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Thread: T-Shirts

  1. #1

    T-Shirts

    I'm getting ready to draw up some T-Shirts to sell for Charity. I've already finished one of Krishna.. I'm gonna start doing Ganesh and then Saraswati or maybe vice versa since she is the Goddess of the Arts.

    I just have one question.. Does Ganesh always have a Pot belly? Because I'm thinking of giving him Muscular Abs.. So Pot Belly or Nice Abs??

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    Re: T-Shirts



    Where's Rajan Zed when you need him???

    Firstly, there's a reason Ganesh has a pot belly, he likes his sweets :P
    Secondly.... well I'm not sure I'm too keen on wearing images of the deities so casually. I am sure a good many will agree. Sorry


  3. #3

    Re: T-Shirts

    Namaste Tirisilex,

    From what I've seen, Lord Ganesh is always portrayed with a pot belly. In the scriptures He is portrayed as having a sweet tooth, but there is also symbolism behind it. Lord Ganesh is arguably the deity with the most symbols, as He has so many wonderful attributes. Generally from what I've seen, the pot belly symbolizes the digestion of all that life has to offer, both good and bad. But of course there are different takes on it.

    Here are a few websites about the symbolism of Lord Ganesh:

    http://www.indiaparenting.com/indian.../fest061.shtml

    http://www.angelfire.com/id/croon/in...neshabody.html

    http://www.religionfacts.com/hinduis...es/ganesha.htm

    As for images of deities being of t-shirts, it's definitely a touchy subject. I myself was originally against it, then I supported it, and now I'm generally against it. Images of deities are just too important and honorable to be placed on clothing and worn on the body. But that's just my opinion.

    Jai Sri Krishna

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    Re: T-Shirts

    Vannakkam Tirisilex:

    Ganesha always has a pot-belly. Abs would be in for criticism, for distorting tradition. Warriors like Murugan or Rama might be more appropriate with abs. Temple guardian statues are always well build tough looking guys.

    I was given or bought a Murugan t-shirt in Mauritius. Amazingly, when I got back home, it was one of those items of clothing that 'disappeared'. I have no idea where it went. I took that as a bit of a sign.

    So although personally, I wouldn't wear a t-shirt, I have no problem if others do. We have no right to dictate these relatively minor (compared to crimes like adultery or vandalism to our temples) things to anyone, as it is a personal choice.

    I believe you are doing drawings on your own. I 'd like to see them, so why not post them on here?

    Aum Namasivaya

  5. #5

    Re: T-Shirts

    So Pot belly it is.. I'll post the pics up once they are finished.

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    Re: T-Shirts

    namaste Tirisilex.

    I think this matter was discussed earlier in HDF. Many people might favour T-shirts with Hindu God images, but if one looks at it, I think it would be mostly Hindu converts who like such ideas perhaps because of notions of personal assertion to their favoured deity: 'Hey, look, I wear you even on my chest, not just keep you in the shirne room.'

    IMHO, since the Hindu tradition has not done it, it is better to refrain from such ideas. For one reason, personal clothes get soiled and dirty, and no one would want their Gods to come to such state. Most traditional Hindus do not keep God images in the form of metal or stone in their pUjA rooms and do abhiSheka, since such rituals require strict rigours.

    I have no reservations, however, about Hindu symbols such as AUM, jyoti, svastikA, etc. being used in personal clothing, but these should not be used in sandals, shoes or in the restroom.

    Although Hindu Dharma is most liberal in the path of jnAna yoga, when it comes to karma and bhakti, dos and don'ts are alwyas there, decided by scriptures, sages and traditions.
    रत्नाकरधौतपदां हिमालयकिरीटिनीम् ।
    ब्रह्मराजर्षिररत्नाढ्यां वन्दे भारतमातरम् ॥

    To her whose feet are washed by the ocean, who wears the Himalayas as her crown, and is adorned with the gems of rishis and kings, to Mother India, do I bow down in respect.

    --viShNu purANam

  7. #7

    Re: T-Shirts

    I don't see it as "Hey! Look at what I'm into." It's like "Hey, I think this is Cool." Where one is trying to portray something and the other isn't a statement but an interest.

    I've seen shirts online

    http://www.hinduartyogaclothing.com/...a-T-shirts.htm

    There are more out there..
    I don't see the problem wearing a shirt.. What If I wanted to put a Mandala on a T-Shirt??

  8. #8

    Re: T-Shirts

    Also I kind of see wearing a Shirt with Divinities as a practice of Bhakti

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    Re: T-Shirts

    Vannakkam Tirisilex:

    I am really torn on this one. On pilgrimage in India, the prime land of the Hindus, I cannot actually once remember seeing any t-shirts with Gods on them. Admittedly, I was too focused on God to notice. This next time when I go, I'll take a good look at the temple bazaars in Madurai, Palani, Tiruchendur, Haridwar, etc. ... I'm not too blissed out to remember. It seems like its the American .. it's cool, but I don't really understand syndrome.

    On the other hand, the spread of Hinduism in whatever way it happens is a good thing. All life is sacred. Gandhi cleaned toilets. There is actually no harm in anything. God is all and in all. Free speech and free expression is part of American society I so admire that. But then there are the raves where ecstacy, marijuana, and Hindu imagery go hand in hand. There is something wrong with that association of lose morality to Hionduism that does happen in the American subculture.

    So, I am torn. In the end it is up to you, and you alone, as always. I believe if you are in tune with lord Ganesha`s darshan, you will be given a sign in one way or another so that it is more clear.

    BTW, who is the fundraiser benefitting.

    Aum Namasivaya

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    Re: T-Shirts

    The thing is...IMO anyways...many people in the West wear t-shirts or have tattoos of Hindu deities, while not having any adherence of, or even knowledge about, the actual religion. I mean, I've seen many tattoos...especially of Ganesha...on just hear that he's the "remover of obstacles" and think of him as nothing more than a symbol of such a thing.

    It reminds me of the people who get tattoos of Chinese calligraphy characters on them, often taking the tattoo artists' word for what it means, when often neither of them have a clue. For example, this website is devoted to helping misguided Westerners find out what their tattoos REALLY mean: http://hanzismatter.blogspot.com/ It's good for a laugh.

    Don't get me wrong though. I love well-executed tattoos, and have quite a few myself. I even have one tattoo that is in Ancient Greek. (*) But see, I can actually READ Ancient Greek, and made sure that the tattoo artist copied my notes exactly...


    ____________________________________________________________

    (*) It says, Μολὼν λαβέ, which means, "Come and take them!" It was King Leonidas's response to the Persian Emperor Xerxes at the Battle of Thermopylae, when 300 Spartans held off the Persian army of hundreds of thousands. Xerxes said that the Spartans would be free to leave with their lives if they just handed over their weapons. Of course, this response "Come and take them!" meant that Leonidas was prepared to fight to the death. (This was depicted in the very "over the top" movie 300...) I was in the Army, and have a bit of a क्षत्रिय spirit, I guess you might say. I'm also considering getting the verse from the Bhagavad Gita that starts with: "Die, and you win heaven. Conquer, and you enjoy the earth." Exhortations to fight always inspire me, regardless of whether that fight is internal or external.

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