long way in making life better for the roughly 3 million Hindus living in Pakistan. The 1998 census recorded 2,443,614 Hindus in Pakistan.
Also, Hindu minorities, under Taliban rule in Swat, were forced to wear Red headgear such as turbans as a symbol of dhimmi.
In July 2010, around 60 members of the minority Hindus in Karachi were attacked and ethnically cleansed following an incident when a Hindu youth drank from a water tap near an Islamic mosque.

List of Hindu temples in Pakistan (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Hindu_temples_in_Pakistan)

Sources: Various (http://www.google.co.in/search?hl=en&source=hp&q=hinduism+in+pakistan&aq=f&aqi=&aql=&oq=)

Ramakrishna
08 February 2011, 10:15 PM
Namaste,

How sad. I've heard that since the partition, the population of Hindus in Pakistan has gone down (obviously) and the population of Muslims in India has gone up. What does that say about how each country treats its minorities?

Jai Sri Ram

Rationalist
12 February 2011, 09:53 PM
Hinduism is the indigenous religious tradition of the Indian Subcontinent including Pakistan. However subsequent to the creation of Pakistan in 1947 as a Muslim majority nation Hindus have had a much smaller numerical presence here. Nonetheless Hindus have played a major role in the history, culture and politics of the country.

In terms of population, Pakistan now has thefifth largest population of Hindus which is quickly declining.
In August 1947, at the end of British Raj, the population percentage of Hindus in what is today in Pakistan was perhaps as high as 15-20%, but would drop to its current total of less than 2% in the years since independence. According to the 1998 Pakistan Census, caste Hindus constitute about 1.6 percent of the total population of Pakistan and about 6.6% in province of Sindh. The Pakistan Census separates Schedule Castes from the main body of Hindus who make up a further 0.25% of national population.

PAKISTAN POPULATION 132,352,000 HINDU POPULATION 2,443,614 HINDU POPULATION PERCENTAGE 1.846%

The increasing Islamisation of Pakistan and antagonism against India, a nation with a Hindu majority, has been an influential factor in the persecution of religious minorities, among those minorities, Hindus. Such Islamisation include the blasphemy laws, which make it dangerous for religious minorities to express themselves freely and engage freely in religious and cultural activities. The promulgation of Sharia, Quranic law has also increased the marginalisation of Hindus and other minorities. Following the Babri Mosque riots in India, riots and attacks on Hindus in retaliation has only increased; Hindus in Pakistan are routinely affected by communal incidents in India and violent developments on the Kashmir conflict between the two nations. It remains the hope of many that a permanent peace between the two nations will go a long way in making life better for the roughly 3 million Hindus living in Pakistan. The 1998 census recorded 2,443,614 Hindus in Pakistan.
Also, Hindu minorities, under Taliban rule in Swat, were forced to wear Red headgear such as turbans as a symbol of dhimmi.
In July 2010, around 60 members of the minority Hindus in Karachi were attacked and ethnically cleansed following an incident when a Hindu youth drank from a water tap near an Islamic mosque.

List of Hindu temples in Pakistan (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Hindu_temples_in_Pakistan)

Sources: Various (http://www.google.co.in/search?hl=en&source=hp&q=hinduism+in+pakistan&aq=f&aqi=&aql=&oq=)


Oh, but where did all the Hindus go? Surely our Islamic brothers treated them well? Its ok though; after all, it is alright to denounce the Hindu reprisal acts against Christians and Muslims while ignoring the daily genocide of Hindus in Pakistan! Who cares about a pagan anyway?

I honestly feel that we should never have given the land we won in that war back to the Muslims. We should have driven all the mongrels back <<< way to their precious stone idol.

brahman
14 March 2011, 06:08 AM
Dear Members,

We consider our life to be wonderful. But when we look around us, we see our brethren within our reach, struggling under the grab of religion .Only the imposition of an official boundary separated us. While we live in happiness; conflict and unrest and chaos still persist there. It is evident they too are part of the largest civilization in the world, but are now being subject to disorder.

Saving religion is a Kshatriya Dharma for sure: I am not against one’s Karma. We should not protect ourselves by destroying others:

instead concentrate our energies towards the vision of empowerment,

on achieving intellectual harmony,

and foster profound co-ordination of the so-called lower and upper communities.

This co-ordination should restrict selfishness. Otherwise, you are a prisoner to your little circle of thought, where you have no real love for your brethren.

It will be deplorable to search and make someone virtuous by renouncing those who have bravely adhered to you. All this brings the finding that we are not made for creating anarchy and unhappiness and despair, which are needless things in life.

In this forum, let us grow our common space for respecting, recognizing, remembering all those accurate and clear perceptions towards truth, listen wholeheartedly to their problems, and become tolerant enough to pray for all. Lots of Love:)