Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Hindu Temple Token Coins

  1. #1
    Join Date
    February 2012
    Posts
    1,522
    Rep Power
    2729

    Hindu Temple Token Coins

    Hindu Temple Coins

    Sometimes these were call Ramatankas. Temple coins or tokens which pictured the Devas on the coins and often included native script including date, name of a local saint or the name of the temple and location, goes back centuries. Early on they were stamped and used as holy offerings, but by the 1800’s they are produced for sale at holy sites and temples as a source of income for the temple and kept by devotees as holy tokens or even murthis. Some were made by fine jewelers and many in metal from Calcutta based metal shops. Some of the stamps were used through the 19th Century into modern era.

    In the 12th Century they were often minted in gold, mostly these were found in South India. This is because Muslim rulers who controlled areas of Nothern India forbade any such holy tokens which depicted a figure or Deva, or any human-like stamps such as depictions of saints and mystics.

    After World War II, Diwali tokens became popular, often in silver. These would depict Ganesha and Lakshmi. However, in the olden days, most of the temple coins depicted the great epics, especially from the Ramayana. Thus the term “Ramatankas”, they would be stamped with Sita-Ram and of course the beloved Hanuman. Coins of Lakshman, Bharata and Shatrughnawere also made.

    In July of 2011, a treasure worth over 10 billion dollars (500 billion rupees) including such coins were found in vaultsunder the Sri Padmanabhaswamy Temple in Thiruvananthapuram India, and there are more secret chambers which have been closed for over 150 years. This is a temple dedicated to Lord Vishnu and built hundreds of years ago by the King of Travancore, but has origins back to the 6th Century, and has many treasures which are donations by devotees. It is considered one of the108 Divya Desams or Holy Abodes of Maha Vishnu. Thousands of gold coins and tokens were found. Since Independence, a trust managed by descendants of the Travancore Royal Family have managed the temple. However, India’s Supreme Court ordered that the temple valuables will be managed by the State. The actual value in materialistic terms o fthis temple exceed that of Tirupathi Temple in Andhra Pradesh which was thought to be the richest temple. This value of the treasures at the Vishnu temple is believed to actually exceed that of Tirupathi, and it is believed that in fact there are many other temples which have coins, jewelry and wealth of equal value that may tempt plunder by materialists and government both domestic and international - for example the 108 Vishnu Temples so noted. Islamic invaders have sent various documentsand “espionage” information to faraway Islamic states regarding specific, likely locations, and there is without question an interest in plundering such treasures to this very day by such foreign entities which would be justified under the pretext of Islamic law.

    Temple coins can bring great benefit to the holder. They can bring blessings, definitely good luck, even communion with the Deva. Such a coin can be used if needed, such as if you become holy and a demon puts you into a “Ravana maze” (such as a Labyrinth which Ravan had built before the Palace and Garden) to pay an exit toll from a guardian gate. You should carry a temple token!

    Here is a scan of one of my temple coins, of Hanuman from 1839 – it is an old stamp every 100 years, e.g. there was an 1939 version for example 100 years later. On one side is the famous “Sach Bola, Sach Tola” (Speak the Truth, Scales of Truth) with an early stamp of Hanuman and two cats holding the scale, and on the other side Hanuman standing. It is said if you obtain 3 of this same coin you will obtain Siddha. I also have Shiva-Parvati old temple coin from East India Company (the Company sponsoredsome coins for some temples) from 1816.

    AUM NAMAH SIVAYA
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
    Join Date
    July 2010
    Location
    The Holy Land - India
    Posts
    2,824
    Rep Power
    5429

    Re: Hindu Temple Token Coins

    Namaste,

    Interesting information, thanks for sharing. How does one go about acquiring such coins?

    Pranam

  3. #3
    Join Date
    February 2012
    Posts
    1,522
    Rep Power
    2729

    Arrow Re: Hindu Temple Token Coins

    Namaste Believer, you live in Mother India? Oh you should have no problem finding these temple token coins, at temple sites and where they sell God posters nearby.

    Now Diwali silver tokens with Ganesh and Laxsmi are VERY easy to find in jewelry shops, but these are not on the same standard of - what is the word I am looking for? - "mystic" or "shakti" or bhakti as the true temple coins.

    Now if this is not possible, you could consider the internet stores such as eBay for example... if you want some of the truly famous ones however, they may be costly.

    For example the one I show is 1839. I saw a 1939 stamp of the same famous which is 100 years later and using a more modern stamp of Sach Bola Hanuman which currently is on sale for 1,000 US dollars. Others can be only a few dollars. But it is not the dollar value - it is the not so secret secret behind the coin.

    There are also recent "reprints" taken using wax to copy the originals then cast. There is nothing wrong in this, unless they are trying to sell the coin as original date to a collection who is a coin collector as original date. That is wrong.

    However using authentic and old, traditional stamps for temple token coins is a long standing tradition and for the purpose of a coin that will give the holder blessings should be expected - there is nothing wrong in this since certan stamps have a proven track record in power and blessing. Recent dating however should be used if dating the coin but not so in all cases since the idea is the blessing of the coin and the collectible value of this coin token in terms of power, bhakti and blessing and not just a coin in some coin collectors portfolio who does not care for Hinduism or the Temple.

    If you wish for the coin, you surely will find it.

    Jai Shri Hanumana ki Jai, Jaya Jaya Om!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    August 2012
    Location
    Indiana, USA
    Age
    35
    Posts
    419
    Rep Power
    690

    Re: Hindu Temple Token Coins

    Thank you for the interesting post, Shivafan!

    I have what I believe to be a temple coin, although I know next to nothing of its origins or background. (Picture below) It is most certainly a reproduction and while I don't know the metal, my best guess would be something like nickel or pewter.

    It's quite lovely on both sides. I keep it with me wherever I go. I acquired it from the local Temple after making a donation. There is an area where people can leave devotional items such as devotional books, murti, pictures, japa mala, and small trinkets. Those who wish to take something are welcome to, but are encouraged to give a donation. So I found this at the bottom of the box. I know it is Radha-Krishna on one side.

    The opposite side is has many symbols - most of which I don't recognize. Would anyone be kind enough to tell me what they all mean? I would be grateful!

    Thankyou!

    Peace.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  5. #5
    Join Date
    February 2012
    Posts
    1,522
    Rep Power
    2729

    Re: Hindu Temple Token Coins

    Namaste Jodhaa

    I did try my very, very best, but I am not sure if I came up with totally the correct answer to your question ... But MOST of it, I did get correct!

    First off, you have a very nice token! This is to bring you all Good Luck and opulences. It is not specific to a particular Temple, but it is sort of "general purpose" and is Vaishnav in nature and will bring you benefit and it is good to have ready.

    The token is based on an 1818 AD East India Company ½ Anna. Probably the lost wax method was used on the Anna coin to make a mold which was then edited to include cows, some items from the original coin were modified or simplified for the purpose of reproduction. I do not know the date of this stamp, but this token is Vaishnav and might be from Bengal of Mathura area and feels like itis probably in the 1800’s but I am not sure.

    On the backside of the token, in the center – is the Kalash pot with coconut and banana or mango leaves. A brass, mud or copper pot is filled with water. Mango leaves are placed in the mouth of the pot and a coconut is placed over it. A red or white thread is tied around its neck. This gives you Prosperity. It says “Welcome” (to guests, to rishis,yogis, and such who come to your home).

    I believe in addition to GOOD LUCK in the symbols on the back side, I see the SIX OPULENCES OF VISHNU OR KRISHNA.

    Around the Kalash is the two words “Good” and “Luck” (e.g. Shuv and Lav) and then a set of symbols. We will startfrom the Top (V) symbol and move clock-wise:

    1 – This is the Tilak (forehead marking using white clay V and typically red clay Strike) indicating Vaishnava.

    2 – This is what I believe is an Elephant. The Elephant represents one of the Six Opulences of Krishna or Vishnu –the Opulence of Wealth (AISVARYA).

    3 – The word “Lav” or LUCK (“Good” is on the other left side…)

    4 – The word “Shri”. Sri in this case does not represent Lakshmi or Wealth if speaking of the Six Opulences, but represents one of the Six Opulences of Krishna or Vishnu – the Opulence of Beauty (SREE).

    5 – I THINK this looks like a Hindu version of the Jain symbol , representing the 3 LOKS (worlds), you also see the HAND (below) of which within is found Wheel (or in some cases Chakra, or even the Sun and the Moon). However, we do not see the Swastika here which typically would be in the upper section. Note, this symbol or shape (the outter shape that outlines the inner objects) is also ancient form of an abstract Jain Saint or Hindu Yogi sitting in meditation. (By the way, a strict authorized Hindu Temple also represents a Human male laying on his back - I will discuss this some other time) ... I admit I could be totally wrong that this is the same symbol of the 3 Worlds-Loks, but … If this is what I think it is, then thisrepresents one of the Six Opulences of Krishna or Vishnu – the Opulence of Renunciation or Detachment(VAIRAGYA). However, there are obviously some feature that do not represent the Jain symbol (shown below) but the Hindu version would be different. But of the Six Opulences, "detachment" is missing unless this is the symbol ...



    6 – Vishnu Pad, the footprints of Vishnu. The Vishnu Pad represents one of the Six Opulences of Krishna or Vishnu – the Opulence of Fame (YASA).

    7 – This is the Hand holding the Chakra (e.g. Vishnu holds the chakra weapon, wheel, or galaxy). The Chakra represents one of the Six Opulences of Krishna orVishnu – the Opulence of Strength or Dharma (VIRYA).

    8 – This is the OM (AUM) symbol. This represents one of the Six Opulences of Krishna or Vishnu – the Opulence of Knowledge (JNANA).

    9 – The word “Shuv” or GOOD (“Luck” is on the other right side…)

    10 – I THINK this is a Shenai, Mridanga and Drum representing Kirtana (singing the praises of Deva or Devi), but I could be wrong since this one has me confused and guessing!

    “God is He who possesses the six opulences, dharm, gyan,vairagya, shree, yash, and aishvarya to an unlimited degree.”

    I am sorry that I could not get all the symbols and so I admit in part this is inference. But I believe I got most of it right (e.g. Kalash no question about it, "Good Luck" no question about it). I hope if any other Members see this posting and know the absolute answer, thank you ahead of time!


    May Krishna bless the Vaishnavas!
    Om Namah Sivaya

  6. #6
    Join Date
    August 2012
    Location
    Indiana, USA
    Age
    35
    Posts
    419
    Rep Power
    690

    Re: Hindu Temple Token Coins

    Quote Originally Posted by ShivaFan View Post


    I am sorry that I could not get all the symbols and so I admit in part this is inference. But I believe I got most of it right (e.g. Kalash no question about it, "Good Luck" no question about it). I hope if any other Members see this posting and know the absolute answer, thank you ahead of time!


    Namaste, Shivafan!

    You have done more then I could have hoped for! Thank you for that amazing input. Even knowing what one of the mystery symbols means expands my understanding of the coin, so thank you. I also appreciate the background you gave on it. I love history.

    Peace!

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 44
    Last Post: 06 April 2014, 06:07 AM
  2. khalsa rejects
    By GURSIKH in forum Sikhism
    Replies: 44
    Last Post: 26 March 2012, 02:28 PM
  3. Replies: 17
    Last Post: 18 March 2012, 09:38 PM
  4. Was TAJ MAHAL a temple called TEJO MAHALAYA?
    By brahman in forum Hot Topics
    Replies: 30
    Last Post: 26 March 2011, 09:32 AM
  5. Devi Kanyakumari
    By brahman in forum Temples (Mandir)
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 02 February 2010, 10:53 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •