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Thread: Daoism & Dharma

  1. #1
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    Daoism & Dharma

    I believe simplicity is the best, so I will keep this post short.


    What are the differences between Dharma and Daoism?

    While we in Dharma seek to strive with the ultimate reality. Daoists seek merely to live in harmony with it.

    While we in Dharma see Gods as an important and inherent aspect to Dharma. "Religious" Daoists see them as a byproduct of the Dao. "Philosophical" Daoists puts Gods to the side.

    We in Dharma see the importance of living a "self controlled" life. Daoists see trying to control the self as an interference with the natural order of things.

    We in Dharma use the scriptures and our meditation to guide us. Daoists use nature, and their own interpretation of it to guide them.


    Now comes the "hard part". What is "better"(subjectively of course) to live in accord with the ultimate reality(Dao) or to strive to be united with it? Are they the same? Are they different? Why does it matter?


    Namaste

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    Re: Daoism & Dharma

    hari o
    ~~~~~~

    namasté

    I see it slightly differently - which then influences the kind of answer or discussion that may unfold.

    Dao ( some prefer the spelling Tao) is a philosophy. The word itself as I comprehend it means 'path'. Hence the philosophy of a path or way that is engaged by their three jewels - humility, compassion and moderation which I see as self-control. These values are noble, excellent and something one should aspire to bring to full bloom in this life.
    Now consider dharma धर्म - this word is rooted dhṛ meaning that which upholds, supports, preserves. It is a basic functional quality of this universe and many times see it as the quality of viṣṇu, He that uplifts, preserves and supports.
    It is almost talking the basic physical laws of nature that allows this full functioning universe to exist. At this level it is beyond philosophy.

    Now let's add in the notion of sanātana dharma. This sanātana means eternal , perpetual , permanent , everlasting. So sanātana dharma is that which uplifts and supports eternally. This sanātana dharma is also called ārṣa dharma.

    This ārṣa means 'derived from ṛṣi-s' - the great seers, who have viewed and experienced the essence of creation (sattā). From here our values arise - from here different schools of thought manifest.

    So as I see it it is very difficult to try and equate Dao with dharma, because without dharma¹, this Dao could not come into being.

    Others may differ...

    praṇām


    words
    1. we find dharma in the ṛg (rig) ved as dhárman
    Last edited by yajvan; 10 April 2011 at 08:08 PM.
    यतस्त्वं शिवसमोऽसि
    yatastvaṁ śivasamo'si
    because you are identical with śiva

    _

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    Re: Daoism & Dharma

    I agree with most of this except with "Without Dharma Dao could not come into being". I believe that this is a rather strange way at looking at it. The Dao is the infinite potential, the base 0, the all pervading Brahman but not merely these.
    How is not Sanatana Dharma the way of Dao. Dao is the underlying infinite principle nature of the Universe. As for my views on Moksha, I think this video clears my view up a bit

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7blUY...eature=related

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    Re: Daoism & Dharma

    hari o
    ~~~~~~

    namast

    Quote Originally Posted by yajvan View Post
    I see it slightly differently - Others may differ...
    praṇām
    यतस्त्वं शिवसमोऽसि
    yatastvaṁ śivasamo'si
    because you are identical with śiva

    _

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    Re: Daoism & Dharma

    Quote Originally Posted by TheOne View Post
    As for my views on Moksha, I think this video clears my view up a bit

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7blUY...eature=related
    When Alan Watts talks he sounds great, like a flowerly tree that doesn't bear any fruits. No Hindu sage would make someone feel guilty for simply existing or hit a student with a stick just for showing up. These practices are based in the concepts of original sin of Christianity and the idea that there does not exist anything to be grasped of Buddhism.

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    Re: Daoism & Dharma

    Quote Originally Posted by Sahasranama View Post
    When Alan Watts talks he sounds great, like a flowerly tree that doesn't bear any fruits. No Hindu sage would make someone feel guilty for simply existing or hit a student with a stick just for showing up. These practices are based in the concepts of original sin of Christianity and the idea that there does not exist anything to be grasped of Buddhism.
    Sahasranama, for me it seemed like he didn't agree with the concept of original sin, did you misunderstood him or did I misunderstood you?

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    Re: Daoism & Dharma

    Yes, he also said he believes in a self, but then he brings an example from Buddhism that is based on the Buddhist idea that there does not exist anything to be grasped. Then he starts talking how we need to feel guilty before we can begin our journey. Just some inconsistencies in his thought.

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    Re: Daoism & Dharma

    Quote Originally Posted by Sahasranama View Post
    Yes, he also said he believes in a self, but then he brings an example from Buddhism that is based on the Buddhist idea that there does not exist anything to be grasped. Then he starts talking how we need to feel guilty before we can begin our journey. Just some inconsistencies in his thought.
    He never said we *had* to feel guilty, he said its a byproduct of our cultural conditioning. We feel that we have to go through a "long and arduous journey" before we become awake that we have to somehow "deserve" enlightenment.

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    Re: Daoism & Dharma

    I expect him to be a little fuzzy headed since he is trying to combine all asian spirituality under one denominator. Maybe not something bad for someone who wants to avoid the label "religious." He sounds a bit like a Hindu, but officially he is a Zen Buddhist. But maybe I didn't understand what he was trying to say.

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    Re: Daoism & Dharma

    Sahasranama, for me it felt more like an example than combining per se.

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