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Thread: Confusion on terms and languages

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  1. #1
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    Confusion on terms and languages

    Namaste

    Since long I am confused on terms and languages - the thread of Gurmat Gurvani Veechar has now caused me to ask.

    Following are my examples

    Which language adds a ‚ru‘ at the end?
    Dasa – Sanskrit?
    Das – Hindi?
    Dasaru ???

    I learned that Hindi omits the vowel at the end.
    In a blog I read Krishn, Shiv but Buddha – why is the ‚a‘ left in Buddha.
    In the same blog I read tap instead of tapas – how many letter can be omitted?

    Which language puts a ‚m‘ at the end?
    Abhisheka – Sanskrit?
    Abhishek – Hindi?
    Abhishekam ???

    In the eastern part of India ‚v‘ and ‚b‘ seem to be exchanged.
    Kubera is Kuvera – ‚b‘ to ‚v‘
    Bhagavan is Bhagaban – ‚v‘ to ‚b‘
    Why that?

    Now in the post of Gurmat Gurvani Veechar I see the first time japo instead of japa.
    Which language exchanges ‚a‘ to ‚o‘?

    What does Gurmat Gurvani Veechar mean?

    I know Sri – which language uses Sriman and Srimad?

    Does this confuse only foreigners or Indians too?

    Thanks a lot for helping me!

    Pranam
    Dance with Shiva - live with Shiva - merge with Shiva

  2. #2
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    Re: Confusion on terms and languages

    Namaste IndiaLover,

    May I offer you a helping hand? Please read below.

    Quote Originally Posted by Indialover View Post
    Which language adds a ‚ru‘ at the end?
    Dasa – Sanskrit?
    Das – Hindi?
    Dasaru ???
    Answer: Believe it is only Telugu and Kannada.

    I learned that Hindi omits the vowel at the end.
    In a blog I read Krishn, Shiv but Buddha – why is the ‚a‘ left in Buddha.
    Answer: May be because 'Buddh' may sound ambiguous with planet 'Budha' (Mercury) or may be misunderstood to denote 'Buddhi' (intellect) and such. Never heard Buddha being shortened as 'Buddh'.

    In the same blog I read tap instead of tapas – how many letter can be omitted?
    I think 'tap' is the max.

    Which language puts a ‚m‘ at the end?
    Abhisheka – Sanskrit?
    Abhishek – Hindi?
    Abhishekam ???
    'am' is frequently appended to in Tamil language.

    In the eastern part of India ‚v‘ and ‚b‘ seem to be exchanged.
    Kubera is Kuvera – ‚b‘ to ‚v‘
    Bhagavan is Bhagaban – ‚v‘ to ‚b‘
    Why that?
    Answer: May be because their colloquial language sounds like that. They call 'Mahavir' as 'Mahabir', etc.

    Now in the post of Gurmat Gurvani Veechar I see the first time japo instead of japa.
    Which language exchanges ‚a‘ to ‚o‘?
    Answer: Believe it to be Bengali.

    What does Gurmat Gurvani Veechar mean?
    Answer: Is this something to do with Sikhism? 'Veechar' may be actually 'vichar', meaning, 'quest'.

    I know Sri – which language uses Sriman and Srimad?
    Answer: Believe those are Tamilian terms.

    No, the above terms do not confuse Indians.

    (I am yet to answer for your profound reply in the Ithihasa thread on Mahabharata, I will, shortly. Many thanks and apologies)
    jai hanuman gyan gun sagar jai kapis tihu lok ujagar

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    Re: Confusion on terms and languages

    Quote Originally Posted by Indialover View Post
    Namaste


    Which language puts a ‚m‘ at the end?
    Abhisheka – Sanskrit?
    Abhishek – Hindi?
    Abhishekam ???
    This is really the only one I can answer. Abhishekam is an inflected form in Sanskrit. Abhisheka and abhishekam are but two forms of the same word in different grammatical circumstances.

    Masculine Singular Dual Plural
    Nominative abhishekaḥ abhishekau abhishekāḥ
    Vocative abhisheka abhishekau abhishekāḥ
    Accusative abhishekam abhishekau abhishekān
    Instrumental abhishekena abhishekābhyām abhishekaiḥ
    Dative abhishekāya abhishekābhyām abhishekebhyaḥ
    Ablative abhishekāt abhishekābhyām abhishekebhyaḥ
    Genitive abhishekasya abhishekayoḥ abhishekānām
    Locative abhisheke abhishekayoḥ abhishekeṣu

    Nominative - reference to the noun itself
    Vocative - calling
    Accusative - direct object of a verb
    Instrumental - as an instrument of action (with, used by)
    Dative - to/for
    Ablative - from or away
    Genitive - possessive, belonging to
    Locative - location, place, near, on, by



    When we say om namah shivāya, shivāya is the dative case (to/for). Reverence/obeisance to Shiva.
    When we say Shivam aham bhajāmi, I worship Shiva.

    And so on for the other cases. Sanskrit is highly inflected.
    śivasya hridayam viṣṇur viṣṇoscha hridayam śivaḥ

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    Re: Confusion on terms and languages

    Thank you both!
    Dance with Shiva - live with Shiva - merge with Shiva

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