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Thread: Aum Sweet Om

  1. #1
    Jigar Guest

    Aum Sweet Om

    Namaste,
    Why is is Aum or Om the only hindian word that I know that is not under a line? It seems to be a free standing organization of characters that is suspended in the air. Unlike English, it not written on a line, unike Hindian, it it not written under a line. Am I understandable? WHY?

    Maste Nam,
    jigar

  2. #2
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    Re: Aum Sweet Om

    Namaste Jigar,
    Quote Originally Posted by Jigar View Post
    Am I understandable?
    Yes you are, at least to me .

    Why is is Aum or Om the only hindian word that I know that is not under a line?
    This is a good question. The AUM (OM) we use which looks like this: is actually not a spelled word, but a symbol. Actually, I believe it is derived from a very old script called Brahmi. The Brahmi script is the mother of all native South Asian scripts, and also many scripts of Southeast Asia (Thai, Balinese, Burmese, Javanese, Khmer, etc.). If we were to write the AUM phonetically in Devanagari script, for example, we could write it in one of these formats: ओम् or ओं or ओउम् and when written phonetically, it does fall under the line. Every script has its own phonetic way of writing AUM, but generally the symbol is used.

    FYI: not all "Hindian" languages are written under the line. Some (especially Southern scripts) are written on the line as with English.

    OM Shanti,
    A.
    Last edited by Agnideva; 26 May 2007 at 10:45 PM. Reason: Mistake in Devanagari script



  3. #3

    Re: Aum Sweet Om

    Quote Originally Posted by Agnideva View Post
    Namaste Jigar,

    Yes you are, at least to me .

    This is a good question. The AUM (OM) we use which looks like this: is actually not a spelled word, but a symbol. Actually, I believe it is derived from a very old script called Brahmi. The Brahmi script is the mother of all native South Asian scripts, and also many scripts of Southeast Asia (Thai, Balinese, Burmese, Javanese, Khmer, etc.). If we were to write the AUM phonetically in Devanagari script, for example, we could write it in one of these formats: ओम् or ओं or ओउम् and when written phonetically, it does fall under the line. Every script has its own phonetic way of writing AUM, but generally the symbol is used.

    FYI: not all "Hindian" languages are written under the line. Some (especially Southern scripts) are written on the line as with English.

    OM Shanti,
    A.
    Namaste Agnideva,

    You made a great answer to a great question. I have also read that the writing of Om is reflected in Brahmi script like you suggested. And in fact, the symbol for Om has a direct relationship with its spelling in Devanagari as you listed. That is, the first part of the phonetic spelling ओं is directly related to the symbol.

    What do you think of these two proposed theories about Om in Brahmi:
    Scholars have proposed that two versions of Om in Brahmi script were in use in parts of India during the 1st millennium BCE. One theory states that Indian-styled Swastika is "a monogrammatic representation of the syllable Om, wherein two Brahmi 'O's were superposed crosswise and the 'm' was represented by dot".[94] A commentary in Nature considers this theory questionable and unproven.[95]

    The second theory states that Om was represented using the Brahmi symbols for "A", "U" and "M", and that this may have influenced the unusual epigraphical features of the symbol ॐ for Om.
    http://www.wow.com/wiki/Om

    I am not particularly advocating either theory, but whichever is correct, we still can prove that Om goes back thousands of years. Considering the ancientness and importance of Om, may I please ask if it necessarily must entail any theological teachings? That is, by chanting Om, does one endorse a certain worldview or philosophy, like the Advaita or Dvaita philosophies?

    The website sindhulogy.org asks: Chapter 1 – OM OM OM! THE FIRST WORD OF GOD?
    The entire tribe was there to greet the Chief, his party, and above all, Sindhu Putra, whom they had already accepted as their own god, a sight unseen. The Ithihasa Parade song had schooled them on how they should greet their God. Respectfully, their hands were raised in Namaste and then the tribe’s silent song of welcome began.
    As I understand it, the site is presenting a fictional theory. (http://www.sindhulogy.org/projects/t...st-word-of-god)

    Subhamoy Das claims in Om or Aum: Hindu Symbol of the Absolute, beginning with his citation from the Upanishads:


    "The goal which all the Vedas declare, which all austerities aim at, and which men desire when they lead the life of continence … is Om. This syllable Om is indeed Brahman. Whosoever knows this syllable obtains all that he desires. This is the best support; this is the highest support. Whosoever knows this support is adored in the world of Brahma."
    ~ Katha Upanishad I


    ...a symbol becomes mandatory to help us realize the Unknowable. Om, therefore, represents both the unmanifest (nirguna) and manifest (saguna) aspects of God. That is why it is called pranava, to mean that it pervades life and runs through our prana or breath.
    ...
    There is harmony, peace and bliss in this simple but deeply philosophical sound. By vibrating the sacred syllable Om, the supreme combination of letters, if one thinks of the Ultimate Personality of Godhead and quits his body, he will certainly reach the highest state of "stateless" eternity, states the Bhagavad Gita.

    http://hinduism.about.com/od/omaum/a/meaningofom.htm


    However, I value your own explanations, dear forum users, which is why I wish to ask you this question!

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