Page 4 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 56

Thread: Why is Buddhism More Accessible in the US

  1. #31
    Join Date
    January 2013
    Age
    40
    Posts
    327
    Rep Power
    596

    Re: Why is Buddhism More Accessible in the US

    Quote Originally Posted by Jaskaran Singh View Post
    There's no requirement for vegetarianism in Buddhism
    anymore :-), if I may. Because even Buddhist monks eat non-veg and I heard that they justify it by saying that only slaughtering is wrong and not eating what is offered to them. I wonder then what problem Gautama Buddha had with slaughtering in yagnas in the first place, who was extremely careful not even to hurt an ant. He could have let them cook his meat.

    So we have so much contrast b/w the Buddha and his followers. Buddha was vegetarian, silent (as not indulging in philosophical debates), meditative. Seeing this drastic difference and with great Hindu Acharyas in 100s walking throughout the land, its an explanation enough for me about the disappearance of Buddhism in India.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jaskaran Singh View Post
    although slaughtering an entire group of people due to a distasteful depiction of Buddha is extremely adhārmika and goes against Hindu, Jaina, and Bauddha beliefs.
    I would agree. Yet the picture of Buddhist that reaches the Hollywood (to the point of the thread) is being ever peaceful, meditative, nonviolent. While with Hinduism only poverty, superstition etc. manage to reach there.

    Agreeing that it is against the tenets of Buddhism, it seems to have spread a lot by political alliance, conversions etc. And also there seems to have been lack of individuals, unlike in the Hinduism, with divine powers to be able to revive it in India.

    No doubt our India has been enriched with the existence Hindu/Buddhist and Jaina traditions. I wish that positives of all these reach the west.

  2. #32

    Re: Why is Buddhism More Accessible in the US

    Quote Originally Posted by jignyAsu View Post
    Buddha was vegetarian...
    Namaste,

    Didn't he die from choking on pig's meat? Something to do with a bone being stuck in his throat?

  3. #33

    Re: Why is Buddhism More Accessible in the US

    Buddhist monks are required to accept anything that they are given to eat, whether vegetarian or non-vegetarian. They are forbidden, though, to ask for any particular type of food, and if they are aware that an animal is to be killed specifically for them, they are required to refuse that and save the life of the animal. If a householder already has meat sitting around, though, and gives it to Buddhist monks, they are to accept it without complaint. The focus is not ahiṃsā in this situation so much as vairāgya with regard to food.

    The Buddha was, according to the Pali scriptures, given meat which had gone bad and died of food poisoning. So he did not choke on a bone. The householder who gave it to him was apparently horrified at what he had done, but the Buddha forgave him, pointing out that the body is in any case impermanent.

    Quote Originally Posted by jignyAsu View Post
    No doubt our India has been enriched with the existence Hindu/Buddhist and Jaina traditions. I wish that positives of all these reach the west.
    I see this as my mission in life! I have studied Buddhism and Jainism at least as much as I have Hindu traditions, though my heart and soul are with Hinduism. A non-theistic tradition, for me, is incomplete, however much beneficial wisdom it may possess.
    "One who makes a habit of prayer and meditation will easily overcome all difficulties and remain calm and unruffled in the midst of the trials of life." (Holy Mother Sarada Devi)

  4. #34
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    bhUloka
    Posts
    250
    Rep Power
    353

    Re: Why is Buddhism More Accessible in the US

    Quote Originally Posted by Sudas Paijavana View Post
    ...to which you could have simply answered:

    "No, the ones that you are talking about were, in fact, related to the Shramanic traditions, and was an example of Nāstika on Nāstika violence rather than an example of Nāstika on Hindu violence"...

    Jus' sayin', Jas...
    I take pleasure in being unnecessarily long-winded in my responses.
    படைபோர் புக்கு முழங்கும்அப் பாஞ்சசன்னியமும் பல்லாண்டே
    May your pA~nchajanya shankha which reverberates on the battlefield, last thousands upon thousands of years...
    http://archives.mirroroftomorrow.org...anchajanya.jpg

  5. #35
    Join Date
    January 2013
    Age
    40
    Posts
    327
    Rep Power
    596

    Re: Why is Buddhism More Accessible in the US

    Quote Originally Posted by Sudas Paijavana View Post
    Namaste,

    Didn't he die from choking on pig's meat? Something to do with a bone being stuck in his throat?
    LOL. There is all kinds of stories associated with his last moments. The versions I hear is he ate pig's flesh offered to him (told as a justification for their non veg habits) or he ate something grown on soil trodden by pigs and so forth.

    I am just not able to reconcile all this with the problems he had with animal sacrifices in yagna. And moreover the butcher alone seems to accountable for meat eating or army alone for a religion that believes in "turning the other cheek".


    Quote Originally Posted by Jeffery D. Long View Post
    I see this as my mission in life! I have studied Buddhism and Jainism at least as much as I have Hindu traditions, though my heart and soul are with Hinduism. A non-theistic tradition, for me, is incomplete, however much beneficial wisdom it may possess.
    +1

  6. #36

    Re: Why is Buddhism More Accessible in the US

    Quote Originally Posted by jignyAsu View Post
    I am just not able to reconcile all this with the problems he had with animal sacrifices in yagna. And moreover the butcher alone seems to accountable for meat eating or army alone for a religion that believes in "turning the other cheek".
    Namaste,

    It never made sense to me either. Double standards, perhaps? It sounds like a Holier Than Thou attitude to me...

    At least it's confirmed, thanks to Dr. Long, that Buddha died from food poisoning caused by consuming meat.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jaskaran Singh View Post
    I take pleasure in being unnecessarily long-winded in my responses.
    Namaste,


  7. #37
    Join Date
    January 2010
    Location
    Vakrati, Sundara Nadi
    Posts
    115
    Rep Power
    93

    Re: Why is Buddhism More Accessible in the US

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeffery D. Long View Post
    Buddhist monks are required to accept anything that they are given to eat, whether vegetarian or non-vegetarian. They are forbidden, though, to ask for any particular type of food, and if they are aware that an animal is to be killed specifically for them, they are required to refuse that and save the life of the animal. If a householder already has meat sitting around, though, and gives it to Buddhist monks, they are to accept it without complaint. The focus is not ahiṃsā in this situation so much as vairāgya with regard to food.
    I believe at least some Chan monks do inform householders that eating meat (from the almsbowl) would violate the precept against killing.
    "Everybody wants to see God but nobody wants to do any sadhana." -- Swami Sivananda
    "You can advance only through karma yoga; by karma yoga you may benefit others also....Only hard work can make a person powerful and energetic." -- Haidakhan Babaji
    "Do everything you do as Śivathondu." -- Yogaswami

  8. #38
    Join Date
    January 2010
    Location
    Vakrati, Sundara Nadi
    Posts
    115
    Rep Power
    93

    Re: Why is Buddhism More Accessible in the US

    Quote Originally Posted by jignyAsu View Post
    I am just not able to reconcile all this with the problems he had with animal sacrifices in yagna. And moreover the butcher alone seems to accountable for meat eating or army alone for a religion that believes in "turning the other cheek".
    The Buddha may have been trying to thread a 'middle path' between an asceticism that tries to eliminate every conceivable form of killing (as found in ascetic Jainism) and a sacrificial culture in which paśuyajna was deemed necessary for relationship with the devas.
    "Everybody wants to see God but nobody wants to do any sadhana." -- Swami Sivananda
    "You can advance only through karma yoga; by karma yoga you may benefit others also....Only hard work can make a person powerful and energetic." -- Haidakhan Babaji
    "Do everything you do as Śivathondu." -- Yogaswami

  9. #39

    Re: Why is Buddhism More Accessible in the US

    Quote Originally Posted by Jetavan View Post
    I believe at least some Chan monks do inform householders that eating meat (from the almsbowl) would violate the precept against killing.
    That is true, but it is a much later development. Early in the Common Era, some Mahayana Buddhists in China (quite a few, in fact) began to practice vegetarianism very seriously as a natural outgrowth of the ahiṃsā precept. (Even today, there is a vegetarian option at many Chinese restaurants in the US called "Buddha's Delight.") The Chan tradition is from this period and reflects this movement toward vegetarianism. In the Pali Vinaya, though, the emphasis is on vairāgya: eating any food that one is given without regard for flavor, content, etc.
    "One who makes a habit of prayer and meditation will easily overcome all difficulties and remain calm and unruffled in the midst of the trials of life." (Holy Mother Sarada Devi)

  10. #40
    Join Date
    July 2009
    Location
    Dublin, Ireland
    Age
    33
    Posts
    860
    Rep Power
    1512

    Re: Why is Buddhism More Accessible in the US

    Namaste,

    If I could award you any more rep points, I would Jeffery. You were able to word my thoughts on this exactly. I wonder if much of the reason why Buddhism as the alternative non-Christian religion is so prevalent in the west is because it is driven by the media. In this modern celebrity-obsessed culture, where the slightest mental ripple can be shared worldwide via the likes of Twitter and other social networking sites, people are able to track intimately what their favourite stars are currently trending in religious practice and belief. Buddhism - amongst other New Ageist type faiths - seems to be the dominant player. I myself have known a host of people and acquaintances who have expressed their "interest" in Buddhism, having visited the likes of Thailand and Cambodia, and yet it seems less like spiritual thirst that motivates them to explore the path than it is simply the "go to" religion for people who want something other than what Christianity had to offer. Many of these people who now tentatively call themselves Buddhist are some of the biggest meat eaters I know! In fact, aside from the burden of having to claim belief in a god, all other behaviour before (drinking alcohol, smoking tobacco, etc.) seems pretty much intact. Is it safe to say it was not merely introspection on the humane treatment of living things that drove them to seek another path? Dharmically, not much is changed for them. I hope this does not sound too harsh, but it seemed almost like a change made for fashion rather than true spiritual evolution.

    A couple of years ago when I was first exploring other religious paths, I found myself drifting in and out of Buddhism and Hinduism, unsure which I felt closer to. Initially, it was Buddhism I was pulled towards. Partially it was because I had more exposure to Buddhism, but the basic premise was something I was already familiar with. Hinduism just seemed much too vast (a path with millions of gods?!) to know even where to begin, and so perhaps might seem initially intimidating to someone who has already struggled to understand just one (albeit, a very contradictory one). It also seemed so much harder to get even basic information about Sanatana Dharma as opposed to books on Buddhism which is far more prolific and accessible in libraries and bookshops.

    Om namah Shivaya
    "Watch your thoughts, they become words.
    Watch your words, they become actions.
    Watch your actions, they become habits.
    Watch your habits, they become your character.
    Watch your character, it becomes your destiny."

    ॐ गं गणपतये नमः
    Om Gam Ganapataye namah

    लोकाः समस्ताः सुखिनो भवन्तु ।
    Lokaah SamastaaH Sukhino Bhavantu

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Buddhism without Beliefs Critiqued
    By Sahasranama in forum Buddhism
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 09 January 2012, 04:28 PM
  2. God in Buddhism
    By shian in forum Buddhism
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 19 October 2011, 11:40 PM
  3. Yoga and Buddhism (differences)
    By Bob G in forum Yoga
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 04 March 2008, 03:48 AM
  4. Refutation of Dr. Naiks Exposition of Buddhism
    By Vajradhara in forum Islam
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 07 April 2006, 05:21 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •