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Thread: whoah Shiva in Judaism

  1. #1

    whoah Shiva in Judaism

    just when I thought that semitic religions dont have any further ties with Hinduism.

    Shiva smears his body with ashes (bhasma).[75] Some forms of Shiva, such as Bhairava, are associated with a very old Indian tradition of cremation-ground asceticism that was practiced by some groups who were outside the fold of brahmanic orthodoxy.[76] These practices associated with cremation grounds are also mentioned in the Pali canon of Theravada Buddhism.[77] One epithet for Shiva is "inhabitant of the cremation ground" (Sanskrit: śmaśānavāsin, also spelled Shmashanavasin), referring to this connection.


    Dear Name@Withheld,
    I suggest "The Bridge of Life" by Rabbi Y. M. Tuchichinsky.
    In the right time and place, you might respectfully point out to your parents that according to Jewish law, one should not "sit shiva" (observe Jewish mourning rites) for someone who was cremated voluntarily, nor is one obliged to bury their ashes. You will not be able to properly mourn for her, and no kaddish will be said for her. This may have an impact. In addition, the body of a voluntarily cremated person is not liable for resurrection; this is not so much because of the physical impediment, but rather in line with the concept that one who doesn't believe in resurrection will not experience it. Cremation declares that this world is the beginning and end of Man. A basis of Jewish faith is that this is not true. The body is held on deposit, and together with the soul, it really belongs to G-d. G-d decides when and where a person should die, and what should be done with the body once it has fulfilled its "this-worldly" purpose.
    http://webcache.googleusercontent.co...&hl=en&ct=clnk

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shiva_(Judaism)
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bereave...riah_and_shiva

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    Re: whoah Shiva in Judaism

    Interesting. While I've always respected Judaism, I've got to disagree with the rabbi here. Cremation does not imply that this world is the beginning and end of man. In fact, that seems like more of a Reform Jewish view than a Hindu one. We have always done cremation, and we certainly believe in life after death!

  3. #3

    Re: whoah Shiva in Judaism

    Quote Originally Posted by sanjaya View Post
    Interesting. While I've always respected Judaism, I've got to disagree with the rabbi here. Cremation does not imply that this world is the beginning and end of man. In fact, that seems like more of a Reform Jewish view than a Hindu one. We have always done cremation, and we certainly believe in life after death!
    There is no scientific evidence for the hereafter. Even if there is a possibility that life goes on after death on another plane of existence. Still one should not base this lifetime, in this universe, upon that - unprovable hopeful faith. One has to fulfill his existence on the here and now. Not upon the what ifs.

    Religion whose ultimate goal is to bring you to somewhere else, and makes you strive your life for the promise of that somewhere else, is a baseless one.

    You are what you are. That Self based upon the nowness. Wouldnt matter where you end up.

    The worth of this life will be devalued if you were to operate based upon the idea that there is more than this one.

    For the enlightened beings who seek none but the Supreme Lord and offer whole-hearted obeisance to Him. Material causes are of irrelevance to them. Whether they are on earth or in heaven, wherever they may be, they will be absorbed in devotion to the Lord no less.

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    Re: whoah Shiva in Judaism

    Vannakam Kumar Das:

    It was my impression that reincarnation was a fundamental tenet, and a given in Hinduism. Of course there is always that lingering bit of agnosticism, I suppose. Is that what you are referring to?

    Aum namasivaya

  5. #5

    Re: whoah Shiva in Judaism

    Quote Originally Posted by Eastern Mind View Post
    Vannakam Kumar Das:

    It was my impression that reincarnation was a fundamental tenet, and a given in Hinduism. Of course there is always that lingering bit of agnosticism, I suppose. Is that what you are referring to?

    Aum namasivaya
    Vannakkam Eastern Mind,

    I would'nt consider myself to be an agnostic because I have my basic fold within Hinduism.

    We Hindus believe foremost purpose of one's life is to fulfill spiritual enlightenment.

    I try not to think about whatever is to happen. I try my best with what I have now. If I make it, I make it, and I should do whatever it takes to make it.

    Yes, I'm skeptical of heaven, hell and, reincarnation-from a mortal perspective. Even if samsara is real, we have got this one shot, so its best to make use of it. So it would'nt matter, as long as we dedicated on the path of liberation.

    Aum Nama Shivaya

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    Re: whoah Shiva in Judaism

    Shivah (שבעה) in Hebrew means 'seven'. It refers to the week-long mourning period for relatives. I see no connection between the Hebrew word and Lord Shiva in Hinduism.

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    Re: whoah Shiva in Judaism

    Exodus 13:21-22. By day the Lord went ahead of them in a pillar of cloud to guide them on their way and by night in a pillar of fire to give them light, so that they could travel by day or night. Neither the pillar of cloud by day nor the pillar of fire by night left its place in front of the people.

    When Brahma and Vishnu fought between themselves as "who is the greatest", Lord Shiva appeared before them as a pillar of fire. They were not able to find the starting and end of that pillar.

  8. #8

    Re: whoah Shiva in Judaism

    The new religions are heavily influenced by the truths of hinduism. They inspire us now to think further than orthodoxy.
    there is the book of confusion and the book of enlightenment, where the last one is, I have no idea.

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