Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 20 of 20

Thread: How can I shed my ego?

  1. #11
    Join Date
    July 2012
    Age
    46
    Posts
    1,912
    Rep Power
    2518

    Re: How can I shed my ego?

    Thank you for your brilliant replies, Yajvan ji and MD ji.

    I am eager to look up further on the topic of watching breath, as suggested by Yajvan ji. Thanks for this valuable suggestion.
    jai hanuman gyan gun sagar jai kapis tihu lok ujagar

  2. #12

    Re: How can I shed my ego?

    Namaste

    I would also be interested to hear more insights into breath meditation from Yajvan ji. I have always found Sanatana Dharma or Hindu traditions very good for Dharma Shastra, and most aspects of spirtual life, but apart from Pranayama, which is not what Yajvan here is pointing to there is very little emphasis on breathing meditation and teachings with the natural course of the breath.

    For this I have always had to go to Buddhist, the techniques and teachings of Anapanasti are abundant and Gautama Buddha gave great emphasis on just following the natural course of the breath , in very simple ways, just noticing if the breath is short, long, fast, slow without any sort of interference or trying to change the natural course of the breath, over time then one see's that the breath, weather short, long, deep, fast or slow is then related to states of mind. So if Yajvan Ji could post some of his other articles on breath meditation I would be very interested.

    As a matter of practice and one thing that I have found especially in early stages of breathing meditations or if I am rushed and have had more busy mind then chanting of some sort, recitations and so on is very beneficial before the practice of this type of mediation, its something that Buddhist do very often, this can help raise the vibration and prepare and settle the mind for concentration practices.

    I know within Hinduism, especially some tantras and Yoga's there is a strong emphasis on controlling the breath and raising the prana and having some sort of technique to alter the breath for strengthening and altering the breath for concentration and meditative states.

    So Yajvan Ji if you have written anything with your usual precious insights of natural awareness of the breath as it is in the present moment and breath alteration with technique, if you would be so kind to post any of the previous post would be much appreciated.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    September 2006
    Age
    65
    Posts
    7,705
    Rep Power
    0

    Re: How can I shed my ego?

    hariḥ oṁ
    ~~~~~~
    namasté

    I would also be interested to hear more insights into breath meditation

    Breath techniques fit into āṇavopāya class of methods¹.

    Haṃsa is 'code' for one's breath. Here is what this svacchanda tantra (7.29-30) says
    śivo dharmeṇa haṃsastu sūryo haṃsaḥ prabhānvitaḥ ||29
    ātmā vai haṃsa ityuktaḥ prāṇo haṃsasamanvitaḥ |

    Śiva is by his own nature haṃsa. The Sun filled with light is haṃsa. The soul is also called haṃsa, And breath goes along with haṃsa.

    More will be said on the matter of breath here:
    http://hindudharmaforums.com/showthr...ion-The-breath
    And here : http://hindudharmaforums.com/showthr...ghlight=breath
    And I will add other HDF Posts once found.

    Yet lets split hairs on breath observation, watching thoughts, and meditation
    If you recall from the posts above the conversation originally started with watching thoughts. This is all well-and-good for one that is just beginning and needs a discipline. We also note that I suggested watching the breath. This approach has many techniques to offer – all good vehicles. Now, the reader needs to pay a bit more attention to what I offer here as it can confuse some, and others it will clarify a few views.

    Note that when someone watches their thoughts the interference is, many-and-random thoughts. One thought can be about buying milk, the
    next one about tying your shoes, the next about an itch on your toe, another on ‘where is my keys?’ . See the point on random?
    Yet if we align one’s thoughts to just one thought again and again (in continuity) this is called dhāraṇā ‘ holding, keeping, retention’.
    The aspirant is retaining one thought and that is all – again and again. This dhāraṇā is one of the 3 items called out in patañjali’s yogadarśana and his
    aṣṭāṅga ( 8 limbs¹) of yoga .

    · dhyāna ध्यान - meditation
    · dhāraṇā धारणा - fixity, the act of holding, singleminded-ness ( as mentioned ~ fixity~ on an object in this case a thought)
    · samādhi समाधि - is one-pointed absorption; One can say the mind is absorbed or 'concentrated' - but it is not the act of concentrating
    These 3 are usually united together as one compliments the other.

    So, when one does ~observation~ with a thought-vehicle (a mantra) it is considered meditation. Yet too when one uses the gap in-between breaths ( some call the breaths soma and sūrya, others may say haṃsa) this gap, saṁdhi, in-between ,this viṣuvát¹ is the vehicle of silence. It is praised because within this silence sāmānya spanda can be found. We have not discussed this yet and will leave it for another post as it needs some depth-and-breath to explain.
    Now we have just switched from patañjali’s thinking into kaśmir śaivism and trika śāstra subject matter. That is, this silence does not mean an empty void, but it is within the realm of sāmānya spanda. This is what we wish to groom.

    So, see the slight difference in the subjects? Watching any thought vs. watching one-thought in continuity. Observing breath, but mindfully, putting one’s awareness on the gap (viṣuvát) between them. These are no doubt meditations if done in continuity (dhāraṇā).

    इतिशिवं
    iti śivaṁ

    words

    • Class of methods called upāya-s (that by which one reaches one's aim)


    • sāmbhavopāya (sāmbhava upāya)
      • This upāya The rise of Śiva consciousness by mere hints from the guru. It is via iccha śākti that the sādhu advances; the grace/will of the master. The sadhu gains entry into sāmaveśa ( posessed of the Divine), absorption of the individual consciousness in the Divine, without adapting any process. No dhyāna, mantra or any other aid is needed.
      • 1a. sāmbhavopāya is also known as anupāya or 'without means or no upāya' - the way is without a way, as one person has said it. It does not really involve any process. Due to śaktipata or descent of grace in a very intense degree, everything needed for the realization, beginning from the liquidation of individual impurity down to the recognition of the state of Parameśvara may be achieved by the sādhu immediately and without going through any sādhana or discipline.


    • śākopāya (shakti-upāya )
      • the means of approach to the Divine through śakti, the ever-recurring contemplation of the pure thought of oneself being essentially Śiva or the Supreme ahaṁ.


    • āṇavopāya
      • āṇu अणु = fine , minute , atomic is known as 'atom' - which is another name for the individual jiva. This upāya is the means whereby the āṇu or the individual jiva uses his own kāraṇa-s or instruments i.e. senses, prana and manas for self-realization. It includes disciplines concerning the regulation of prana, japa, concentration, meditation, etc.

    • madhya and viṣuvát (having or sharing both sides equally , being in the middle , middlemost , central)
    • 8 limbs are also called out in the śānḍilya upaniṣad ( named after the rsi asking the question to atharvan)

    Last edited by yajvan; 11 May 2016 at 06:34 PM.
    यतस्त्वं शिवसमोऽसि
    yatastvaṁ śivasamo'si
    because you are identical with śiva

    _

  4. #14

    Re: How can I shed my ego?

    Namaste

    Thank you Yajvan Ji, the depth as usual is mind expanding and I would certainly like to hear any more insights from you. There is so much to digest and gradually put into practice.

    I would like to offer some of the techniques that have worked for me in the past with breath meditation.


    The breath is very good for building up concentration and for heightened awareness. Very often the mind is unsteady without us even noticing it, so the breath technique can put us right in the state of heightened awareness and we may be shocked at just how unruly and untamed the untrained mind is, and many give up, without learning the power of the breath and its relation to consciousness. When meditation is given a go it can often give a direct experience of the state of mind, for some it comes as a shock.


    Lets me try and start with if the mind has to much chatter or is to busy in itself. This is the normal state of the conditioned mind and the vast majority of people, especially ones with a busy life or are new to meditation will first notice. When the mind is in this state meditation practice initially can be very difficult and one needs to have some technique to calm the mind, what needs to be considered is that many things in our development take time, so looking for instant results is not a good idea, the whole of modern way life is to expect quick results, if the Divine states are not seen straight away people give up, even before they have really started, modern society has driven deep into the modern persons subconscious to accept only quick results, hence the crazy drive for sense pleasure, having a strong resolve to stick to the practice is important it may come quick and it may take years, in terms of meditation time is not important, only the practice and gaining skill in the practice is what matters, the results will come about after a certain amount of training the mind, in its own time, as Sri Krsna says to Arjuna in Gita one needs Abhyasa and vairagya, or constant practice or the resolve to not give up and stop and detachment from that which is in opposition to meditation, The Mind itself. This is where the functions of the Mind, Buddhi, Manas, Ahamkara and Chitta are not given any direct notice to begin with, only the object of the meditation is focused upon, so there is a constant bringing ones attention back to the breath.


    In the beginning to help quiet and calm the mind, or to give the mind a more solid object to focus on it is advised to use some sort of mental object, this can be a mantra in conjunction with the breath. For this I have often used 2 syllable mantras. Buddho- or Buddha, Shiva, Krsna or what ever one feels comfortable. Breath in Bud breath out Dho, breath in Krs breath out na, breath in Shi breath out va, in Zazen they count 1 to 10, if a thought comes in then they go back to 1 and start again, for example, 1-2 ( thought comes in) 1-2-3 ( thought comes in) 1-2-3 and so on until no thought disturbs the object of counting, and a level of concentration is arrived at.


    Back to the 2 Syllable mediation Object with the Breath


    These same 2 syllable mantras can be used to for in depth concentrated in later stages when the Mind is more settle in equilibrium/Sattva and is situated in some sort of Calm abiding, then when the fruit of practice is experienced one will feel more calm, more concentrated, more centered, one should not take this as the goal, but the platform to use that energy and concentrated state to explore further, to cut into the defilement's and explore the conditions with insight and dig out the roots of obstruction. So when the technique is given the fruit of stability it is advised by some methods to directly explore the Mind and the Body with that sense of calm, body sweeping is advised and contemplation of the foul nature of the body is also advised, may sound mundane but there is an internal switch that gets triggered and one will enter a more natural and deep state and become centered more in the heart, this is where real meditation begins, where practice becomes Dhyana( real meditation) and that Dhyana will then develop into the forms of Samadhi or rich concentrated states.


    It is advised and I have some experience that just to remain in a calm state is not advised, if calm energy is attained then one needs to use that state to explore this being, either to explore subtle elements of Mind or gross elements of body to gain some insight. Why is this important, because all states of mind even Dhyana-meditation and Samatha-Calm Abiding are temporary if not looked after properly, they will in time fade, and if insight has not been practiced and when the fruit of practice has faded and one has just enjoyed the nice feeling the conditioning comes back and one is then again sent right back to where one started, no insight, no real renunciation, only by deliberation has any virtue in practice been attained, these states while giving a condition of happiness needs to be used to gain vital knowledge and deeper realizations in the temporary and causal nature of the conditions that haunt our real nature. Once these are cultured Dhyana will remain constant in all states, even when one is not in formal meditation, and that is a large part of the goal.


    This practice is known as Samatha-and Vippasana in Buddha Dharma, Samatha- deep calm of the mind is the first basis and the fertile ground of developing Samadhi, Vipassana is that which is getting direct insight into the impermanent nature of the conditioned being, leading one to freedom of naturally letting go. If these two bases are cultivated in the right way, real fruits of the practice are guaranteed and real transformation will happen. If meditation does not give some sort of transformation then more practice is needed, for without transformation of being then its not meditation and real spiritual life is not available, and one will then land back straight where they was and no real lasting change would have happened.


    When the practice becomes a little bit more advanced, one can then investigate the nature of consciousness in more refined states, one may keep the breath as the object or continue with the 2 syllable mantra , the 1-10 is certainly not needed here. One can enter into a more direct and profound relation with Krsna and Shiva and get to understand their subtle nature which is and always has been behind the conditions, the depths then is totally unlimited and the more deeper and profound levels of Samadhi will be a direct experience. Then finally we can read Yajvans posts as they are with a clearer mind and get the right context of what is being said by Shastra.

    There is more that I would like to add but will leave for another time and if its applicable to the thread.
    Last edited by markandeya 108 dasa; 12 May 2016 at 08:24 AM.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    September 2006
    Age
    65
    Posts
    7,705
    Rep Power
    0

    Re: How can I shed my ego?

    hariḥ oṁ
    ~~~~~~
    namasté


    Let’s for a moment revisit this notion of ego…this was the main subject that was brought to discussion in post 1 above.

    First what is ego? ahaṃkāra. Look at this word ahaṃ+kāra.
    · ahaṃ = aham = ‘I’ + kāra = doer, maker.
    · ahaṃ+kāra also = ahaṃkaraṇa = conception of individuality.
    So, we need to pause… the ‘I’ + ‘doer’ is the notion that via some method, process, or whatever the ‘I’ has become or thinks it is a ‘doer’ of actions, of things, etc.
    It is the notion of bringing ‘I’ into field of prakṛti. A most ~casual~ definition of this prakṛti is ‘nature’ and some would say the field of the 3 guṇa-s , said properly traiguṇya (pertaining to the 3 guṇa-s). So it is this pure ‘I’ that thinks it does things. And, this ‘I’ is associated with ego.
    Let’s address a few more questions:
    • First, where does this ~ego~ fit within the human condition? This I think will help answer the following question;
    • Why does breath upāya help the aspirant with ego abatement ?

    The ~ ego~ fit
    First note my orientation here is from a kaśmir śaivism and trika śāstra point of view. Note too that some of the same terms can be found within the saṁkhyā view, yet the final views on reality are somewhat different. I mention this as it helps clarify one’s entry point into the subject. It is the difference between diving into the ocean or diving into a shallow pond. Some will argue that the ‘diving’ part is the same ( yes no doubt), but what you are diving into makes all the difference in the world.

    Within the human condition we could outline the 36 tattva-s. Those ~elements~ for lack of a better term, that make up the person. This is one way to do it. Yet this has many moving parts , a laundry list if you will of items. Yet there is another way this can be done – by 4 conditions, some say ‘states’, avasthā ( state or condition):
    • deha
    • puryaṣṭaka
    • prāṇa
    • śūnya


    Let me define this list next but first say these conditions are not specifically calling out states of consciousness but are aligned to them.
    • deha = body and it is what exists during our wakefulness ( waking state).
    • puryaṣṭaka = pur + aṣṭaka = the stronghold ( some say the city due to the term ‘pur’) of + aṣṭaka = consisting of 8 parts. This is what exists during the dream state.
    • prāṇa – life force, that which invigorates, many call breath as it is the vehicle of this life force. This prā comes from ‘pra’ filling + ‘ana’ breath; Prāṇa is a term that also includes prāṇa , apāna , vyāna, samāna, udāna of which we will not purse, but worth noting. Prāṇa also has a hidden meaning ( as you would expect) : ‘prā’ filling + ṇa= nirvṛti = satisfaction or happiness , bliss , pleasure , delight . It also means ‘emancipation’ ; this ṇa also means attainment of rest, and that of destruction. You can see this term is quite useful and flexible. This prāṇa is aligned with the dreamless state.
    • śūnya – by definition is ‘empty, void’. It is said it contains no-thing. This śūnya is the condition of the body in the nothingness state. This causes quite the quandary for many to get their minds around this. For the moment let’s not pursue it as a main topic.


    So, where is this ego? It resides within 'the city of 8’ - puryaṣṭaka. The ‘8’ are the 5 tanmātra-s + 3 antaḥkaraṇa-s
    5 tanmātra-s
    • smell – gandha
    • rasa – taste
    • rūpa – form
    • sparśa- touch
    • śabda- sound

    3 antaḥkaraṇa-s
    • mind or manas
    • buddhiḥ or the intellect
    • ahaṃ+kāra or the ego


    We can see where this ego resides : deha---> puryaṣṭaka (ego is in this city of 8)-->prāṇa-->śūnya

    Why does a breath upāya help the aspirant with ego abatement ?
    Look at where the breath resides . It is subtler than body, and after the city of 8 within prāṇa.
    We breathe 21,600 times per day ( so say the wise, I have never counted
    ) . If we breath without awareness then nothing occurs – we are breathing like the paśvás ( cattle, the herd ). Why then does breathing with awareness assist us? Because we go ‘beyond’ the ego, simple as that.
    If you fight with the ego on its terms:
    Trying to rid one’s self of the ego is a noble cause. But, trying to do it with the ego itself is somewhat of a task. It does NOT want to go; you may convince yourself that you wish to get rid of it , but when push comes to shove this ego is a stiff competitor and will hold its ground. So, what is one to do?
    Let me switch from kaśmir śaivism back to patañjali’s thinking and offer this. Śeṣa patañjali¹ talks of ~managed~ breath in the 2nd chapter:
    वाह्याभ्यन्तरस्तम्भवृत्तिः देशकालसङ्ख्याभिः परिदृष्टो दीर्घसूक्ष्मः॥५०
    vāhyābhyantarastambhavṛttirdeśakālasaṅkhyābhiḥ paridṛṣṭo dīrghasūkṣmaḥ||50

    वाह्याभ्यन्तरविषयाक्षेपी चतुर्थः॥५१
    vāhyābhyantaraviṣayākṣepī caturthaḥ||51

    We will take a look at both of these sūtra-s and how they address managed-breath (p
    rāṇāyāma) in the next post, then (too) look at the kaśmir śaivism equivalent.

    इतिशिवं

    iti śivaṁ

    words

    1. patañjali - some say the derivation of his name comes in this manner pata + añjali
    · añjali = open hands placed side by side and slightly hollowed
    · pata – falling
    The legend says that śeṣa ( the divine serpent) incarnated and fell (pata) into open hands (añjali) of a brahmin (realized being) no less; and this incarnation was none other than patañjali. We can see why he would be called śeṣa-patañjali.
    यतस्त्वं शिवसमोऽसि
    yatastvaṁ śivasamo'si
    because you are identical with śiva

    _

  6. #16
    Join Date
    September 2006
    Age
    65
    Posts
    7,705
    Rep Power
    0

    Re: How can I shed my ego?

    hariḥ oṁ
    ~~~~~~
    namasté


    Prāṇa also has a hidden meaning ( as you would expect) : ‘prā’ filling + ṇa= nirvṛti = satisfaction or happiness , bliss , pleasure , delight . It also means ‘emancipation’ ; this ṇa also means attainment of rest, and that of destruction. You can see this term is quite useful and flexible. This prāṇa is aligned with the dreamless state.
    This somewhat hidden meaning of prāṇa helps us expose the wisdom within śeṣa-patañjali’s sūtra-s…let’s take a look.

    वाह्याभ्यन्तरस्तम्भवृत्तिः देशकालसङ्ख्याभिः परिदृष्टो दीर्घसूक्ष्मः॥५०
    vāhyābhyantarastambhavṛttirdeśakālasaṅkhyābhiḥ paridṛṣṭo dīrghasūkṣmaḥ||50

    This says that prāṇāyāma ( or in my teachers terms , the management/regulation of the breath) has the following modes or courses (vṛttiḥ):
    external (vāhya), internal (ābhyantara), and ~arrested~ (stambha); when ~observed~ (paridṛṣṭaḥ is perceived , learnt , known) according to space (deśa), time (kāla) and number (saṅkhyā) it ( the breath or the regulation/management of breath prāṇāyāma ) becomes long (dīrgha) and subtle (sūkṣmaḥ)||50

    External, internal is breath that goes out and in. Now this term stambha is defined as a column, fixedness, stoppage; it is also ‘filled’. It is that point when the lungs are filled.
    There are two types of filling. One is filled with air and the other is the lungs filled with emptiness. It is that point of the inward breath where the lungs have been filled – that stopping point just before the exhale, and ‘filled’ with emptiness . There are two sides to the filling ( full of air and full of emptiness). This is the cycle of the breath.

    When this is observed (paridṛṣṭaḥ) with awareness ( that which does the observing) this is the crux of prāṇāyāma. One is mindful of the space (deśa ) that is being filled up, the time it takes to fill (kāla) and the repetition or number (saṅkhyā). With this the breath becomes naturally long (dīrgha) and subtle (sūkṣmaḥ), another word is refined.
    We note by what is said here, this is not a deep breathing exercise. We know this because we are informed of the refinement of the breath occurs (sūkṣmaḥ).

    From a kaśmir śaivism point of view the instruction is said slightly differently ( yet not opposing):
    ऊर्ध्वे प्राणो ह्यधो जीवो विसर्गात्मा परोच्चरेत्।
    उत्पत्तिद्वितयस्थाने भरणाद् भरिता स्थितिः॥ २४
    ūrdhve prāṇo hyadho jīvo visargātmā paroccaret|
    utpattidvitayasthāne bharaṇād bharitā sthitiḥ || 24

    This we are told is bhairava (śiva) talking to none other than śrī devī so we are in good hands. In which bhairava uvāca ( says),
    The exhaling breath (here is called prāṇa in this kārikā ( a concise statement/verse) should ascend and inhaling breath ( called jīva here) should descend; both forming visarga ( : ). Their state of fullness is found by fixing them in the two places of their origin.

    In both approaches (from śeṣa-patañjali’s sūtra-s and from the vijñāna bhairava kārikā-s) we are dealing with the inward and outward breaths, and also the pause or ‘dwell point’ in the middle. The ‘fixed’ position or dwell in patañjali’s sūtra-s is called stambha; in the vijñāna bhairava kārikā just mentioned the dwell point is called visarga ( : ). It is where the breath pauses on the inward stroke of the breath and outward stoke of the breath and looks like or reminds one of a colon mark (:) of these two opposite ends of the breath. In the English language is called a colon mark : but is called visarga in saṃskṛtam’s devanāgarī script.

    What does this yield? We go back to the hidden meaning of prāṇa: ‘prā’ filling + ṇa= nirvṛti = satisfaction or happiness , bliss , pleasure , delight . It also means ‘emancipation’ ; this ṇa also means attainment of rest, and that of destruction. One gains ‘rest’, balance; But what of destruction ? We will need some additional knowledge before we can address this term.
    Where will we find it ? In the next sūtra from patañjali. It is dealing with the 4th caturthaḥ; we will address it in the next post.

    वाह्याभ्यन्तरविषयाक्षेपी चतुर्थः॥५१॥
    vāhyābhyantaraviṣayākṣepī caturthaḥ||51


    इतिशिवं
    iti śivaṁ
    Last edited by yajvan; 18 May 2016 at 04:54 PM.
    यतस्त्वं शिवसमोऽसि
    yatastvaṁ śivasamo'si
    because you are identical with śiva

    _

  7. #17
    Join Date
    September 2006
    Age
    65
    Posts
    7,705
    Rep Power
    0

    Re: How can I shed my ego?

    hariḥ oṁ
    ~~~~~~
    namasté


    continuing...

    वाह्याभ्यन्तरविषयाक्षेपी चतुर्थः॥५१॥
    vāhyābhyantaraviṣayākṣepī caturthaḥ||51

    The fourth (caturthaḥ) transports, gives up, abandons (ākṣepī) the domain/realm, field of action (viṣaya) of the external (vāhya) and internal (ābhyantara) ||51

    Note that vāhya is also written bāhya – vāhya it is a vehicle being ridden; bāhya is defined as external. So we use both writings , as the breath that is outward is bāhya बाह्य and used as a vehicle or vāhya वाह्य… a very convenient word no less.

    Now, just a bit more before we come to what this sūtra says. It is my opinion and none others’ that this 4th (caturthaḥ) used here has a double meaning:
    1. It is the 4th type of prāṇāyāma – the last post above talks of the other 3 - external, internal and the stambha ( or madhya if we use kaśmir śaivism terms) . It is another mode (vṛttiḥ) and called the 4th type, and;
    2. catur = 4, caturtha 4th ; one is the ‘cardinal’ number 4, the other is an ordinal number ‘the 4th as the 4th part of something. The 4th is also
    called turīya and is the ~jargon~ used for the 4th state or condition of consciousness which is pure consciousness, pure awareness, stainless, unbounded awareness.

    Hence we can say then in casual terms that this 4th mode (vṛttiḥ) is a vehicle (vāhya) that brings one, or deposits one in turīya – that it abandons
    (ākṣepī) the realm of the external breath and internal breath.

    Now I can answer the question from post 1, 15 & 16 :
    “What does this yield? We go back to the hidden meaning of prāṇa: ‘prā’ filling + ṇa= nirvṛti = satisfaction or happiness , bliss , pleasure , delight . It also means ‘emancipation ; this ṇa also means attainment of rest, and that of destruction.

    If one is deposited in the 4th it is beyond 'the city of 8’ - puryaṣṭaka. Where does ego reside? Within the city of 8. It has been ‘destroyed’ because
    our awareness is beyond the realm (ākṣepī) of puryaṣṭaka. See the point. In this arena it is ‘prā’ filled with undifferentiated awareness. There is no differentiated (fragmented) awareness
    here and that is where the city of 8 and the ego reside. Within the differentiated, changeable level of consciousness (wake-dream), hence it is said it is destroyed because it does not exist in the wholeness, fullness of this pure-stainless awareness.

    Now the additional question is raised. Many a s
    ādhu has been given the gift of going within, going beyond the ‘city of 8’ - puryaṣṭaka. Yet upon the
    one’s return ( outside of one’s practice) the ego and ~the city~ returns. Why so? Why is not completely destroyed?


    We will address this in the next post.


    इतिशिवं
    iti śivaṁ
    यतस्त्वं शिवसमोऽसि
    yatastvaṁ śivasamo'si
    because you are identical with śiva

    _

  8. #18
    Join Date
    September 2006
    Age
    65
    Posts
    7,705
    Rep Power
    0

    Re: How can I shed my ego?

    hariḥ oṁ
    ~~~~~~
    namasté


    Now the additional question. Many a sādhu has been given the gift of going within, going beyond the ‘city of 8’ - puryaṣṭaka. Yet upon the
    one’s return ( outside of one’s practice) the ego and ~the city~ remains. Why so? Why is not completely destroyed?

    The ego arises (again) due to the past impressions that remain. They ( these impressions vāsanā-s¹) are there and need to be removed, or mitigated, purged, etc. So a purification process (cleansing) is the order of the day. What are we purifying? All the stresses and strains, all the impressions (vāsanā-s) we have gathered over time.

    So, we return once again to kaśmir śaivism and a trika śāstra point of view for an aid on this cleasing process. I take my support from abhinavagupta-ji¹ and his work called parātriṃśikā-vivaraṇa. He says, Just as by washing the dirt or impurity lying in the inner fold of a cloth, the dirt lying on the upper portion ( the outer folds) gets automatically washed or cleansed ; even so, by the removal of the dirt (mala) lying at the subtle levels, the dirt residing at the madhyamā levels get automatically removed.

    Svāmi lakṣman-jū calls this process sūkṣma gati¹ ( the march inward), and is done with ever-refreshed awareness , accompanied and supported by anusandhāna¹ or the refinement of the breath. So we become ṣodhya¹ (the one being cleansed), the Divine is the ṣodhaka (the purifier) and the withdrawal approach is ṣodhana ( or the process). By doing this process, the aspirant is fulfilling , in part, what krsna advises, be without the 3 guna-s. When one withdraws and experiences turīya ( the 4th), the 3 guna-s are left in duality, the relative field of life, along with the ego and the city of 8.

    If impressions are one of the key ingredients to holding us back from staying within this 4th state and stabilizing it so it is there when our eyes are open and in action during the day, aren't we making these impressions all the time ? Yes we are. Now, what is one to do? The answer goes something like this ( this comes from my teacher).

    Think of making a mark on a stone say with a knife. The mark is a scrape that resembles a gash or a line in the stone. That scrape will stay there for some time.
    It will erode with time due to the weather ( rain, wind, etc). That is one's mind in the beginning. The impressions are there... over time they erode.
    Now take that same knife ( which is code for actions ) and draw a line in the sand. The line is there, yet it fills in somewhat. You can still see the impression (
    vāsanāḥ)
    but it is not as distinct - there was less of an impact. Now again take the same knife and draw a line in water... the line is there for a moment and it is gone. It
    is there long enough to know a line was the impression, but then it is gone. Last one... now take the knife and draw a line in air. Where is the impression?
    Like that , as a person purifies over time, the impressions are there to 'register' an action yet with practice one's awareness/mind is purified.
    It is the ṣodhya + ṣodhaka +
    ṣodhana¹ process.


    इतिशिवं
    iti śivaṁ

    words

    • abhinavaguta-ji is addressed as mahāmaheśvarācharya śrīmad abhinavaguptanatha by his pupil kṣemarāja .
      • abhinavaguta-ji’s master was lakṣmanagupta, and his master was utpaladeva.

    • vāsanā-s can be used two ways: vasana is clothing. It infers our coverings over the SELF; and vāsanā-s ( note the long ā’s, and this is feminine gender) are impressions. Impressions that are within in mind.
    • sūkṣma gati : sūkṣma सूक्ष्म acute , subtle , keen + gati गति manner or power of going, procession, march, passage, procedure, progress, movement


    • anu+sandha+āna : anu अनु- each by each, orderly, methodically, one after another, repeatedly; saṃdhi संधि- is the junction point, transition from one to the other; āna आन- exhaling the breath through the nose
    • ṣodhya शोध्य - to be cleansed or purified or refined or corrected or improved
    • ṣodhaka शोधक- a purifier
    • ṣodhana शोधन - the process of cleaning, purifying, correcting, improving
    Last edited by yajvan; 19 May 2016 at 01:25 PM.
    यतस्त्वं शिवसमोऽसि
    yatastvaṁ śivasamo'si
    because you are identical with śiva

    _

  9. #19
    Join Date
    September 2006
    Age
    65
    Posts
    7,705
    Rep Power
    0

    Re: How can I shed my ego?

    hariḥ oṁ
    ~~~~~~
    namasté


    It seems 3 additional things need to be offered to round out the conversation that were alluded to in several posts above but not developed.
    Due to the nature of the subject matter, it may be considered an advanced topic and will need to be offered in the 'Uttara' folder.

    Forms or expressions of spanda ; that of viśeṣa & sāmānya spanda.

    • viśeṣa - distinction , difference between; characteristic difference , peculiar mark , special property
    • sāmānya – whole, entire; equilibrium.


    And,
    śūnya that resides after (~beyond~) 'the city of 8' or puryaṣṭaka. The 4 conditions, some say ‘states’, avasthā ( state or condition) mentioned in the posts above:

    • deha
    • puryaṣṭaka
    • prāṇa
    • śūnya

    इतिशिवं
    iti śivaṁ
    यतस्त्वं शिवसमोऽसि
    yatastvaṁ śivasamo'si
    because you are identical with śiva

    _

  10. #20

    Re: How can I shed my ego?

    Namaste Viraja,

    Cultivation of Awareness or mindfulness through meditation has been stated to be one of the best means for overcoming the ego, along with unconditional love for God .

    The ego is a trait of body-consciousness . Kaam( Lust), Krodh (Anger), Lobh (Greed), Moh (Attachment), Ahankar (ego), Matsarya ( Jealously) are considered the six passions of the mind which prevent human beings from attaining enlightenment.

    Desire and ego are external creations of the inner vasanas in the unconscious mind. Awareness and total love is considered to be the best means to destroy these vasanas which create bondage, and attain enlightenment.

    Pranams.
    In every moment you only have one real choice: to be self-aware or to identify with the body and the mind. -- Annamalai Swami


    Body-consciousness is the source of all misery. -- Ramana Maharshi

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •