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Thread: Sanskrit numerology?

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    Sanskrit numerology?

    Most ancient/sacred languages like Hebrew and Greek have numerology: each letter represents or is symbolized by a number. Because of this the Bible and Greek mythology can be analyzed with 'gematria' (etc.) and 'isopsephy,' which there must be a similar science of for Sanskrit. Is this true and have there been any numerological studies of the Vedas or other texts? Where could one read a list of Sanskrit numerology or find a classic book on its symbolism?

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    Re: Sanskrit numerology?

    I have some idea about the value of numbers in Hindu music and Hindu worship, specially the sacred geometry of yantras; it seems that there is a Sanskrit numerology, as this cursory search using google provides. I haven't gone through the links though:

    KATAPAYADI NOTATION ON A SANSKRIT ASTROLABE
    http://www.new.dli.ernet.in/rawdatau...005b66_273.pdf

    http://www.google.com/search?client=...utf-8&oe=utf-8
    रत्नाकरधौतपदां हिमालयकिरीटिनीम् ।
    ब्रह्मराजर्षिररत्नाढ्यां वन्दे भारतमातरम् ॥

    To her whose feet are washed by the ocean, who wears the Himalayas as her crown, and is adorned with the gems of rishis and kings, to Mother India, do I bow down in respect.

    --viShNu purANam

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    Re: Sanskrit numerology?

    read vedic maths by shankracharya bharati krishna tirth
    Secular and spiritual life were so intertwined in Vedic India that mathematical formulas and laws were often taught within the context of spiritual statements (mantras). Thus while learning spiritual lessons, one could also learn mathematical rules. The Vedic mathematicians prefer to use the devanagari letters of Sanskrit to represent the various numbers in their numerical notations rather than the numbers themselves, especially where large numbers are concerned. This made it much easier for the students of this mathematics to record the arguments and the appropriate conclusions. In order to help the pupil to memorise the material studied and assimilated, they made it a general rule of practice to write even the most technical and abstruse textbooks in sutras or in verse (which is so much easier - even for children - to memorise). And this is why we find not only theological, philosophical, medical, astronomical and other such treatises but even huge dictionaries, in Sanskrit verse! So from this standpoint, they used verse, sutras and codes for lightening the burden and facilitating the work (by versifying scientific and even mathematical material in a readily assimilable form)!

    The code used is as follows:
    The Sanskrit consonants
    ka, ta, pa, and ya all denote 1;
    kha, tha, pha, and ra all represent 2;
    ga, da, ba, and la all stand for 3;
    Gha, dha, bha, and va all represent 4;
    gna, na, ma, and sa all represent 5;
    ca, ta, and sa all stand for 6;
    cha, tha, and sa all denote 7;
    ja, da, and ha all represent 8;
    jha and dha stand for 9; and
    ka means zero.

    Vowels make no difference and it is left to the author to select a particular consonant or vowel at each step. This great latitude allows one to bring about additional meanings of his own choice. For example kapa, tapa, papa, and yapa all mean 11. By a particular choice of consonants and vowels one can compose a poetic hymn with double or triple meanings. Here is an actual sutra of spiritual content, as well as secular mathematical significance:
    gopi bhagya madhuvrata
    srngiso dadhi sandhiga
    khala jivita khatava
    gala hala rasandara

    While this verse is a petition to Lord Krishna, when learning it one can also learn the value of pi/10 (i.e. the ratio of the circumference of a circle to its diameter divided by 10) to 32 decimal places. It has a self-contained master-key for extending the review to any number of decimal places. The translation is as follows: "O Lord anointed with the yoghurt of the milkmaids' worship (Krishna), O saviour of the fallen, O master of Shiva, please protect me."

    At the same time, by application of the consonant code given above, this verse directly yields the decimal equivalent of pi divided by 10: pi/10 = 0.31415926535897932384626433832792. Thus, while offering mantric praise to Godhead in devotion, by this method one can also add to memory significant secular truths.
    तद्विद्धि प्रणिपातेन परिप्रश्नेन सेवया ।
    उपदेक्ष्यन्ति ते ज्ञानं ज्ञानिनस्तत्वदर्शिनः ॥

    उस ज्ञान को तू तत्वदर्शी ज्ञानियों के पास जाकर समझ, उनको भलीभाँति दण्डवत्* प्रणाम करने से, उनकी सेवा करने से और कपट छोड़कर सरलतापूर्वक प्रश्न करने से वे परमात्म तत्व को भलीभाँति जानने वाले ज्ञानी महात्मा तुझे उस तत्वज्ञान का उपदेश करेंगे. श्रीमद्*भगवद्*गीता-4.34

  4. #4

    Re: Sanskrit numerology?

    Quote Originally Posted by DavidC View Post
    Most ancient/sacred languages like Hebrew and Greek have numerology: each letter represents or is symbolized by a number. Because of this the Bible and Greek mythology can be analyzed with 'gematria' (etc.) and 'isopsephy,' which there must be a similar science of for Sanskrit. Is this true and have there been any numerological studies of the Vedas or other texts? Where could one read a list of Sanskrit numerology or find a classic book on its symbolism?
    Sanskrit numerology can be found in the book The Eastern mysteries: An Encyclopaedic guide to sacred languages Book by David Allen Halsey

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