Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: Changed by following the Hindu religion?

  1. #1

    Changed by following the Hindu religion?

    John Hick gives the following view of salvation:

    "mean by salvation something concrete, something that can take place progressively in peoples lives, something that is meant to begin here and now in this life and to make a manifest difference. We can describe it as the gradual transformation of men and women from natural self-centredness to a new orientation centred in the divine reality that we call God, liberating us into love and compassion for our fellow beings. On this view it is those who love their neighbours; who have compassion - that is feeling with and for others, - and who give something of their time, energy, intelligence, resources to those in much greater need both far and near, who are on the path of salvation."

    Would Hindus, or some Hindus, be able to agree with that kind of view?

    Does Hinduism change people? Transform them?

    If it does, would you say:

    (1) Hindus are transformed through their own efforts. They are changed through their own works and spiritual practices.

    (2) Hindus are transformed by the grace of God. It is God that does the work to change people.

    (3) Hindus are transformed by the grace of God, but certain things like praying or worship can help with the process.

    (4) Some other option that you can think of.


    Thank you.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    July 2012
    Age
    52
    Posts
    2,089
    Rep Power
    2641

    Re: Changed by following the Hindu religion?

    Namaste,

    John Hick seems to have given a wonderful definition for Hinduism and salvation. It is indeed only those with compassion that can rise up to great spiritual heights, something like everyone else, I am also working towards.

    With regards to the specific view on Hindus' spiritual practices, I believe in option #2, that is:

    (2) Hindus are transformed by the grace of God. It is God that does the work to change people.

    Pranam.
    Last edited by Viraja; 08 August 2013 at 07:46 AM.
    jai hanuman gyan gun sagar jai kapis tihu lok ujagar

  3. #3

    Re: Changed by following the Hindu religion?

    delete
    Last edited by Sudas Paijavana; 17 January 2014 at 08:28 PM.

  4. #4

    Re: Changed by following the Hindu religion?

    On this topic, Sri Ramakrishna Paramahansa gave a wonderful metaphor. He said that the wind (of the divine grace) is always blowing, but it is up to us to raise our sail and catch the wind, which will then carry our boat where it needs to go.

    There are many different Hindu schools of thought, some of which give greater emphasis to divine grace and some of which give greater emphasis to personal effort. My sense is that most Hindus would agree that both play some role in the process of our spiritual transformation. The Lord's compassion is essential and is open to all, but we must practice our sādhana in order to experience it. To use another metaphor (from Paramahansa Yogananda), the Lord is always broadcasting, but we need to tune our radio (through sādhana and dharmic living) in order to receive the signal.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    July 2012
    Age
    52
    Posts
    2,089
    Rep Power
    2641

    Re: Changed by following the Hindu religion?

    Quote Originally Posted by Sudas Paijavana View Post
    John Hancock is not John Hick. And, neither of them are pious enough to be deserved the prefix of "Shri", nor are they Hindus.
    Sorry, I fixed it.
    jai hanuman gyan gun sagar jai kapis tihu lok ujagar

  6. #6
    Join Date
    July 2012
    Age
    52
    Posts
    2,089
    Rep Power
    2641

    Re: Changed by following the Hindu religion?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeffery D. Long View Post
    On this topic, Sri Ramakrishna Paramahansa gave a wonderful metaphor. He said that the wind (of the divine grace) is always blowing, but it is up to us to raise our sail and catch the wind, which will then carry our boat where it needs to go.

    There are many different Hindu schools of thought, some of which give greater emphasis to divine grace and some of which give greater emphasis to personal effort. My sense is that most Hindus would agree that both play some role in the process of our spiritual transformation. The Lord's compassion is essential and is open to all, but we must practice our sādhana in order to experience it. To use another metaphor (from Paramahansa Yogananda), the Lord is always broadcasting, but we need to tune our radio (through sādhana and dharmic living) in order to receive the signal.
    Namaste Jeffery ji,

    I agree with what you are saying. However I firmly believe that even one's spiritual sadhana is not one's own - meaning, even the effort put into the sadhana secretly has god's will in its behind - we see so many people dying in young age with ailments such as Cancer, etc. Some of the Hindus are so motivated in doing the pariharas, however prolonged the course is, and do succeed in getting out of their illness/difficulty, but far too many are those who will not resort into doing pariharas of any kind. This has made me wonder that even doing sadhana and pariharas are stimulated by god's will and never a man's own doing!

    Pranam.
    jai hanuman gyan gun sagar jai kapis tihu lok ujagar

  7. #7
    Join Date
    July 2012
    Age
    59
    Posts
    639
    Rep Power
    0

    Re: Changed by following the Hindu religion?

    Quote Originally Posted by Decypher View Post
    John Hick gives the following view of salvation:

    "mean by salvation something concrete, something that can take place progressively in people’s lives, something that is meant to begin here and now in this life and to make a manifest difference. We can describe it as the gradual transformation of men and women from natural self-centredness to a new orientation centred in the divine reality that we call God, liberating us into love and compassion for our fellow beings. On this view it is those who love their neighbours; who have compassion - that is feeling with and for others, - and who give something of their time, energy, intelligence, resources to those in much greater need both far and near, who are on the path of salvation."

    Would Hindus, or some Hindus, be able to agree with that kind of view?

    Does Hinduism change people? Transform them?

    If it does, would you say:

    (1) Hindus are transformed through their own efforts. They are changed through their own works and spiritual practices.

    (2) Hindus are transformed by the grace of God. It is God that does the work to change people.

    (3) Hindus are transformed by the grace of God, but certain things like praying or worship can help with the process.

    (4) Some other option that you can think of.


    Thank you.
    Namaste.

    I would say 'D- All Of The Above' but in reality, one thing leads into another.

    Hindus are transformed by their own efforts leading to the Grace of God.

    If there's one 'constant' in every religion out there, it's this concept of 'Grace' and being 'Transformed By Grace'.

    Christians call it 'Grace' (as that's the closest word in the English language to describe it), Hindus call it 'Moksha', Buddhists call it 'Nirvana', Islam call it "Fana".

    Only in the rare occasion does Moksha occur spontaneously through 'the Grace of God'.

    Mostly, we must transform ourselves before we can become fully transformed.

    The Lord helps those who help themselves after all....what do you think the saying means?

    Aum Namah Shivaya

  8. #8
    Join Date
    September 2006
    Age
    71
    Posts
    7,705
    Rep Power
    223

    Re: Changed by following the Hindu religion?

    hari o
    ~~~~~~
    namast




    It seems that people have lost the notion of anugraha (grace) and its relevance within sanātana dharma. It is very important within kaśmir śaivism.
    It is at the core of the paramārthasāra; in essence the work of śeṣa patajali ( some call ādiśeṣa ) consisting of 85 śloka-s and is expanded upon by abhinavagupta within the framework of advitīya (~ non dual~, without a second) kaśmir śaivism.

    When you think 'you' are the doer, then all is done by 'you'. Once you figure out 'you' are an exponent of Him, then one gains clarity of who is doing what, and where this anugraha originates from.

    iti śiva

    1. anugraha - favor , kindness , showing favor , conferring benefits , promoting or furthering a good object = grace
    यतस्त्वं शिवसमोऽसि
    yatastvaṁ śivasamo'si
    because you are identical with śiva

    _

  9. #9
    Join Date
    September 2007
    Location
    Canada
    Age
    70
    Posts
    7,191
    Rep Power
    5038

    Re: Changed by following the Hindu religion?

    Vannakkam: Out here in this mundane world of duality, I go with 3, but ultimately I know it's just choice 2. So in the meantime, I'll stick with 3.

    Aum Namasivaya

  10. #10

    Re: Changed by following the Hindu religion?

    Namaste, Friends,

    There is wisdom in what everyone here has posted, but I think that Viraja, Yajvan, and Eastern Mind have really put the matter well. In many forms of Hinduism--certainly Kashmir Shaivism, the Shakta traditions, and Advaita Vedanta--we begin in the realm of duality, where we can speak of a contrast between the divine (and divine grace) and our own efforts, and where statements like Necromancer's affirmation that "God helps those who help themselves" and Sri Ramakrishna's and Paramahansa Yogananda's admonitions that we "raise our sail" or "tune our radio" make sense. But then, as we progress in the path, the realization arises that we are all but extensions of the divine reality: that the Lord alone is the doer of all action, and we are like the Lord's limbs in the realm of time and space.
    "One who makes a habit of prayer and meditation will easily overcome all difficulties and remain calm and unruffled in the midst of the trials of life." (Holy Mother Sarada Devi)

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Hindu Dharma Websites
    By saidevo in forum Dharma-related Websites
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 01 June 2016, 01:45 PM
  2. Defending Hindu Dharma against the Onslaught of Adharmic Religions
    By saidevo in forum Abrahamic Religions (Closed For Posting)
    Replies: 119
    Last Post: 17 January 2012, 02:38 PM
  3. Julia Roberts: I'm A Hindu, I Don't Believe in Botox
    By BryonMorrigan in forum Canteen
    Replies: 33
    Last Post: 22 September 2010, 09:27 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •