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Thread: Siva Sutras meet Mark Twain

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    Siva Sutras meet Mark Twain

    Hari Om
    ~~~~~

    Namaste,

    Mark Twain said “It's not what we don't know that hurts us, it's what we know for certain that just ain't so.”
    Those not familiar with American history may not know Mark Twain, that was his pen name or writing name. Born on the 30th of Nov 1845 as Samuel Langhorne Clemens left this earth 21st April 1910. He was a writer, satirist, lecturer, etc. Above all he had a keen eye for common sense and great viveka (discrimination).

    This statement is pregnant with wisdom and actually parallels the second sutra of the Siva Sutras. http://www.hindudharmaforums.com/showthread.php?t=2078

    How so? The 2nd sutra of the Siva Sutras says, Jnanam Bandhah

    It says, knowing is bondage. One may say how can this be? I thought knowing is a good thing?

    This is where the the masters play their role i.e. Swami Lakshman joo , Ksemaraja-ji, and Abjinavagupata muni, give us their enlightened vision.

    They say look at this sutra this way... when reading the 1st sutra if one unites it with the second sutra, this is done with the letter 'a'.
    The first sutra says Caitanyamatma.

    Combining the second we have Caitanyamatma 'a' Jnanam Bandhah
    and if we do not combine them we have Caitanyamatma Jnanam Bandhah.

    How does this help us and how does Mark Twain fit in, eh? Okay , here's the wisdom. The 2nd sutra says knowing is bondage. If we couple it with the first sutra with an 'a' it then says not knowing is bondage. As the 'a' her is then assume to = not. Just like in Vidya = knowledge and avidya is 'not' knowledge or ignornace, like that.

    We now have knowing is bondage and not knowing is bondage. Because the sutras are the least amount of words that are used to transmit the meaning, some words are implied. And the Master's bring the words.
    For this they say:
    knowing [differentiated] knowledge is bondage
    not knowing [undifferentiated] knowledge is bondage

    differentiated knowledge is that of the world we experience every day , the relative world we see of height, width, depth, speed, feelings, emotions, pressures, pains, pleasures, commitments, losses and gains. Differentiated = the variable field of life full of diversity, differences, contrasts, like that.
    undifferentiated knowledge is the knowledge (also known as direct experience) of Supreme Consciousness, of SELF.

    So , when we know the knowledge of differences, of this world it binds us more, as more diversity, more action-and-reaction come to place. Ignorance thickens.

    And, NOT knowing the undifferentiated , that Supreme level of Being, we remain in bound state, produced by the statement above.

    Enter Mark Twain-ji. He says,
    "it's what we know for certain that just ain't so " or knowing [differentiated] knowledge is bondage. We know for 'certain' this world our actions, or limitations, our list of chores, actions, projects, likes and dis-likes. We live this every day... is this the Reality we are looking for?

    "It's not what we don't know that hurts us" or not knowing [undifferentiated] knowledge. This knowledge that culminates in living in and residing in the SELF is not the cause of any grief and removes the bondage from ourselves.

    So what is this mala, this impurity we have in our eye? The impurity a.k.a. mala is not dirt, the impurity is ignorance of our undifferentiated nature of SELF. Because of this ignorance we are filled with differentiated knowledge (marketing, sales, engineering, housekeeping, medical-dental, construction, teaching, training, learning, giving, getting, possessing, etc&#179 and diversity.



    We find teachers of Truth everywhere...


    Om Namah Sivaya


    pranams,
    Last edited by yajvan; 26 October 2007 at 09:19 AM.
    यतस्त्वं शिवसमोऽसि
    yatastvaṁ śivasamo'si
    because you are identical with śiva

    _

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    Re: Siva Sutras meet Mark Twain

    Yajvan: I just browsed the site twainquotes.com . Excellent stuff. He had the knack of bringing the practical wisdom into humour, so reading his various insights are a lot easier than reading (especially for me who has no knowledge of Sanskrit) the Siva Sutras.) I'm sure there are others that jive with the Siva Sutras or other Vedas or Agamas quite nicely. Yajvan, I trust you'll find them all for the rest of us idiots. (just kidding) (Undoubtedly Twain will speak of that too - manipulating others to do the work for you (lol) as per the beginning of his classic Tom Sawyer. Then this gets to me thinking upon the other thread on mind. If Twain's essence in that quote is the same as in the Siva Sutras, then the universal mind must have a language all to its own, and when we grab it from there, we automatically translate it into our native tongue. Hmmmm.. Aum Namasivaya.
    Last edited by Eastern Mind; 21 October 2007 at 05:41 PM. Reason: clarity

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    Re: Siva Sutras meet Mark Twain

    The quote from Mark Twain and the second sutra of the Siva Sutra are similar in meaning but I think they are occurring on two vastly different levels. The differentiated knowledge mentioned in the sutra is related to mistaking oneself to be the limited individual being, not knowing the state of universal being which is undifferentiated knowledge. Mark Twain surely did not mean that!

    His quote is relevent on a lower lever - such as a man clinging to a patriotic idea and fighting against another man who clings to his own patriotic idea. That's ignorance, clinging to differentiated knowledge, and its opposite, undifferentiated knowledge, on this level, would be recognizing that since both men have these patriotic ideas, they are both acting out of their own state of attachment and identification with their own culture/country/land etc and their dispute is foolish.

    I don't think it has any other relation to the philosophy of the Siva Sutras though - perhaps a good evidence of this would be that no scholar on Mark Twain would probably make the connexion except Yajvan here.



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    Re: Siva Sutras meet Mark Twain

    hariḥ oṁ
    ~~~~~~

    Namast sunyatisunya,

    Quote Originally Posted by sunyatisunya View Post
    The differentiated knowledge mentioned in the sutra is related to mistaking oneself to be the limited individual being, not knowing the state of universal being which is undifferentiated knowledge. Mark Twain surely did not mean that!

    I don't think it has any other relation to the philosophy of the Siva Sutras though - perhaps a good evidence of this would be that no scholar on Mark Twain would probably make the connexion except Yajvan here.
    What you say is true - I am sure Mark Twain was not aiming at the same revelation we find in the Śiva sūtra-s . Yet it is there in seed form.
    The beauty is in the eye of the beholder , no? I see the possibility of a great truth ready to unfold. It seems to me, that Samuel Langhorne Clemens would make a perfect śiyaka.

    praṇām


    1. śiṣyaka शिष्यक - pupil
    यतस्त्वं शिवसमोऽसि
    yatastvaṁ śivasamo'si
    because you are identical with śiva

    _

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    Re: Siva Sutras meet Mark Twain

    Quote Originally Posted by yajvan View Post
    hariḥ oṁ
    ~~~~~~

    Namast sunyatisunya,



    What you say is true - I am sure Mark Twain was not aiming at the same revelation we find in the Śiva sūtra-s . Yet it is there in seed form.
    The beauty is in the eye of the beholder , no? I see the possibility of a great truth ready to unfold. It seems to me, that Samuel Langhorne Clemens would make a perfect śiyaka.

    praṇām


    1. śiṣyaka शिष्यक - pupil
    I can't imagine him being very interested in it, though. I think he was against religion in general.

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    Re: Siva Sutras meet Mark Twain

    hariḥ oṁ
    ~~~~~~

    Namasté sunyatisunya,
    Quote Originally Posted by sunyatisunya View Post
    I can't imagine him being very interested in it, though. I think he was against religion in general.
    The spirit of the Divine is beyond the dogma of conventional religion.

    Why then do I hold the opinion that he would? I wold talk to him on how practical it is, how common sensical it would be to be possessed of the SELF. When given the altermatives in life, and laying out why this makes sence, I see Mr. Twain as an advocate of becoming possessed of the SELF... we can talk of all the esoteric things ( this means me) , but mokṣa is for the practical person;

    When given the choice of an alternative to suffering, why would one continue to choose the path of suffering?

    praṇām
    Last edited by yajvan; 05 May 2009 at 11:37 AM.
    यतस्त्वं शिवसमोऽसि
    yatastvaṁ śivasamo'si
    because you are identical with śiva

    _

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